100 Series conversion

Submitted: Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 10:01
ThreadID: 23444 Views:3316 Replies:5 FollowUps:7
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I have a RV 100 Series L/C live front axle with constant 4WD.
I previously had a 80 Series standard with part time 4WD, and preferred this set up and would like to convert my 100 Series to part time 4WD. I am aware of a conversion kit comeing out of Victoria, which converts constant 4WD to part time 4WD. I beleive the viscous coupling is replaced with some type of spool and obviously free wheeling hubs are added.
Does anyone have any information or feedback on this type of confersion.
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Reply By: Kiwi Ray - Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 11:51

Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 11:51
Hi tg
Why would you want to do away with the constant 4x4 you have better car control on wet roads and far better braking
AnswerID: 113708

Follow Up By: tg - Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 13:47

Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 13:47
Hi Kiwi Ray
The down side is front tyre ware, extra load and ware on front diff and also reduced fuel economy.
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Follow Up By: Longreach - Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 14:37

Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 14:37
Not trying to talk you out of it but is the front tyre wear really an issue ? My Coopers have done over 80,000 so far. I wonder how much you might gain doing the conversion.
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Follow Up By: Member - T-Bone (ACT) - Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 14:51

Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 14:51
Um, pardon my ignorance on the subject, but isn't the Toyota "constant" four wheel drive really only one wheel drive until the centre diff is locked? I thought the 100 series is designed so that it has an open centre differential, and combined with open front & rear diffs this means you could conceivably have drive going to only one wheel until the centre diff is locked. If so, I don't think there'd be much change in economy, wear rates, etc.

T-Bone.

P.S. A thousand apologies to all those Toyota people out there if I'm spewing out a bunch of rubbish.
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Follow Up By: Nudenut - Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 15:51

Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 15:51
Tyre wear is neglible...if geometry is right

As kiwi says..better handling if left in 4wd all the time....especially if you accidently run left hand rubber off shoulder of bitumen...its a lot easier to get back on and far far safer
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Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (Widgiemooltha) - Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 20:50

Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 20:50
I think I would prefer the old school manual locking hubs but for around $1500 (I think) I could easily live with the full time 4wd and spend the cash on Extracors and 3 inch system or a fridge with bag and slide, or a hf radio (2nd hand) or roller draw for the rear or............................
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FollowupID: 369878

Follow Up By: ynotb - Wednesday, Jun 01, 2005 at 03:04

Wednesday, Jun 01, 2005 at 03:04
Howdy Tbone, I would say that on a good traction surface drive would be transmitted to all 4 wheels evenly until one or more wheels lost grip.
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FollowupID: 369911

Reply By: black bull - Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 20:36

Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 20:36
hi tg,
if you were to call active 4x4 at beresfield nsw he can help you as i have spoken to him about this conversion and he had just taken delivery of his new 100 series and that was the thing he was going to do it don't have a name or number sorry
bb
AnswerID: 113795

Follow Up By: gqpat - Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 20:50

Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 20:50
Try 4wd systems they usally advertise in 4wd monthly they have a kit available...
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Reply By: nick riviera - Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 21:19

Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 21:19
you would have to do a lot of km's to break even on the money you spent on a conversion. I have a HZJ105 RV and tyre wear and fuel consumption have never been an issue.

Just how much fuel do you think you will save? The standard 100's I've driven have only been marginaly better by 1-2 L per 100km on a good day.
AnswerID: 113803

Reply By: Kiwi Ray - Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 21:37

Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 21:37
Hi every one
I run 4 80# all constant 4x4, 4.2 turbo, 2 manual, 2 auto ( i has the hydraulic box the other has the electronic unit)
One truck is my winch clhallenge truck 2 for work and one good one. they all average 11.5 -13 litres / 100 ks I have not noticed any great difference between the auto and the manuals. One work truck gets approx 75.000 for a set of tyres my good truck has just clocked 78.000 on a set of tyres this both city and country driving.
The turbo Lc has a viscous unit in the centre diff and the rear diff is limited slip unless it has diff locks
On the seal you would have all four wheels driving This also helps on componant wear as the load is being shared.
As yet I have not seen any adverse effect from the constant drive, some of my work trucks have been over 400,000 when sold and I have had no transmission or drive line problems.
Ray
AnswerID: 113813

Reply By: tg - Wednesday, Jun 01, 2005 at 07:57

Wednesday, Jun 01, 2005 at 07:57
Hi guys,
Thanks to everyone for the advice. It appears that I may be wasting my time with the conversion.

However, if anyone is interested I did find a conversion kit available from Mark's Four Wheel Drive Adaptors in Vic. Kit price is $899.00.

thanks again,
TG
AnswerID: 113853

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