Training in servicing and basic repair of 4WD

Submitted: Thursday, May 12, 2005 at 15:29
ThreadID: 22928 Views:2082 Replies:8 FollowUps:8
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Back when I owned a '56 VW Beetle, then a HR Holden, I used to do my own servicing and lots of repairs and maintenance. Haven't done any for many years and don't have a clue about modern vehicles. It goes or it's broken!! Current 4WD is the first diesel I've owned.

Wife and I are about to embark on some serious trips, starting with Cape York in Aug/Sept this year and figure I need to be able to basic repairs to get out of trouble. I plan to carry some basic spares on this sort of trip (hoses, belts, fuses and filters , possibly spare springs for trailer, etc). But not much point if I don't know how to fit them. Yeh OK, I can at least change a fuse and and air filter. But a fuel filter or air conditioner belt? Not sure; guess I'd work it out eventually. Haven't even used a set of tyre pliers!

I'll get the Gregory's workshop manual eventually, but it is not available for my vehicle yet.

So, where can I get this sort of knowledge? I'm pretty handy and practical. Have built 2 houses as owner builder for example, but not much experience with vehicles. I'm on the Gold Coast. I note that Duncan's run a one day 4WD maintenance course in Brisbane. If I can't find anything else I guess I can start with that.

Any suggestions?
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Reply By: flappa - Thursday, May 12, 2005 at 15:57

Thursday, May 12, 2005 at 15:57
You can do a basic short mechanics course at a lot of TAFE's.

Will give you a fair idea of what you are up against , but , it tends to be car specific , which in your case , is probably almost useless , being a diesel.

Duncans sounds like a really good option.
AnswerID: 111015

Follow Up By: Member - Norm C (QLD) - Thursday, May 12, 2005 at 16:08

Thursday, May 12, 2005 at 16:08
Thanks flappa. Looked at local TAFE course listing. Don't seem to have anything mechanical at the moment in short courses.
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Reply By: Member - Beatit (QLD) - Thursday, May 12, 2005 at 15:57

Thursday, May 12, 2005 at 15:57
G'day Norm,

Maybe do a few services on the diesel (had one myself once and did a 6 week TAFE course, it was a good course and showed how simple basic diesels are). Change and/or check the belts, oil change, oil level checks diffs etc, that way you'll get to do it in the comfort of your own garage, find out which tools you need and get help if you have any problems.

Best to work it out this way, while your getting ready for the trip. I'm sure that if you have done the basic stuff before you'd have no problems once you get started again.

Kind regards
AnswerID: 111016

Follow Up By: Member - Norm C (QLD) - Thursday, May 12, 2005 at 16:14

Thursday, May 12, 2005 at 16:14
That's the basic plan Beatit. It is a new vehicle. Vehicle manuals say service every 10,000. For the moment I plan on getting the 10,000 services done by a mechanic. I'll do a filter and oil change myself in between so these are done every 5,000. Will probably do a bit more myself in time.

Concern is whether I'll pick up enough knowledge in the next couple of months to be comfortable heading off on the big trip.
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Follow Up By: flappa - Thursday, May 12, 2005 at 16:22

Thursday, May 12, 2005 at 16:22
IMO though , as long as you at least HAVE the parts with you , you are half way there. Either to fit yourself , or , seeing how the Cape is a long way from being isolated (as far as the number of travellers) , the chances of someone coming along to offer help , that DOES know what they are doing , is pretty strong.
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Reply By: Footloose - Thursday, May 12, 2005 at 16:14

Thursday, May 12, 2005 at 16:14
Local 4wd club ? The members are usually all too willing to help a newbie.
AnswerID: 111021

Follow Up By: Member - Norm C (QLD) - Thursday, May 12, 2005 at 16:27

Thursday, May 12, 2005 at 16:27
Good point Footloose. I joined the local club a couple of months ago. Didn't want to impose too much, but no harm in asking around.
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Reply By: Member - Andrew L (VIC) - Thursday, May 12, 2005 at 17:30

Thursday, May 12, 2005 at 17:30
Hi Norm, I knew nothing about servicing and bought a Haynes manual. Found it very helpful. Now I can do lots of basic servicing.
Hope this helps.
AnswerID: 111028

Follow Up By: Member - Andrew L (VIC) - Thursday, May 12, 2005 at 17:33

Thursday, May 12, 2005 at 17:33
Here's their link haynes
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Reply By: Member - iMusty (VIC) - Thursday, May 12, 2005 at 17:38

Thursday, May 12, 2005 at 17:38
Maybe hit a local mechanic.

One that actually works on Deisels.

Do a few free days for him or Sat mornings.

I know it's the sort of thing a young bloke would do But, who knows, It might be a great way to learn.

You'll cop some ribbing like I will for posting the idea, but you might have some fun and learn too.
AnswerID: 111029

Reply By: Member - Norm C (QLD) - Thursday, May 12, 2005 at 18:16

Thursday, May 12, 2005 at 18:16
Thanks guys. I've sent an e-mail to Haynes to see when the manual for the new Hilux will be available. Didn't know until I looked at their website the Haynes produces the Gregory's manuals as well. So they are the only company I know of that produces these after market manuals. Are there any others?

I suspect that once I have a manual, I am smart enough to work out the level of info I need.

iMusty, your idea isn't as silly as you suggest. If I can find a small local workshop that does a fair bit of deisel work, I might give it a go. Nothing to lose and the best way to learn. Don't know of one off hand.
AnswerID: 111033

Reply By: 80scruiser - Thursday, May 12, 2005 at 22:06

Thursday, May 12, 2005 at 22:06
My father used to teach a handy mans course in motor mechanics at a local community college in Syd until he retired. It used to be every tuesday night for 10 weeks about 2 hours a night.
Check your local area to see if they have a community college.
AnswerID: 111101

Reply By: old-plodder - Friday, May 13, 2005 at 08:31

Friday, May 13, 2005 at 08:31
I had the same situation about 20 years ago when I bought my first 4wd. Had done a bit of work on various cars over the years.

Before our first trip, I decided I need to know how, so put on new radiator hoses, belt, filters etc over about 6 months. The originals were reasonably good, but decided to do it anyway for the experience. Took the old belts and hoses as spares. Also gave me the chance to see which tools I really needed! And I put the clamps etc on so I could access them easily from particular angles.
Alot easier to do it at home than out in the middle of no where, and it didn't matter if you had to stop to read the manual for an hour, or break for a handy cold drink.

There is a funny side to this. First time I did the fuel filter on the diesel, it took me all weekend. Couldn't get the pump to prime properly first up and get the air out of the system :-) Now I can do it in 15 minutes.
AnswerID: 111140

Follow Up By: Member - Norm C (QLD) - Friday, May 13, 2005 at 09:08

Friday, May 13, 2005 at 09:08
Sounds like me OP. Often takes me 2 hours to get something to work the first time, then 2 minutes after that. It would probably help if I read the directions first, but what is the fun in that.
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Reply By: Member - Norm C (QLD) - Friday, May 13, 2005 at 12:11

Friday, May 13, 2005 at 12:11
Well, my problem won't be solved by buying a workshop manual. This is the response I got from Haynes to my query on when a manual would be available.

'Thank you for your recent inquiry regarding the Toyota Hi Lux 1KD – FTV Diesel

Unfortunately we do not have any information in either the Haynes or the Gregory's brand that will help you, and there is nothing on our editorial notes that indicated that a manual or an update will be written for the above vehicle in the next 6-12 months.

I am sorry we could not help you with your inquiry in this instance, but if you need any further assistance in the future, please do not hesitate in contacting us again'

Regards,

Rita Simmons,

Haynes Manuals Inc.

Australia.

If you have an 05 Hilux, don't expect a manual any time soon. At least I got a response.

AnswerID: 111167

Follow Up By: Member - Glenn D (NSW) - Sunday, May 15, 2005 at 20:21

Sunday, May 15, 2005 at 20:21
Hows it going Norm,

Couldn't you buy a factory workshop manual from Toyota?

I think the reason most people go for the Gregory's one is the factory one costs an arm and a leg.

Hope this helps
Glenn
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Follow Up By: Member - Norm C (QLD) - Sunday, May 15, 2005 at 21:01

Sunday, May 15, 2005 at 21:01
Thanks Glenn. I've e-mailed Toyota Australia. See what sort of response I get.
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FollowupID: 367718

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