tyre pliers

Submitted: Thursday, Apr 21, 2005 at 22:56
ThreadID: 22272 Views:1787 Replies:3 FollowUps:3
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I'm not tight with my $ but I do get enjoyment out of making my own stuff.
I made a set of tyre pliers just by looking at the pictures that we see in mags. However I added a feature. The pivot point has a wing nut so I can separate the two handle thingos and on the ends of the handles I heated up and forged tyre lever ends. But wait there's more. On the rim diameter adjustment leg end I welded a solid piece of round(about 2" long and !.5" fat) as a hammer to assist tyre removal from the rim. I tried all this out on my 15x7's and also and old 13" wheel that the tyre had been on for 20 years. Piece of cake.
I thought I would share this one with you all, Rus
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Reply By: Member - John (Vic) - Thursday, Apr 21, 2005 at 23:00

Thursday, Apr 21, 2005 at 23:00
Thats really great Russel, Well done.
Was Mary pleased with your engineering efforts ?
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Reply By: Russel & Mary - Thursday, Apr 21, 2005 at 23:49

Thursday, Apr 21, 2005 at 23:49
She seems to encourage me just enough at times so that when she has a job to be done I begrudgingly oblige(is that how you spell it).
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Reply By: Member - Jack - Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 06:51

Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 06:51
Try this link. I thought it was a good idea.

Jack
The hurrieder I go, the behinder I get. (Lewis Carroll-Alice In Wonderland)

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Follow Up By: Russel & Mary - Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 09:23

Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 09:23
seems very simple ...BUT... you still need tyre levers,rubber mallet.

Another usefull thing I carry is a 14" bicycle tube to help tubeless tyres re-seat. I place this over the rim edge against the tyre and pump it up a bit.With a little soapy water you can easily seat the bead. Most times out in the bush the compressor can't give enough air at once to seat beads and for $5 or so it doesn't take up much room and saves having to swear and sweat using the "twitch a piece of rope tightly around circumference" method. Rus.
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Follow Up By: Member - Jack - Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 14:19

Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 14:19
I have used a ratchet type tie down strap around the center with good effect (and a bit of soapy water). I rolled a tyre partly off the rim a few years ago at Fraser Island and had to do that to get the tyre back on. Worked fine. ARB compressor pumped it up.

Cheers
Jack
The hurrieder I go, the behinder I get. (Lewis Carroll-Alice In Wonderland)

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Follow Up By: Wizard1 - Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 15:46

Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 15:46
I used a very simple bush method of breaking the bead when replacing truck and light truck tyres when I had no bead breaker.

1. Place tyre on ground in front of front wheel, preferably the off side (driver's side) so you can see what you are doing while hanging out the door.

2. Slowly move forward onto the tyre rubber. Don't go too fast or you could catch the edge of the rim.

3. The weight of the vehicle is usually enough the break the bead.

I lost count how many tyres I replaced using this method and never had a problem, both split and normal rims.

Not saying its the best way, but it works when in a pinch.

Wizard
Prado TD
Gold Coast

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