Jerry cans

Submitted: Monday, May 30, 2005 at 22:06
ThreadID: 23436 Views:2010 Replies:10 FollowUps:4
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Hi, just another question in regard to our Cameron Corner/Birdsville trip in July, this has probably been debated before but I couldnt find the answer in the archives.
Metal or plastic jerry cans ( for diesel).
Thanks,
Will
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Reply By: Glenno - Monday, May 30, 2005 at 22:16

Monday, May 30, 2005 at 22:16
As long as they pass the relevant Australian Standard they both will be OK.

Ihave metal because my old man went around Oz in a series land drover donkeys years ago and i still use the jerry cans for mower fuel. They are stamped 1965 the year they were made. From memory they were ex army at auction.
For me metal is good as i can easily see any paint being worn off so i can look for damage etc. Maybe a bit harder with plastic.

People will have good stories about plastic as well.

Cheers,

Glenno.
AnswerID: 113651

Reply By: Member - Geoff M (Newcastle) - Monday, May 30, 2005 at 22:24

Monday, May 30, 2005 at 22:24
Hello Will,
They both have advantages,
The plastic is cheaper than metal. But the metal is more abrasion resistant.
The metal is more robust, plastic is lighter.
Both are required to meet Australian Standard and should be marked accordingly.

Do you already own the containers? Or are you buying them special for this trip? If a special purchase, will you use them again?

If your buying them as a one off special for this trip only, go for the plastic. Lighter, cheaper, if you hole one throw it away when you get home, no great loss. If you expect to use them for many trips over many years, one answer, steel.

I've got about 8 steelies I inherited from my grand father from his early Land Rover days. Ex army with date stamps ranging from about 1950 to 1953 and still going strong.

Geoff.
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AnswerID: 113653

Reply By: Member - Davoe (Widgiemooltha) - Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 00:24

Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 00:24
I had 2 jerries 1 metal one that rode at the back of my camper and 1 plastic that I had inside. After selling my camper I bought another plastic one (havnt used it yet) for inside my 80. Neither leaked and neither sprung a leak - probably answers your question
AnswerID: 113659

Reply By: Member - Banjo (SA) - Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 08:41

Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 08:41
Yep - the black plastic jerries with the yellow fittings (commonly available here and there) are very robust. Had mine for years using diesel and nairy a problem - about to buy another one for extra capacity on the trailer.
AnswerID: 113679

Reply By: hoyks - Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 08:49

Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 08:49
I go for plastic these days. I did a trip up Cape York with tha Army years ago and we had several jerries split aling the seams. None of the water jerries leaked. Also my cousin had a metal one split from being heated/cooled in the shed for a few years. The expanding and contracting put a pinhole crack in the side of the can.

No problems with rusting on the inside either.

I have had my Rheem plastic one swell up to resemble a beach ball (not reccomended) and it is still OK.
AnswerID: 113683

Reply By: Willb - Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 10:48

Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 10:48
Thank you everyone for your informed opinions.
This is what makes this forum so good. Information backed with first hand experience.
Because I am unfortunately only able to take these trips irregulary I think I will go for the plastic ones for the above mentioned reasons.
Thanks,
Will
PS should I cover them in rubber to act as a buffer against rubbing.
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AnswerID: 113695

Follow Up By: Member - Banjo (SA) - Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 16:03

Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 16:03
I used to insulate mine from rubbing with scraps of thin carpet (in the previous camper) - not stuck on - just slotted in to the holders with the jerry.... should they get filthy with mud etc, I'd just put new bits of scrap carpet in.... the new camper has 'tight' jerry holders - might wait and see re rubbing.
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FollowupID: 369819

Reply By: Trevor - Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 13:45

Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 13:45
Will, if space isn't an issue perhaps you may want to consider a 60lt drum. I've used them before with no dramas and find they take up a whole lot less space than 3 jerries.
You can try your local panel beater for an empty thinners drum or a drum recyclers.
You can syphon from the drum straight into the tank or decant into a jerry, depending on how much fuel you need to carry.
T
AnswerID: 113722

Follow Up By: Moggs - Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 14:08

Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 14:08
Seems like a good suggestion re: space, but.....

......if they are not approved for carrying fuel in the vehicle you may have some issues with insurance / police etc if something goes wrong.

Just a thought....I personally would stick with a quality steel or plastic jerry that is designed for the purpose it is being used for.
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FollowupID: 369792

Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (Widgiemooltha) - Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 22:40

Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 22:40
some servos polocies is that 20l max containers can be filled (doubtfull if the pimplefaced consul operator would stop you though)
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FollowupID: 369897

Reply By: Member - Kim T (VIC) - Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 14:20

Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 14:20
I crossed the Simpson with both a plastic and a metal jerry filled with diesel. No problems with either, except that the metal, with its cam lock, seals better. This I found out from a prior trip into the centre. Also, the pouring spout for the plastic is inside the jerry, so when you pull it out, the ribs drop diesel everywhere. My answer in the end was to carry both the plastic and metal jerry in a large plastic bin in the rear - and use the metal one first.
AnswerID: 113733

Reply By: Member - Scrubba (NSW) - Wednesday, Jun 01, 2005 at 14:06

Wednesday, Jun 01, 2005 at 14:06
Hi Will,
I had a plastic one (yellow Willow brand) fall off a trailer on the Gibb River Road north of Drysdale Station. The jerry can contained 20ltrs of diesel. A panel to which the jerry can was attached broke loose as a result of prolonged travel on corrugated roads (and poor design) while traveling at about 80k/h. As luck would have it (depending on how you look at it) I saw the jerry can and the panel hit the dirt. On contact with the ground, the metal panel and the jerry can separated. The jerry can rolled and tumbled along the dirt for about 40-50Mtrs. The panel has lots of damage (twists, dents and fractures) while the jerry can remained in tact and sealed - apart from a few scratches... maybe a gouge or two as well.
I think that a metal one would have ended up more like the panel that fell off.

During the trip I has occasion to carry the jerry cans on the trailer, on the roof rack and, for a short distance, one in the car. Being plastic, they are not noisy and cause little or no damage if they come in contact with other objects, accessories and/or bodywork.
This mishap demonstrates that the Willow brand plastic ones are sturdy as well.

I should mention is that the screw-on flexible spouts that come with them can split if you bend them too far. Also, I use these spouts to support the top of the jerry can at the car's filler neck so I can maneuver the bottom of them while refueling.

Scrubba
AnswerID: 113902

Follow Up By: Member - Scrubba (NSW) - Wednesday, Jun 01, 2005 at 14:14

Wednesday, Jun 01, 2005 at 14:14
didn't finish...

"...Also, I use these spouts to support the top of the jerry can at the car's filler neck so I can maneuver the bottom of them while refueling..."
This practice caused a small split it the spout(s) as well. While they're not designed for this, I can't see how else I can get the fuel into the car. Needless to say I carry a few spouts with me.
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FollowupID: 369953

Reply By: Dan 1 - Wednesday, Jun 01, 2005 at 23:36

Wednesday, Jun 01, 2005 at 23:36
Hi wilb,

A number of people have shown that there is no real great difference other than personal preference. That said, both are durable unless abused. Plastic is obviously lighter when empty, but metal have the three piece handle which allows you to easily pass a metal jerry to someone else or to carry two emptys together at the same time... Plastics require double handling only having one handle..
metals can eventually leak at the lid if the rubber seal gets cracked by age.
But plastics can get a crossed thread. Metals have a built in breather pipe whereas plastics require a small cap to be taken off to allow a constant flow of fuel.

at the end of the day its your own preference
AnswerID: 114014

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