tubless tyre repair

Submitted: Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 16:48
ThreadID: 22656 Views:1915 Replies:7 FollowUps:4
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Hi all,

I staked my first tubless tyre the other day (always had tubes before current car) and am wondering what people out there do to repair?

I got hold of a repair kit (nameless chinesse thing) for about $15 from a store, and plugged the hole. The store reckon that the repair is fine and that lots of people just leave the tyre with the plug in it indefinitely. However, its not a mushroom type repair, but rather just a string of stuff that you push in from the outside.

In term of future stakes, what is the cheapest solution? Not real keen to fork out big bucks for kits from 4WD suppliers (they are usually very overpriced)

thanks

Andrew
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Reply By: Footloose - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 17:20

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 17:20
Andrew, IMHO any tyre repair should be inspected at the first tyre shop you come to.
Those big buck kits are usually very good. At least the ones that come with Tyre Pliars are.
AnswerID: 109647

Reply By: locallaw - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 17:20

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 17:20
Gidday,The type of repair you carried out is only for an emergency repair to get you to where you can get it repaired properly.The correct way is for the tyre to be removed and a plug being inserted from the inside after preperation of the hole IE mushroom plug!!!!!!!.
Seeya Locallaw
AnswerID: 109648

Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 19:15

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 19:15
I just leave them in ,,, lets do a poll and find out how many 'fell' out!!!
They wont.. michael
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Follow Up By: Member - Mungo Explorer (NSW) - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 23:44

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 23:44
I don't like to chance plugged tyres in ordinary high speed driving, so I keep plugged ones as spares, either as the fifth tyre on the back or for an axtra spare on remote trips, on the roofrack. Should be okay for getting me back to civilisation where I can make sure that there's four sound rubbers on the wheels.
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Reply By: Member - Davoe (WA) - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 17:59

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 17:59
some of the politically incorrect mob if you get them aside will admit to not having a problem leaving those temp repairs in for 000s of ks and still going. For 20 bucks prop best value to do your temp repair then take it to yourtyre repair mob. Those expensive tyre removal kits have their place in remote travel for tyre replacement or temp emergency repairs on badly holed tyres or for those that would not like to part with 20 bucks at beurepairs
AnswerID: 109657

Follow Up By: Exploder - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 19:02

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 19:02
Gday all

Couldn’t agree more the plug’s u buy from the shop r good for 1000’s of k’s.

I think you will find that depending on the size of the hole that most tyre shop’s will put the same plug in as we do The plug’s that u put in r just fine, if unsure just get it checked out when you get back.

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FollowupID: 366258

Reply By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 19:12

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 19:12
I have a system in a red box,, safety seal i think its called,,,, only 100 bucks.. ive fixed a few of my own ,also two punchures for my sister,(she brings them to me now because its free), its already paid for itself.. Good quality, professional system.. Someone mentioned a few months ago that they bought a chinese system, probably like you and when inserting the sealing wad, the tool broke and he cut his hand badly... not the sort of thing you want when you are out enjoying yourself and or doing some serious 4wheeling. I think you would be cursing the bloody thing for the rest of the trip... Michael
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AnswerID: 109675

Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 19:57

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 19:57
We plug them while still on the vehicle. When you stop, just hook up the pump to get some air back in and identify the puncture, then most kits need glue before the plug. Other kits are glueless and have a white tub of lube to aid insertion. Often need 2 or 3 plugs in the one hole.

As for permanent repair? The theory is that you can't be sure about how much damage may have been caused internally - so the recommendation is to have the tyre removed, inspected from the inside and if suitable, mushroom patched or whatever. What everyone does is up to them, but I personally wouldn't get this done until I was back in town.

Cheers
Phil
AnswerID: 109684

Reply By: locallaw - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 19:59

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 19:59
Gidday All,What a lot of people are forgetting is that it is illegal to leave them in and if it is proven that an accident is caused by the tyre plug repair carried out you will be up for a lot of money to pay for all damages and you could loose all insurance.
Just my bit Locallaw
AnswerID: 109685

Follow Up By: D-Jack - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 20:17

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 20:17
Thats an affirmative locallaw

The max diameter hole that can legally be replaced is 6mm (In SA - don't know about other states but one would presume would be an Australian standard. Any bigger than that and the tyre shop should not repair.

The other problem is that when we get a puncture, there is not necessarly just rubber damage - there is also the possibility and probablilty of steel strand damage. By doing a roadside repair you may make the tyre keep air in it (or restrict it to a very slow leak), but it will not necessarily keep water from getting inside the wound, where the steel can rust and weaken the entire section of tread, and blow at just the wrong time (usually at high speed when heavily laden)

Locallaw makes a good point in relation to insurance. We all know what they can be like.

Maybe if your tyre only has a few thousand ks left in it it may be worth the risk, but if not my personal opinion is it should be repaired professionally.

Having said that there are lots of things I should do but don't! like:

Wash my car regularly to prevent industrial fall out building up
Eat healthy and exercise
Check the oil during long trips
Buy the bride flowers occasionally
Read a book (the last one I read was in high school and I am now 32)
Scan my computer for viruses more often
Drink less

D-Jack
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FollowupID: 366278

Reply By: Member - Tim - Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 14:37

Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 14:37
Does anybody consider that driving on a tyre that "might" blow out at high speed could be a problem?

Wether the insurance will pay out is secondary to my and my families safety as far as I am concerned. Tyres are one of the most important things you can have to ensure your safety so why not get the job done properly?

Trolute, if you are looking solely for the cheapest solution rather than the right solution then please don't drive on the same roads as I am as I don't want to be involved in your accident. Sometimes we can be lucky enough that the right solution is also cheap but not often.

Tim.
AnswerID: 109836

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