Antenna Types

Submitted: Thursday, Mar 10, 2005 at 08:57
ThreadID: 21112 Views:1834 Replies:7 FollowUps:3
This Thread has been Archived
I was just interested to read on a UHF suppliers web page that some antennas are only suitable for bull bar mounting on petrols, why not diesels. A salesman asked me a similar question the other day, when I was inqiring about antennas he wanted to know what type of vehicle I drive (Diesel)
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Willem - Thursday, Mar 10, 2005 at 09:06

Thursday, Mar 10, 2005 at 09:06
Probably because Petrol engine vehicles may have more electronic gadjetry which may interfere with UHF signals? Dunno. just a guess in the early morning :o)
AnswerID: 101890

Reply By: Mad Dog (Australia) - Thursday, Mar 10, 2005 at 09:33

Thursday, Mar 10, 2005 at 09:33
That's a good one. I can't think of a reason apart from the diesel vibration shaking it to bits, must be something more obscure than that. Why not email them for the definitive answer.
AnswerID: 101897

Reply By: Shaker - Thursday, Mar 10, 2005 at 09:43

Thursday, Mar 10, 2005 at 09:43
I know that the GME AE609L?, the three piece multi db antenna kit is unsuitable for bullbar mount through experience. Mine kept breaking on corrugated roads, when I returned it they said it shouldn't be on a bullbar, I asked 'why not not state that in your instructions?'
AnswerID: 101898

Follow Up By: will21 - Thursday, Mar 10, 2005 at 10:54

Thursday, Mar 10, 2005 at 10:54
Thats interesting to know about the AE409L, I've just ordered a TX 3200 and AE409L for $330, planning to mount the aerial on one of those brackets that go next to the bonnet as I haven't got a bull bar yet
0
FollowupID: 359750

Follow Up By: Pluto - Thursday, Mar 10, 2005 at 16:52

Thursday, Mar 10, 2005 at 16:52
I anticipated this kind of failure when I installed an AE409L on my bullbar, about five years ago, and sourced a spare base element for my spares box. It's still unused.

Another plus for this antenna is it's interchangability. I have recently purchased one of the Mobile One "Plug and Play" antennas which mounts directly on the 409's base.
0
FollowupID: 359782

Reply By: will21 - Thursday, Mar 10, 2005 at 11:08

Thursday, Mar 10, 2005 at 11:08
Just got a return email from the supplier, it is a vibration issue. what parts vibrate appart? Does the thread come appart? Could this be solved with a drop or two of loc-tite? Or would that affect conductivity?
AnswerID: 101908

Follow Up By: Member - Jeff M (WA) - Thursday, Mar 10, 2005 at 12:09

Thursday, Mar 10, 2005 at 12:09
I imagine if it's a vibration issue most modern deisels wouldn't count as the vibrations are minimal.

Old school diesels may still have an issue though.
0
FollowupID: 359759

Reply By: Savvas - Thursday, Mar 10, 2005 at 12:01

Thursday, Mar 10, 2005 at 12:01
Will,

Which aerial are we talking about here? There might be a member that already has experience with the particular aerial and might be able to give some feedback.
AnswerID: 101917

Reply By: geocacher (djcache) - Thursday, Mar 10, 2005 at 22:08

Thursday, Mar 10, 2005 at 22:08
If it's one of the stainless wire ones with the coil half way up (raw or powdercoated) they tend to snap at the base from metal fatigue after lengthy subjection to vibration.

Doesn't matter the cause of the vibration, rough vehicle or rough road. I know of at least two or three that snapped at the base.

Having said that, I use one. I had a spare element which I had never used and gave it away.

The vibration is probably accentuated by the ground independant bases that are so common on bull bar mounted UHF antennae in the past few years. The mass of the GI base oscillating on the spring base would increase the distance that the base of the element oscillates back and forth - I would have thought.

Anyone remember their HSC physics?

Dave
AnswerID: 102000

Reply By: rolande- Thursday, Mar 10, 2005 at 23:20

Thursday, Mar 10, 2005 at 23:20
CD900 Rugged Elevated Feed 6.5db Antenna
# Ideal for 4WD, heavy transport, mining or industrial uses
# Ultra flexible yet extremely robust 6.5db
# Elevated feed and ground independant.
# Australian Made and the best we have seen..
# The antennas have undergone extensive testing
# We have not been able to break one yet!
# The whip section is wound from stainless steel
# Antenna is injection moulded with polypropylene for rigidity .
# This allows road vibrations to be transferred to the flexible tapered tip
# Eliminating metal fatigue and whip breakages.
# A heavy-duty antenna includes a heavy-duty spring.
# 5m of RG580 cable and connector
# 12 Month Warranty

From presitge communications web site, design negates all breakage reasons above
AnswerID: 102013

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)