bead breaking

Submitted: Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 17:35
ThreadID: 22658 Views:3544 Replies:4 FollowUps:17
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While I'm here and in the typing mood,

Is it possible to use the weight of the fourby and a Hi lift jack to break the bead on a tyre?

Seems simple enough :)
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Reply By: Footloose - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 18:12

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 18:12
Sure is. In fact I used this method several times when in the doo doo. It does however have several drawbacks. Firstly the hilift can be dangerous at any speed. If you have special mounts for it then it's a little less so. And secondly, you still need to break the bead in several spots, on both sides. That can be a fair bit of hard yakka.
I've found that tyrepliars are much less work.
AnswerID: 109661

Follow Up By: conman - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 18:18

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 18:18
thanks Footloose,

I've never had to braek a bead ( or even seen it done) but thought that you could use the tongue of the towbar and the foot of the jack on the tyre.

Then it might be a matter of just turning the tyre.
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FollowupID: 366247

Follow Up By: Footloose - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 18:24

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 18:24
Yep, you can do it that way quite successfully. Personally I prefer to shift positions rather than the tyre :)) It's worthwhile practising on your spare if you feel that you may to do it one day. Easier to drag out a coldie at home than on a 45degree slope of sand in 44 C .
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FollowupID: 366248

Follow Up By: conman - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 18:36

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 18:36
yeah, actually I never thought of being on uneven ground, might make things a bit more interesting.
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Reply By: Member - Ray - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 18:50

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 18:50
Save your back and your sanity and fork out for a R&R Beadbreaker. Comes with full instructions(even a video) and so simple even I managed to get it right first time, stuffed back and all.
AnswerID: 109666

Follow Up By: Richard & Leonie - Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 20:41

Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 20:41
I have an R and R and thought before I went away I would practice with it. I took the 15" spare from my trailer and had a go. The tyre was almost welded to the rim by the rust but after a while I broke the bead all around. Big mistake though trying it on a 15" wheel. Very hard to get off and back on again because it does not have the spare circumference of a 16" or better still of a 17" to stretch the tyre over the rim. I have not found where I can play the video on the car yet!
Richard
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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 19:50

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 19:50
I use hilift or vehicle jack for bead breaking demos for club training. They work fine, and are my preferred options for mags, as you're less likely to scratch them.

Have a look at this car jack beadbreaker

Also, tubeless rims only need to be done once each side; split rims can be a pain - if they're been on a while, often have to work your way around the tyre.

Cheers
Phil
AnswerID: 109681

Follow Up By: Footloose - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 20:13

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 20:13
That's interesting, I've never done a tubeless repair. No wonder the beadbreaker tools are so much easier to use. Temp repairs sound easier also. But I won't be changing from 235XR16 LT's on splits.
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 22:47

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 22:47
The beadbreaker tools can take practice. I watch plenty of people struggle with tyre pliers. The R&R is a nicer tool, but I think it costs twice more.

In my experience, the average tubeless tyre is easier to take off a rim than the average split rim. The average split rim will have had the tyre on for a while, and they get rusty, the rubber band sticks to the rim, and the tubes sticks to the inside of the tyre. To break the bead on a split rim you usually have to go all the way round. Then it can be an effort to lever off the split. Reassembly of course is a piece of cake.

The average tubeless tyre doesn't have the rust issue, the bead breaks once and your boots push the rest of it off. Levering the tyre off is what people struggle with and is greatly aided by lubricating the tyre and rim edge with detergent before levering off, and making sure the opposite side of the tyre is well inside the wheel well.

But with tubeless, you can pretty much get by with plugs and leave the hard work to the next repair place you come to.

Cheers
Phil
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Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (WA) - Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 01:35

Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 01:35
phil after doing over 30 splitties last year it would seem obvios you havnt done many most changes dont need anything more than 2 levers and no breaker and is actually easier than a bike tyre
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FollowupID: 366319

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 16:32

Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 16:32
Hi Davoe,

I reckon if I had to fix 30 splitties in a year, they wouldn't have time to collect rust or sieze up. I'm not surprised that yours come off easily, but I don't think most people have that many punctures. Notice that I used the word "average" a lot.

Cheers
Phil
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FollowupID: 366419

Reply By: Truckster (Vic) - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 23:14

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 23:14
You can also drive over the tire right next to the rim, it will pop off...
AnswerID: 109724

Follow Up By: Toy_Hilux - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 23:29

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 23:29
Too right!!! All we ever did in the mustering camps over the past 20 odd years. The only thing that you have to be wary of is that the tyre that you are attemping to change doesn't pop out from under the car and hit someone. Also used a lump of timber on the tyre right near the rim set up like a ramp. Just drive up it, same rules.
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Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic) - Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 08:17

Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 08:17
Good to see that mentioned guys. Have a lever in a shed here that has done many too, including the very difficult quad or trike bike tyres. Mate was buying special gear to do that and I was popping them easily already. Just my weight as the power, multiplied of course.
Cheers,
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Follow Up By: MrBitchi - Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 08:46

Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 08:46
Correct me if I'm wrong (I often am...) but if you drive over the tyre, won't you bend the tread in half radially? It's not designed to bend like that and you could end up with damaged steel belts, leading to premature tyre failure.
This method of tyre removal was a big no-no when I was in the forces.

Cheers, John.
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Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic) - Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 09:03

Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 09:03
MrBitchi you are probably right, but in circumstances where you have not been able to change the tyre because you didn't have the right tools, a bit of ingenuity may have got you to safety. A bit like the folks that have died because they didn't know to let the tyres down a bit to drive out of a sand bog.
Cheers,
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John

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Follow Up By: MrBitchi - Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 10:08

Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 10:08
JohnR, I prefer the Car Bead Breaker (see Phil G above) but also carry tyre pliers. I guess if I became desperate I'd use your method but only as a last resort.

Cheers, John.
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FollowupID: 366344

Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic) - Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 10:45

Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 10:45
I think I said that above John, I would prefer to do it with some sort of bead breaker too. Would signal more danger with wire bands under the tread. High tensile does take a lot to break it though. I agree with the last resort but others have practiced it regularly I see.

The bead breaker I have in the shed is a lever and a curved piece to fit down and under the rim with a lot of purchase from my bodyweight and the other end of the lever pinned to the upright of the shed.
Cheers,
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John

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Follow Up By: Toy_Hilux - Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 11:05

Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 11:05
Never had a tyre damaged this way yet. But saying that, most of the tyres used are rag tyres of the work utes(dont have the luxury of being able to carry everything, just the essentials to live by). Have done it on a few occassions on our own vehicles with radials but also must admit on using the sliding bead breaker(which is a bar that is curved on the end to fit under the rim and then the other end is in another pipe with a solid end at the other end. Lift up and then let it slide back down so that it acts like a slide hammer. Works like a dream. Maybe heavier to carry than tyre-pliers etc, but less time to set up and only a fraction of the price(or they were).
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Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 22:47

Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 22:47
I prefer the Car Bead Breaker (see Phil G above) but also carry tyre pliers

... we all would if they werent so typically 4wd accessory priced.
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FollowupID: 366509

Follow Up By: MrBitchi - Friday, May 06, 2005 at 07:54

Friday, May 06, 2005 at 07:54
True, they are expensive but I got them a few years ago at the 4WD show for 60% of normal retail. Bargains can be had occaisionally :-)
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