Gen--fuel/kms

Submitted: Friday, Oct 11, 2002 at 00:00
ThreadID: 2127 Views:1473 Replies:4 FollowUps:2
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Hello All!

My wife and I will be traveling the outback for about 6-months in December. This will be our first trip. We have a 145 litre tank(Diesel). I suspect that we will be able to travel 1000kms to 1200 kms without re-fueling. Is this enough fuel in between most isolated spots to not have to worry about running out? I know this is a question that in general is conditional upon many variables i.e. how far out one goes out etc. Just trying to get an idea of what to expect.
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Reply By: Gerry - Friday, Oct 11, 2002 at 00:00

Friday, Oct 11, 2002 at 00:00
Hi William. It really is all in the planning. There aren't too many stretches out there with more than 1000 k's or so between fuel stops but with all the info available on sites like this and from motoring organisations, putting together a planned list of fuel stops for remote areas shouldn't be too hard. However, DO NOT expect to get the same economy say crossing the Simpson (1100 sand dunes to climb over) as you get around town, especially if you end up having to use low range for some sections. Further, you'll be carrying extra load and if you're towing, then your economy reduces even more. If the weather turns bad, it's not uncommon to have to make long detours which can add significantly to the distance travelled (probably through mud).

I know it's your first trip and please, don't let the above turn you off or prevent you from being adventurous. Just be well prepared. There's a saying we use in our 4WD Club when it comes to fuel and water... "It's better to be lookin' at it than lookin' for it. Cheers Gerry.
AnswerID: 7323

Follow Up By: Member - William - Friday, Oct 11, 2002 at 00:00

Friday, Oct 11, 2002 at 00:00
Thanks Gerry, I will heed your advice!
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Reply By: Member - Bill - Friday, Oct 11, 2002 at 00:00

Friday, Oct 11, 2002 at 00:00
William, Think twice before heading to the outback for 6 months from December. Remember Burke and Wills? They were ill informed enough to leave Melbourne and head to the outback in August ... and look what happened to them! Seriously, check the average temperatures for thew areas you will be travelling to and through - you will find many areas of the outback are very hot in summer. I suggest you put your trip off for 6 months and leave in June. Good luck.
AnswerID: 7334

Reply By: Peter S - Thursday, Oct 17, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Oct 17, 2002 at 00:00
william,
i would strongly advise against doing an outback trip in december, especially if it is your first trip.it is hot.damn hot. it can kill you. temperatures well over 40 are common. i have lived in alice springs and no one travels in summer if they can avoid it. especially anywhere remote. the wear on vehicles from the heat can be severe. not to mention yourself. i would advise waiting until april. the temperatures then are wonderful. warm days and cool evenings. also the sights are much better, especially if you are thinking of seeing the top end. after the wet season rains have stopped it is a magical place to see. and the fishing is unbelievable.
anyway about your fuel question. if you get around 1000 to 1200 kilometres "in town" i would estimate you would most likely get below that figure out bush. the loads carried for 6 months of touring cuts fuel economy. also the dirt road(especially sandy ones) tend to eat into your fuel range. you need to load up the vehicle before you go see what your fuel range is. dont guess. its too dangerous. once you know then allow about 10% safety margin. that should then tell you how far you can safely get. oh and dont forget to take a jerry can or 2.just in case. a range of about 800 kilometres is plenty to avoid running dry. also when you get to any major towns fill up. the small places are very very expensive and the fuel cost savings can be massive.up to 30 cents per litre.
having just come back from 5 months of adventure i can whole heartedly recommend a trip up north. its sensational. just do it at the right time. oh and as contradictory as this may seem. its not has hard or difficult as many say it is. you just need to be prepared.
AnswerID: 7510

Follow Up By: Member - William - Thursday, Oct 17, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Oct 17, 2002 at 00:00
Peter, Does your reasoning apply to a trip started in Melbourne, then bound for Broome via the nullarbor and west coast hwy? Please send me your E-mail address. I'd like to discuss this topic a bit more. Thanks, William wjf567@bellsouth.net
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Reply By: Member - William - Thursday, Oct 17, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Oct 17, 2002 at 00:00
Peter, Does your reasoning apply to a trip started in Melbourne, then bound for Broome via the nullarbor and west coast hwy? Please send me your E-mail address. I'd like to discuss this topic a bit more.

Thanks,

William
wjf567@bellsouth.net
AnswerID: 7512

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