Hi lift jack v exhaust jack

Submitted: Saturday, May 07, 2005 at 20:06
ThreadID: 22758 Views:4043 Replies:14 FollowUps:12
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Is it down to personal preference or is it more sensible to take the good old trusted hi lift jack instead of the easier lazier option of exhaust jack???

Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Sasha and Roy
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Reply By: Bob of KAOS - Saturday, May 07, 2005 at 20:28

Saturday, May 07, 2005 at 20:28
Mrs Holmeboy
I have both and they are both a waste of space. A good hydraulic jack is a better option.
AnswerID: 110217

Reply By: Mrs Holmeboy - Saturday, May 07, 2005 at 20:36

Saturday, May 07, 2005 at 20:36
Thanks Bob for the reply. We can't decide which one would be better for our situation as we'll be towing a Bushtracker and dirving a F250 as a tow vehicle so they both are quite heavy pieces of kit and we will need something that is robust enough in case we ever need it.

Sasha
AnswerID: 110220

Reply By: Zapper - Saturday, May 07, 2005 at 21:00

Saturday, May 07, 2005 at 21:00
Not sure about Bobs reply, hydraulic jacks are good for changing on the hard going, think maybe that what he meant. I carry a roo jack all time on my spray rig, through the winter I would use it probably once a fortnight getting bogged in muddy stuff always by yourself and no one to tow, they are great, quick to lift each wheel plus you can drive off them if in a big hole, mine is rated to 3850kg I think, its a "black rat" cant fault it. I never go in the paddock without it. Cant imagine crawling under a vehicle in the mud to try and jack a vehicle with hydraulic, roo jack lifts about 4 feet hydraulic about 8 inches...waste of time. Have not used a exhaust jack, they look good for sand, but if you were bogged in the wet you would still have to crawl round in the mud to get it under the vehicle.
AnswerID: 110225

Follow Up By: Mrs Holmeboy - Saturday, May 07, 2005 at 22:09

Saturday, May 07, 2005 at 22:09
Thanks for the reply Zapper can I ask though what is a roo jack? May be something very straight forward but to us girlies it means nothing! Good point about sand and mud senarios gives us more to think about.

Sasha
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FollowupID: 366778

Reply By: Peter 2 - Saturday, May 07, 2005 at 21:35

Saturday, May 07, 2005 at 21:35
As has been said, an exhaust jack you will have to get it between the vehicle and the ground, could be nigh on impossible in some situtions.
A highlift can also be useless in some situations, biggest problem is points to lift modern vehicles, nothing solid at the extremeties to lift off.
A lot of TJM bullbars have lift points for a highlift incorporated in them.
I've got a friend with an F250 and he has aTJM bar with highlift points but lifting at the rear can only be done in the towbar, nothing else will take the weight. Be a precarious lift too.
Highlifts can be very dangerous and should be used with extreme care.
Peter
1996 Oka Motorhome

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AnswerID: 110231

Follow Up By: Mrs Holmeboy - Saturday, May 07, 2005 at 22:12

Saturday, May 07, 2005 at 22:12
Thanks Peter

Good point about the safety aspect although we haven't got a TJM bull bar fitted so this wouldn't be an issue for us.

Is it now a case that it is better to take both to cover all aspects?????

Sasha
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FollowupID: 366780

Reply By: eerfree - Saturday, May 07, 2005 at 22:18

Saturday, May 07, 2005 at 22:18
Mrs Holmeboy
Please do not take this as gospel but I think that I looked at an advertisment for exhaust jacks that said they were not suitable for F250s,it did not explain why!
eerfree
AnswerID: 110239

Follow Up By: Mrs Holmeboy - Saturday, May 07, 2005 at 22:31

Saturday, May 07, 2005 at 22:31
Thanks for that I think it looks like more researching is required on this one ;o)

Sasha
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FollowupID: 366784

Follow Up By: Crackles - Sunday, May 08, 2005 at 17:49

Sunday, May 08, 2005 at 17:49
I wouldn't be surprised if it was not suitable because the exhaust pipe on a current F250 was too big for the funnel on the end of the hose. Looks like it's nearly 4".
Craig......
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FollowupID: 366854

Reply By: Member - Duncs - Saturday, May 07, 2005 at 22:25

Saturday, May 07, 2005 at 22:25
The highlift can also be used to pull if you have got the right gear to attach to it, couple of chains and shackles (all suitably rated)

I recently used my highlift to get the trailer square behind the car again after jacknifeing in a tricky bit. I simply lifted the trailer and then pushed it sideways off the jack I got about 1 or 2 feet each time.

I am not sure that an exhaust jack will do more than a straight lift. I know people who swear by the exhaust jack, I have never used one but have rarely been bogged where a straight lift would get me out of trouble.

But as has already been said, if you have no suitable points on which to jack maybe the exhaust jack would be a better option for you.

Duncs
AnswerID: 110240

Follow Up By: Mrs Holmeboy - Saturday, May 07, 2005 at 22:33

Saturday, May 07, 2005 at 22:33
Thanks Duncs another fine point, much appreciated. Judging from yours and everyone else's replies I think I'll go in search of a few F250 owners and see what they use in similar situations.

Sasha
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FollowupID: 366785

Follow Up By: Shaker - Sunday, May 08, 2005 at 09:45

Sunday, May 08, 2005 at 09:45
Lift points are not problem now, ARB have imported the 'Lift Mate' which attaches to the wheel rims!
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FollowupID: 366810

Follow Up By: Utemad - Sunday, May 08, 2005 at 10:48

Sunday, May 08, 2005 at 10:48
How does the 'Lift mate' attach to the wheel rim?

Our F250s have the factory alloy wheels. Would think that any method of attaching to them would be asking for damage.

To use a highlift jack on the front I think it would be possible to have something made to attach to the towing eyes. Like the bumper attachment you can buy.

The rear you could use the towbar but that is a helluva lot of weight to be lifting especially if you are loaded and trying to lift the entire rear of the vehicle up from the centre towbar point.
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FollowupID: 366813

Reply By: Crackles - Saturday, May 07, 2005 at 22:34

Saturday, May 07, 2005 at 22:34
Sasha & Roy. They are 2 toatally different tools & 1 really shouldn't be seen as an alternative to the other.
IMHO the high lift is more suited to high country driving. Great for lifting the car out of ruts then pushing accross to firm ground. Doubles as a short term winch, bead breaker, clamp or stump puller. There are several brackets available to attach to bullbars or wheel hubs allowing use on a modern type of 4by.
I see the exhaust jack as more suitable in central Oz particually in sand, being light & easy to pack when space is often at a premium.
For an F250 I doubt there would be an exhaust jack suitabley strong enough to safely lift it but may be wrong.
For your truck I'd suggest a good quality multi stage hydraulic jack & pack a base plate for soft ground if your BBQ hot plate isn't up to the job already.
I've had both & sold the exhaust jack because the situation never arose where I needed it. The Hilift lives on the back of the Cruiser but hasn't been used in 3 years despite many tough trips. Won't bother putting on the next car but will be handy around the house.
Cheers Craig..........
AnswerID: 110246

Reply By: Member - Jiarna (SA) - Sunday, May 08, 2005 at 01:45

Sunday, May 08, 2005 at 01:45
I agree with Craig. Both the high lift and the exhaust jack are dangerous pieces of equipment. But then again anything that elevates 3 tonnes of 4by is going to be risky. Having used various types of lifting devices, I'd go with a good quality hydraulic jack (not a $20 cheapie) and a nice big jacking plate to use in the soft stuff. If you really want one of the others, go for the high lift, but make sure there's somewhere on your vehicle to jack from with it. And get some training so you don't have to learn the hard (and maybe fatal) way how to use it properly.

Just my opinion FWIW

Cheers
John
Those who say something cannot be done should not interrupt the person doing it.

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AnswerID: 110254

Reply By: muzzgit (WA) - Sunday, May 08, 2005 at 02:39

Sunday, May 08, 2005 at 02:39
Exhaust jack can crush bits under the vehicle, like your exhaust system.
Because it can flex, and wraps around the chassis as it lifts, anything vulnerable under the vehicle will simply bend or break.
AnswerID: 110256

Reply By: Mrs Holmeboy - Sunday, May 08, 2005 at 05:13

Sunday, May 08, 2005 at 05:13
Thanks for your comments we will certainly look into the hydraulic jack.

sasha
AnswerID: 110259

Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (WA) - Sunday, May 08, 2005 at 14:55

Sunday, May 08, 2005 at 14:55
F25o should com with a good quility hydrolic jack with the rest of the tyre changing gear under the bonnet
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FollowupID: 366825

Reply By: Rosco - Bris. - Sunday, May 08, 2005 at 15:14

Sunday, May 08, 2005 at 15:14
Re-read Zapper's response. A hydraulic jack is as much use as an ashtray on a motor bike if you're sitting on your belly in mud or sand.

Cheers
AnswerID: 110295

Reply By: Wayne (NSW) - Sunday, May 08, 2005 at 15:41

Sunday, May 08, 2005 at 15:41
Sasha & Roy,

I have a high lift jack and it stays at home all the time. It is great if I have to do some tree stump removal at home but that is about all I use it for.

When we do our 4WD training course all we show is how to use a exhaust jack. If used the right way it will lift a wheel off the ground enough to fill the rut in with some rock or dirt, no need to get both back wheels off the ground and try and push a vehicle.

The other problem with a high lift jack where are you going to carry it? Inside the vehicle because of it's size and weight it would end up on the bottom of all the gear. It is not a good idea to carry it on the outside of the vehicle. On the front it is a potental weapon and would be illeagle to be carried there in most if not all states now. The other problem when carried on the outside is that the workings, mainly the springs, get full of dust and water and will not always work.

As for using them as a winch, forget it, a good hand winch will beat it all the time.

Wayne
AnswerID: 110304

Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Sunday, May 08, 2005 at 17:12

Sunday, May 08, 2005 at 17:12
>When we do our 4WD training course all we show is how to use
>a exhaust jack. If used the right way it will lift a wheel off the
>ground enough to fill the rut in with some rock or dirt, no need
>to get both back wheels off the ground and try and push a vehicle.

Interesting.

I have an exhaust jack but have never used it (I go to a _lot_ of trouble not to get bogged :). How do you get it properly under the vehicle if it's well sunk in (say) mud? And how do you make it lift just one wheel without the bag ballooning out from under the vehicle?

Mike Harding
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FollowupID: 366847

Follow Up By: Wayne (NSW) - Sunday, May 08, 2005 at 17:38

Sunday, May 08, 2005 at 17:38
Mike,

They can be a bit of a bugger to get right the first time, but they will lift just one wheel if the bag is placed in the right position.The bag does not have to be fully inflated to lift the vehicle.

You should give it a go at home just to see how easy it is to use, but don't forget to chock the wheels that are still on the ground. We also use carpet squares to help protect the bag from any sharpe bits or bolts that are under the vehicle where the bag is going the rest. A cross member on the chassis rail is a good place or even the bottom of the fuel tank will take the weight and help lift the vehicle.

Yes we also go to a lot of trouble teaching the correct line but sometimes it all goes pear shape and you are bogged, or there is always someone else whose luck has run out.

Stuck in mud is always a tricky recovery. I would try and recover the vehicle out the way it went in. If it had to be lifted the bag can be flatten down very small and with it's large surface area the chance of sinking in the mud is a lot less than using any form of mechanical jack. Even a base plate unless it was the same size as the bottom of the exhaust jack would tend to sink.

Wayne
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FollowupID: 366849

Reply By: johnsy1 - Sunday, May 08, 2005 at 19:13

Sunday, May 08, 2005 at 19:13
It sounds to me that your all using the exhaust jack under the body of the car ,if you use on its side under the diff of the car its far easier too use.As for mud and sand a long handle shovel is really what you need to make a narrow trench into and under the diff then lift with the airbag so you lift the whole vehicle on its suspension and pack your way out of trouble. Hi lift jacks wallaby jacks what ever you wish to call them need a bit of hit and miss to get right in balance and position.
AnswerID: 110332

Reply By: Truckster (Vic) - Sunday, May 08, 2005 at 19:26

Sunday, May 08, 2005 at 19:26
You sound like you want it to change tires with.. High lifts are not for changing tires.

What do you want it for?
AnswerID: 110337

Follow Up By: johnsy1 - Monday, May 09, 2005 at 09:27

Monday, May 09, 2005 at 09:27
Truckster it just sounds to me a lot of people are jacking the body of the vehicle and in doing so have to jack way too high to take up the suspension travel when packing under the wheels is enough and the airbag is great for that. The only time I've used a hi lift jack in anger and nothing else would do was to break the suction of quick sand in the Finke River and we snatched my f100 off 2 jacks.
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FollowupID: 366923

Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (WA) - Monday, May 09, 2005 at 13:09

Monday, May 09, 2005 at 13:09
Used a high lift 4 times but every time was when doing extreme crosscountry bushbashing and got hung up on logs covered by dense regrowth. The only way to go with the highlift is to use hublifter. After using hublifters i cant understand why people get jacking points added as without lifting the wheel directly i wouldnt have got the hight to be able to unhang the ute. (also you can get the instability required to move a vehicle jacked up by only lifting one wheel)
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FollowupID: 366946

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