Towing Constant 4x4

Submitted: Tuesday, Apr 12, 2005 at 19:52
ThreadID: 22009 Views:2042 Replies:4 FollowUps:1
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Hi All
What to do when having to tow a constant 4x4 some considerable distance,does it make any differance whether it is auto or manual,thanks in advance for all replies
Friar
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Reply By: Exploder - Tuesday, Apr 12, 2005 at 20:13

Tuesday, Apr 12, 2005 at 20:13
Hi Friar

If it is a auto anything over 50k’s you have to disconnect the front and rear tail/drive shaft’s. In a manual just put it in neutral and should be fine (not sure about constant 4*4 though). Also if you r talking serious distance then I would use a car trailer as when you get your speed up over 60kp/h it gets a bit dangerous with braking and cornering etc.

Or is it behind a bus on a pole type set up?

AnswerID: 106417

Reply By: Russ - Tuesday, Apr 12, 2005 at 21:46

Tuesday, Apr 12, 2005 at 21:46
Friar,
From memory in my book that comes with the LC100 auto, FULL LIFT, i.e. put it on a trailer.

RB
AnswerID: 106444

Reply By: Swine Hunter - Wednesday, Apr 13, 2005 at 01:55

Wednesday, Apr 13, 2005 at 01:55
Hi there Friar,

As a tow truck operator of 12 years experience, I strongly suggest that if it is an auto, you remove the front & rear driveshafts or select "Neutral" on the transfer case where available if towing more than a couple of km, and that is assuming it has been recently run and the box is warm and wet with trans fluid.
If it has not been run for more than 1 day, or if distance to be towed is more than say 5km I would remove the shafts or select "Neutral" on trans case or have it towed with an all up lift (tilt tray, car trailer etc no wheels on ground). Note that unless you are flat towing it with all 4 wheels on the ground, you MUST remove both front & rear shafts where one axle is lifted off the ground on a cradle type lift and the othe axle remains on the ground. You will not be able to tow it with one axle off thr ground unless both shafts are removed.

Wear on the gearbox clutch packs will result if you don't heed this advice, and a full rebuild will be imminent ie:lots of $$

This does not apply to a manual (except the bit about towing with one axle lifted, you must still remove both F & R shafts in that case), however be aware that if the reason for the tow is gearbox, transfer case, you risk having the wheels lock up while towing if the shaft to any axle that is on the road is not removed. A lock up can also occur if the problem is diff related, and there is nothing you can do about that unless you tow it with an all up lift (again no wheels on the road during towing)

UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES SHOULD YOU DO THE FOLLOWING:
1) Tow it backwards more than a few hundred metres if auto unless you remove both F & R shafts.
2) Attempt to tow it with one axle lifted on a cradle type lift unless both F&R shafts are removed.

Sorry for the long winded explanation, but I have seen many a foolish tow truck drive pay lots of $$ for incorrectly towing autos and constant 4wd's.

Cheers,
Wayne
AnswerID: 106470

Follow Up By: Swine Hunter - Wednesday, Apr 13, 2005 at 02:08

Wednesday, Apr 13, 2005 at 02:08
Sorry in my getting carried away with this post I may have confused you.

Apply the following:

1)If one axle remains on the ground during towing, then the driveshaft to that axle MUST be removed, the driveshaft of the other axle that is lifted off the ground can remain in place, this applies to both auto and manual.

2) If flat towing, with all 4 wheels on the ground, then both driveshafts must be removed if problem is gearbox or transfer related (this is for auto and manual).

3) If not gearbox or transfer problem and it is an auto and the distance to be towed is more than say 5km both shafts must be removed, or "Neutral" selected on trans case where available.

4)If it is manual and problem not gearbox or trans case related then no need to remove anything.
Hope that is a little clearer :)
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FollowupID: 363494

Reply By: Member - JohnR (Vic) - Wednesday, Apr 13, 2005 at 09:31

Wednesday, Apr 13, 2005 at 09:31
friar you could also check post 20153 which discussed the issue in regard to one particular brand. Finding neutral seems to be the best way to go if any regularity is required for the towing.
Cheers,
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AnswerID: 106495

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