what size inverter will run a electrolux 240/gas fridge?

Submitted: Saturday, Apr 30, 2005 at 19:58
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Hi again! We have an old jayco swan with an electrolux 240/ gas fridge. What size inverter would we need ( to convert to 12 volt) and are they any good?
Thank Lenni
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Reply By: Member - Raymond - Saturday, Apr 30, 2005 at 20:05

Saturday, Apr 30, 2005 at 20:05
Hi Lenni
Are you sure that there is not 12volts already to the fridge, we used to own a Jayco Swann back in 1982 and it had a three way fridge in it. Take the vent of the back of the fridge lower one and check that there is not 12 volts fitted already. You should be able to see the red and black wire running to the smaller heating element.
Ray
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Follow Up By: lenni - Saturday, Apr 30, 2005 at 20:11

Saturday, Apr 30, 2005 at 20:11
Thanks Raymond. That could be very helpful as Im sure it is the original fridge.It is in good condition I will check this out.Ours is also a 1982 model.
Thanks again
Lenni
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Follow Up By: lenni - Sunday, May 01, 2005 at 20:12

Sunday, May 01, 2005 at 20:12
Hi Raymond.
I checked the fridge and you are correct it does have 12 volt ! I found the wires as you said except they were both black. I hooked them up and yes it works!!! Thankyou very much for the great information. I dont need an inverter now do I!
Thanks again regards Lenni
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Reply By: Member - Davoe (WA) - Saturday, Apr 30, 2005 at 20:25

Saturday, Apr 30, 2005 at 20:25
you are going about things the wrong way it should run off of 12v 240v and gas 240v and gas are the best way to run them it should run for about 7-10 days on a 4kg bottle with 12 volt power an option when driving but it is extremely inneficient and will drain your battery if not driving. They can be pretty marginal especially when hot but if you cqan remove it easily do so and clean the burner at the back and remove all dust. While at it turn it upside down and give it a good shake up. I have had a couple of units and I reckon Engals are a better bet but they are dead reliable and if serviced like described above will give service forever
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Follow Up By: lenni - Saturday, Apr 30, 2005 at 21:52

Saturday, Apr 30, 2005 at 21:52
Thanks for the feedback. Regards lenni
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Reply By: AndrewX - Saturday, Apr 30, 2005 at 21:06

Saturday, Apr 30, 2005 at 21:06
You would need an inverter that produced in the order of 1500 watts or a current of at least 6 amps. at 240 volts. This would draw 120 amps from your battery - the equivalent of about a dozen driving lights ... inverters are suitable for charging camera and torch batteries only. Use the formula ampsXvolts = watts.
AnswerID: 108995

Follow Up By: lenni - Saturday, Apr 30, 2005 at 21:54

Saturday, Apr 30, 2005 at 21:54
Thanks for the info. Didnt realize that inverters were so hungry!
regards lenni
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Follow Up By: hl - Saturday, Apr 30, 2005 at 23:32

Saturday, Apr 30, 2005 at 23:32
That is incorrect!
It would draw around 60-90 watts only!
Still a lot to have running from the battery all the time though, but nothing like 120 amps! More like 6-8 amps at 12V through on the inverter.

Cheers

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Reply By: Keith_A (Qld) - Saturday, Apr 30, 2005 at 21:19

Saturday, Apr 30, 2005 at 21:19
Hi Lenni - have used Electrolux 3 way in last 2 campers over 15 years.
Our first was a 1976 model - with 3 way (240V; 12V and Gas) electrolux.
To improve efficency several hundred percent - add a 12v computer fan on the heater fins on the outside, plus a 12v computer fan inside the fridge onto the inside cooling fins. Connect the wires from both fans together. Use a $5 thermostat from Jaycar electronics (or similar) attached to fridge exhaust chimney, as the switch.
(camper does need a battery - but a small one for motorbike etc would do).
We run ours on 240V to chill down at home - the night before. Takes only 3 hrs to get ice on iceblocks in freezer. For trip, we have always used them on gas. Some would argue against running on gas as a high risk (esp while travelling). Others have a different view. Research the subject and decide for yourself...
The fans can turn a marginal unit into a brilliant fridge.
Regards..........Keith.
AnswerID: 108998

Follow Up By: lenni - Saturday, Apr 30, 2005 at 21:51

Saturday, Apr 30, 2005 at 21:51
Thanks for this great information. We appreciate it
regards lenni
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Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (WA) - Saturday, Apr 30, 2005 at 22:15

Saturday, Apr 30, 2005 at 22:15
yep same keith, I cant really coment on 12 v power as I used it once to make sure it worked(it did) then never again just used gas all the time even when refuelling (petrol) and I am still here (wheather that is good or not is for others to decide)
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Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Sunday, May 01, 2005 at 08:37

Sunday, May 01, 2005 at 08:37
>For trip, we have always used them on gas. Some would
>argue against running on gas as a high risk (esp while
>travelling). Others have a different view.

Let us all hope and trust that all those others bother or remember to stop and extinguish the flame at the fridge well before they pull into service stations to refuel!?

_ANY_ kind of naked flame near to a petrol pump is total stupidity.

Mike Harding
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Follow Up By: Keith_A (Qld) - Sunday, May 01, 2005 at 09:21

Sunday, May 01, 2005 at 09:21
Mike - thanks for your input. I have spent a deal of time researching this very subject/debate. My career was is insurance/risk management so I understand the risk side. To assist with my data, where could I get a list of actual petrol station fires in Australia, where the investigation recorded the probable cause as Camper/RV/fridge related? Please understand this is in no way a disagreement (or an agreement). I analyse facts and decide from those. As an aside, I underwrote the light aviation industry in Aust - and will NEVER fly in a light plane - based on statistics. I have friends who are ardent aviators (even fly ultra-lights....argggggg) who consider me foolish.
Given the Australian love affair with caravans and camping, there must have been some servo fires - but I need to know the actual numbers.
Thanks......Keith
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Follow Up By: Member - Raymond - Sunday, May 01, 2005 at 09:38

Sunday, May 01, 2005 at 09:38
Hi Keith
As a retired MFB fireman, can you please put a note on your van that you are running you fridge on gas in a service station. This will allow us not to be too close. I agree that the chances of explosion are low, but naked flames plus petrol vapours are not a good mix. I have attended house fires were gas leak had reached the pilot light of a heater and the damage was massive.
I think for safety I would prefer not to have the fridge on gas will filling up.
Ray
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Follow Up By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Sunday, May 01, 2005 at 09:41

Sunday, May 01, 2005 at 09:41
Gas fridges run a bi-metallic safety valve. If the flame goes out, the valve cools and seals, hence no gas leak, no danger. Travelling with them running on gas, the only risk you tun is that the fridge will turn off and your beer will go warm.

The only way I can see that a fridge running on gas at a servo could be a danger, is if somehow fuel got poured in through fridge vents and onto the flame. Sure, it's a possibility, but a very remote one.

Cheers,

Jim.
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Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Sunday, May 01, 2005 at 09:56

Sunday, May 01, 2005 at 09:56
>I have spent a deal of time researching this very
>subject/debate. My career was is insurance/risk
>management so I understand the risk side.

Excellent, so you'll be in a position to post a convincing thesis of why a naked flame on a petrol station forecourt is _not_ a significant risk - I await it with interest.

>To assist with my data, where could I get a list of actual
>petrol station fires in Australia, where the investigation
>recorded the probable cause as Camper/RV/fridge related?

No idea. Perhaps there haven't been any? What would that prove? Some people have been lucky? Most people have more sense than to want to be by a petrol pump with a flame so most don't do it therefore the statistical overall risk is very low? That's just playing with maths. I'll wager no one has ever been killed driving a 1934 Rolls Royce Silver Shadow over a cliff in an easterly direction. Does that mean it's safe to do so?

>I analyse facts and decide from those.

In that case I am astonished that you would think doing this is anything but very dangerous!?

Be well Keith - I think you may need all the luck you can get.

Mike Harding
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Follow Up By: hedevil - Sunday, May 01, 2005 at 10:29

Sunday, May 01, 2005 at 10:29
Hi what I would like to know is how you can keep the fridge operating, on gas while travelling , while at low speeds around town yes sure pilot light will more than likely stay on but once on the hwy goes out.....
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Follow Up By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Sunday, May 01, 2005 at 10:34

Sunday, May 01, 2005 at 10:34
hedevil,

It is most likely being blown out. The faster you go the more breeze. You'll need to restrict the airflow to it, but you still need some ventilation for cooling. A bit of a balancing act.

Cheers,

Jim.
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Follow Up By: Keith_A (Qld) - Sunday, May 01, 2005 at 11:28

Sunday, May 01, 2005 at 11:28
For the record - Almost every petroleum company/institute/forum in the world begin their safety guidelines with text such as :
"Turn off your vehicle engine while refueling. Put your vehicle in park and/or set the emergency brake. Disable or turn off any auxiliary sources of ignition such as a camper or trailer heater, cooking units, or pilot lights."
Minimising dangerous risks is the responsibility of every-one.
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Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (WA) - Sunday, May 01, 2005 at 11:39

Sunday, May 01, 2005 at 11:39
wooa looks like I started something - no doubt flame and fuel vapors dont mix I would put the chances of it starting a boom as low but certainly above mobile phone use. I didnt actually think of it until I was getting fuel at Sheringa and I said stop I havnt put the fridge out. The reply was dont worry about it no one else does. refuelling aside the fridge should run happily on gas while travelling might presnt a safety hazard in a crash dunno but just dont crash
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Follow Up By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Sunday, May 01, 2005 at 11:57

Sunday, May 01, 2005 at 11:57
I can't ever remember any news reports of a Petrol Station fire being caused by a fridge. I'm not saying it can't happen, I just don't recall it ever happening.

Would seem to be an extremely small risk.

Cheers,

Jim.
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FollowupID: 365767

Follow Up By: AdrianLR - Sunday, May 01, 2005 at 21:48

Sunday, May 01, 2005 at 21:48
The Parting Pic of the March 2005 4X4 Australia is fairly illustrative - extracts for those who don't have it: "While outboard fuel was being siphoned from a drum on the tray of my mates HJ75....into the boats fuel tanks....a gust blew the fumes to where the fridges were.....all the gear was lost and we were lucky to save the other vehicle....

In the US some states have a law that bans fridges running on gas from being in vehicles driven through tunnels.

Adrian
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