travelling with firearms

Submitted: Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 19:01
ThreadID: 22296 Views:17725 Replies:15 FollowUps:16
This Thread has been Archived
Hi can anyone tell me if there is any problems carring a firearm from queensland (licenced) around australia. Planning on some wild pig shooting on some properties.

Regards
Cameron
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: MAVERICK(WA) - Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 19:07

Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 19:07
is this a friday funny or are you serious? yes there problems - i suggest to write to each state police service and each state national parks people and see what they say. rgds
Slow down and relax......

Member
My Profile  Send Message

AnswerID: 107867

Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 19:57

Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 19:57
As you seem quite sure there are issues with taking firearms from one state to another why don't you tell us what they are? Or are you just another irrational anti firearms individual?

Mike Harding
0
FollowupID: 364739

Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (WA) - Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 20:54

Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 20:54
as a pistol shooter and a rapid pro gun nut i will tell you the same unfortunately I am not up on current regs but there is problems - the hardest being getting correct answers from coppers. dont waste time with local coppers or firearms officers they have a bad tendancy of not knowing or making up their own rules go straight to the top of the states firearms branch alternately orgs such as ssaa should be helpfull
0
FollowupID: 364751

Follow Up By: Eric from Cape York Connections - Saturday, Apr 23, 2005 at 06:39

Saturday, Apr 23, 2005 at 06:39
I my opinion if you are a resonsible gun owner you should know the law.

All the best
Eric
0
FollowupID: 364767

Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Saturday, Apr 23, 2005 at 06:57

Saturday, Apr 23, 2005 at 06:57
So, Eric, as a reasonable four wheel drive owner we can assume you are quite conversant with the law regarding motor vehicles in all the states can we?

Mike Harding
0
FollowupID: 364769

Follow Up By: Eric from Cape York Connections - Saturday, Apr 23, 2005 at 07:01

Saturday, Apr 23, 2005 at 07:01
Sorry mike I read the question wrong.
I thought he ment the state he was in.

All the best
Eric
0
FollowupID: 364771

Reply By: Lone Wolf - Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 19:12

Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 19:12
I think perhaps try asking the Sporting Shooters Association.

It has been many years since I have been involved with the firearm fraternity, and even back then, the laws between states were not all the same.

I am sure that there are provisions, because say, a Roo shooter in Broken Hill, may travel to Adelaide each fortnight, and the list goes on.....

Again, I would seek association help on this matter, and get the goods straight from those that really know.

Wolfie
AnswerID: 107870

Reply By: Member - Jack - Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 19:46

Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 19:46
I think the State shooters idea is the best way to go. I did it once - a rifle between Qld/NSW/Vic, and I checked into the first Police Station I came across at each border. I never carried it in, but went in and told them I had a licensed weapon. They took details and let me go on my way. NSW came out to check it (I think to make sure the weapon was in one place and the block/firing pin) was in another.

It was a hassle, and now I don't travel with one as my hunting days are over.

Jack
The hurrieder I go, the behinder I get. (Lewis Carroll-Alice In Wonderland)

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 107877

Follow Up By: Exploder - Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 20:02

Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 20:02
Hi Herdsman

As long as it is licensed and you have your paper and photo ID and it is out of sight it shouldn’t be a problem. If you want to do it fully by the book then id let the cop’s in each state know beforehand. To the best of my knowledge WA is the strictest with firearms. Funny that how it’s got the most land.

I assume you have arranged this with the farm’s/stations you will be going too

If you can’t get a good answer I will ask my mate he went dear shooting in Tasmania from WA and had no problems.
0
FollowupID: 364742

Reply By: herdsman - Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 19:47

Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 19:47
Yeh i'm serious,we dont have to many dramas in Qld, but then we are ahead of the times!!!
AnswerID: 107878

Follow Up By: Steve - Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 21:20

Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 21:20
Ahead of the times ? How is Joh..
0
FollowupID: 364753

Follow Up By: Rosco - Bris. - Saturday, Apr 23, 2005 at 14:51

Saturday, Apr 23, 2005 at 14:51
Ah Steve

"Just don't you worry about that now"
0
FollowupID: 364795

Reply By: Crackles - Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 19:50

Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 19:50
Different states have different laws but I know WA treat you almost like a criminal just for carrying one. We declared ours at the fruit fly stop when they asked and were told to head directly to the police station. 2 hours later after a fair bit of negotiating we were given a transit permit allowing us to carry it but not fire it anywhere in the state. They wanted us to hand it in & pick it up on the way out. Check with each state 1st.
Cheers Craig............
AnswerID: 107880

Reply By: herdsman - Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 19:52

Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 19:52
Thanks guys, its soundin g like more of a drama. Might leave the interstate pigs alone buy the sound of things

Regards
Cameron
AnswerID: 107881

Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 20:06

Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 20:06
The vast majority of police officers have _no idea_ about firearms legislation - neither do the vast majority of lawyers. I'll look into it for you as much as I am able over the next few days. Contact the Sporting Shooters Association of Australia
http://www.ssaa.org.au/
for your best chance of correct info.

Given the fuss made regarding "uniform gun laws" back in 1996 (including seizure of lawfully owned property) one would have expected it not to be an issue - and I don't think it is - but I'm not certain, so I'll check.

Just keep in mind people on this forum - bad people who own guns don't post and ask if it's OK to take them across a state line... do they?

Mike Harding
0
FollowupID: 364744

Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Saturday, Apr 23, 2005 at 08:44

Saturday, Apr 23, 2005 at 08:44
It sounds as if there are no real problems with visiting Victoria with firearms and I think NSW is similar - despite what another poster has said there does not appear to be any special storage requirements when transporting cat. A or B firearms in NSW, see the letter from John Tingle at the link below. Here are two links to the SSAA website which may help:

http://www.ssaavic.com.au/legislation.htm
http://www.ssaavic.com.au/licensing.htm

Mike Harding
0
FollowupID: 364779

Follow Up By: Nudenut - Sunday, Apr 24, 2005 at 16:13

Sunday, Apr 24, 2005 at 16:13
herdsman..it aint too hard...
ask SSAA or at least the local coppers...they should be up with it a lot more than I am.

Most firearms ACT's and regulations should be on the internet...i know SA firearms Act is and The regulations also.

so must the others but ringing the firearms branch in each state couldnt be easier and quicker
0
FollowupID: 364848

Reply By: D-Jack - Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 20:20

Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 20:20
Planning on doing any touristy things? Then consider national parks, conservation parks, aboriginal lands etc. most or all of which will not let you take firearms. A bit like liquor in some aboriginal lands. Would be very careful.

I like to slay a goat, pig or bunny every now and then for a bit of tucker, but if I was you I would leave the shooter at home. Borrow one from the farmer who's property you are shooting on.

D-Jack
AnswerID: 107883

Reply By: peterK - Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 22:46

Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 22:46
Cameron
I think this site may be useful

Attorney_Generals: Firearms Regulations in Australia
AnswerID: 107900

Reply By: Member - Blue (VIC) - Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 23:14

Friday, Apr 22, 2005 at 23:14
Cameron,
did my firearms safety course last night here in Vic. One of the things they really stressed was that it is now a legal requirement in NSW to have the gun in a locked container which is bolted to the interior of the vehicle. Apparently it must be the equivelent of a gun safe for the car.

As coppers often get it wrong, I'd follow up with some of the other suggestions, just though I'd pass on what was taught to me.
Blue
AnswerID: 107903

Follow Up By: Swine Hunter - Sunday, Apr 24, 2005 at 12:13

Sunday, Apr 24, 2005 at 12:13
Hi Blue,
I would go back to the lecturer and tell him or her to go and learn the relevant act before preaching to people sitting courses.
I am a licensed firearms dealer (NSW) pistol shooter, long arms shooter, shotgun shooter and I operate a pistol club of 313 members.
There is no such requirement!!

Cheers,
Wayne
0
FollowupID: 364835

Follow Up By: Member - Blue (VIC) - Monday, Apr 25, 2005 at 12:12

Monday, Apr 25, 2005 at 12:12
Hi Wayne,
your credentials speak loudly to me... I've already ordered a trigger lock and have used a Tamper Proof bolt to locate a bolt cutter resistant cable in the vehicle. I thought it was all wasted effort if I was going to require a lockable box... I don't think I'll bother with the lecturer, preaching above the requirements has to be less harmful than the reverse.

Blue
0
FollowupID: 364903

Reply By: Chaz - Saturday, Apr 23, 2005 at 00:45

Saturday, Apr 23, 2005 at 00:45
herdsman,

I am a member of SSAA and regularly travel from SA into NSW to hunt pigs & goats, and I can tell you that these two states do recognise each others regulations. However it is imperative that the firearm is out of sight and is made inoperable eg. bolt and magazine removed. All ammo must be locked in a seperate container and also out of site. The firearms don't need to be locked in a box, but do need to be mechanicaly fixed to the vehicle. I use a plastic coated 6mm wire rope that I feed through the trigger guard and padlock to the rear seat mounts. I have travelled all over Aus and always take a firearm, but it's carried this way and never comes out. I only had to use it once when I hit a roo in WA and had to put it down. In SA we do a lot of culling in National parks and so far I havent found a ranger that was unreasonable so provided that you don't intend to use it and it is inoperable and out of site, you shouldn't have a problem.

Chaz
AnswerID: 107913

Reply By: V8Diesel - Saturday, Apr 23, 2005 at 10:35

Saturday, Apr 23, 2005 at 10:35
I have a small, household style, storage regulations compliant handgun safe 'blind bolted' into the back of my rig. This is on file with the police firearms branch as well. It is a brilliant thing to have for many reasons when travelling. Depending on where I'm going, I keep my valuables (camera etc) and other 'goodies' in that.

If the whole item won't fit in, keep your bolt, lever or shotgun's fore-end in the safe and you can 'demonstrate responsible transport' in my understanding. A strong, boltcutter resistant, plastic coated wire cable passed through the action and mag-well, padlocked to a secure non-removable part of the bodywork just adds security as well.

Have fun!
AnswerID: 107932

Reply By: Member Eric - Sunday, Apr 24, 2005 at 09:48

Sunday, Apr 24, 2005 at 09:48
As long as it's bolt is removed and amo is locked away. Out of sight and you have made a effort to lock it in the car , as in a simple lock to the cargo barrier , you can even go into national parks
AnswerID: 107989

Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Sunday, Apr 24, 2005 at 12:31

Sunday, Apr 24, 2005 at 12:31
I don't believe the above is correct. National Parks and firearms is a bit of a grey area, in some NPs hunting is permitted and therefore it's permissible to carry firearms into that park and if the only way to access the hunting area is through a non-hunting area of an NP then it's OK to carry firearms through that area too. But, in general, _possession_ of a firearm in an NP is an offence. The following is a (not very good) link - search the page for "firearms":
http://www.edo.org.au/edonsw/site/factsh/fs05_2.asp

The fact that the firearm may have the bolt removed and be locked to the vehicle does not relieve the holder of the key/bolt of "possession" of the firearm - after all he can make that firearm active in a few moments.

Some naughty people have been known to cover their firearms with a blanket or similar whilst in National Parks but, of course, I could not suggest such a course of action.

Mike Harding

mike_harding@fastmail.fm
0
FollowupID: 364836

Reply By: Swine Hunter - Sunday, Apr 24, 2005 at 12:21

Sunday, Apr 24, 2005 at 12:21
All,
As a licensed firearms dealer NSW in all categories a-h and classes 1-18 I will tell you that providing the following are met, there will be no problem in travelling with the firearms throughout the country"
1. Person in posession must be licensed for the categories in posession
2. All firearms must be registered
3. Firearms and ammo stored seperatley (containers do NOT need to be locked however category H (handguns) must be locked ie: container or trigger lock fitted

There are mutual recognition laws in place throughout Australia, and there may be certain time constraints where your posession in some states may be limited, usually 30 days + in that state for any continuous period.
As stated earlier in this thread, National parks, indigenous communities, and the like may not permit posession of firearms or transit through those areas.
If you have any other questions on this or would like further advice, email me itsales@bigpond.net.au
Don't listen to Police, they make up the law as they go, one will tell you something different to another 10 mins apart.

Cheers,
Wayne
AnswerID: 107994

Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Sunday, Apr 24, 2005 at 12:42

Sunday, Apr 24, 2005 at 12:42
Thanks for that Wayne - excellent info.

>Don't listen to Police, they make up the law as they go, one will
>tell you something different to another 10 mins apart.

A few years ago a senior police officer with special responsibility for areas connected with firearms and the enforcement of firearms laws gave me, quite specific, but totally incorrect advice which for a few days left me in a situation where, had I come to the attention of police, I would have been charged with a number of firearms offences and may well have been imprisoned - all because, in good faith, I took advice from a police officer on his area of specialisation. When I discovered my position, thanks to a helpful firearms dealer, I was able to quietly correct matters - cost me about $250 to make that correction.

Mike Harding
0
FollowupID: 364837

Reply By: johnsy1 - Sunday, Apr 24, 2005 at 15:46

Sunday, Apr 24, 2005 at 15:46
This is a n excellant example of why if we could rid ourselves of states and just have a county and federal system of govment with the feds making all the laws.
AnswerID: 108007

Follow Up By: Nudenut - Sunday, Apr 24, 2005 at 16:27

Sunday, Apr 24, 2005 at 16:27
lets get rid of that little johnny blackmailer...he made the states follow & abide his demands, following port arthur and that stupid person who went crazy with the hand gun, by witholding grants etc etc etc.....

a common dictator or blackmailer?
all he has done is remove legal registered firearms ...those that police knew where they were...
oh dont forget those illegal ones (unregistered) that the crims handed in too hahahaha

cost us tax payers millions of dollars......

I got more than three times the value for one firearm and then went out and got two more and pocketed the rest...it, the gun buybacks, really made to sense to me!
0
FollowupID: 364849

Reply By: Member - Troy - Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 11:48

Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 11:48
Can't speak for the other states but in WA you will need a permit to travel with your firearm as we don't recognise other state licences. You can get one from the local station and last time I did one it was about $15 ... saves the hassle of getting stopped and charged ... fines are quite decent for firearm offences over here.

Good Luck

Troy
AnswerID: 108224

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)