adding acetone to diesel

Submitted: Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 14:19
ThreadID: 23661 Views:9595 Replies:13 FollowUps:15
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Researched a range of info on this and found that everyone who has actually tried acetone in diesel has had a positive experience with it. The only negative comments were based on perception rather than actual experience. Have given it a go myself for last month on 200tdi Disco - 100ml acetone in 80l of diesel. Has reduced smoke (even on start-up) and engine runs better. Mates Disco with 400K k on the clock has stopped spewing out excessive smoke - yes, I realise he probably should have replaced the injectors, and acetone is probably just covering up other sins but... There is some logical science to this and diesohol (addition of ethanol) is already well-recognised, but many think acetone is better and it's certainly cost-effective given the small amounts required...
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Reply By: flappa - Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 14:37

Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 14:37
I'm trying that in my Petrol 4wd.

No actual measured gains yet , but seat of the pants tells me , I dont use quite as much fuel given the price of the acetone
AnswerID: 114753

Reply By: Redback - Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 15:24

Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 15:24
I have been researching this myself and have one question your Disco is a series I i'm assuming, so i have a Disco II TD5 and it has the high density polyethelene fuel tank, has the Disco I a steel, alloy or Polyethelene fuel tank like the TD5.

I can't find info on whether acetone has any adverse effects on polyethelene.

Baz.
AnswerID: 114762

Follow Up By: pathfinder - Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 15:30

Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 15:30
earlier Discos have steel tank, but I mix acetone with some diesel in a 5l steel contained first, then pour in and fill up with diesel. The extremely low concentration of acetone in the final mix is highly unlikely to affect anything. A number of people have been doing this for years in the same car without adverse result...
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Follow Up By: flappa - Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 15:36

Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 15:36
I might also work as a water repellant Baz ;)
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Follow Up By: Redback - Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 15:36

Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 15:36
I have read that some vehicles with plastic tanks have had problems hence my querey, if you know people with DIIs that are adding acetone with no bad effects i might give it a go.

Baz.
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Follow Up By: Redback - Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 15:38

Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 15:38
I will never live that down will i Graeme, lol !!

Baz
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Follow Up By: flappa - Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 15:47

Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 15:47
Nope , never ever Baz ;)

There was a thread on Overlander about using acetone in Diesel . I'll have another look at the links to see if there is any info there.
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Follow Up By: Redback - Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 15:54

Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 15:54
Thanks mate don't want to stuff the injectors, at $1100ea not a cheap test.
I'll go into Overlander as well when i get home.

Baz.
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Follow Up By: flappa - Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 16:27

Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 16:27
Not sure which links you have looked at Baz.

here's a few

http://staging.forums.overlander.com.au/viewtopic.php?t=25353&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=0

http://www.naxja.org/forum/showthread.php?t=51453&page=7&pp=15

http://pesn.com/2005/03/17/6900069_Acetone/

The info I can get from these links , and a couple of others , in the amounts being talked about , shouldn't be an issue to plastic tanks.

Plenty of guys running it in Boats and Race cars , and most run plastic tanks.

Your vehicle though , your choice.
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Follow Up By: Member - Blue (VIC) - Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 21:45

Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 21:45
HDPE will tolerate Acetone quite nicely, especially in small amounts
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Wednesday, Jun 08, 2005 at 18:22

Wednesday, Jun 08, 2005 at 18:22
Acetone is sold in plastic bottles!
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Reply By: garrycol - Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 16:38

Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 16:38
I have a Disco series 1 and it has plastic fuel tank.

Gazz
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Reply By: GUPatrol - Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 17:28

Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 17:28
Guys,
I would not try acetone in a modern diesel such as the LR TD5, 3.0L Patrol and Landcruiser 100...

It is not only the tank you have to worry about, acetone attacks some plastics. Although most parts used in the manufacturing process will stand acetone, it is not worth the risk.

Most pumps internals have tiny plastics strainers, sensors with cables, retainers, synthetic seals etc that may have not been fully tested with acetone.

WOuld you risk a $6000 pump for a few cents savings??

In diesels, acetone would also reduce the fuel's lubricity which is needed to lubricate the internal parts of the pump.

Will
AnswerID: 114785

Reply By: Member - Jeff M (WA) - Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 18:11

Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 18:11
Personally with my recent research on Biodiesel I think you would find that adding even B20 (20% Biodisel) to your tank would give you the benifits you talk about and will also be INCREASING your lubricity and clean your fuel system (as Biodiesel is a solvent) and injectors all at the same time. The other bonus would be LOWER emmisions, cleaner emmisions and using a recycled/renewable fuel.

IMHO of course.

AnswerID: 114797

Reply By: floyd - Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 18:45

Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 18:45
Noticeable improvement in my 99 Hilux diesel with aftermarket turbo. Power increase is quite staggering. I have only used 1/4 tank (115 litres) in 2 weeks so it looks as if the economy will be up somewhat. I will have an answer on fuel economy once the tank is dry..
AnswerID: 114803

Follow Up By: Member - mikeyandmary (NSW) - Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 23:57

Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 23:57
1/4 tank (115 litres)

What kind of tank/s do you have on a hilux to carry 460L of diesel????
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Follow Up By: floyd - Wednesday, Jun 08, 2005 at 12:56

Wednesday, Jun 08, 2005 at 12:56
Sorry. I didn't write it too clearly. My tank is a 115 litre Long Ranger and so far I have travelled 320 kms on 1/4 of that. so I guess I have used about 29 litres roughly. It seems better than normal milage. I will know the exact figure when the tank is empty.
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Follow Up By: Member - mikeyandmary (NSW) - Wednesday, Jun 08, 2005 at 19:04

Wednesday, Jun 08, 2005 at 19:04
Hi floyd,

No problems, just wondering though, how have you found the LR tank? I would love better range for outback trips but have always been wary of replacing the main tank. Unfortunately there doesn't seem to be a 2nd tank option for the hilux.

Keep Smiling ;-)
Michael
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Follow Up By: floyd - Thursday, Jun 09, 2005 at 11:39

Thursday, Jun 09, 2005 at 11:39
The long ranger fits really snugly where the old tank was. It is machined and shaped to contout around many of the parts like suspension hangers and chassis. It certainly is strong as it has taken a few hard knocks in the high country. It has performed perfectly for 5 years and never needed a repair. It has almost doubled the 66 litre range of the duel cab which suits me as I live a 100 km round trip from the nearest fuel station. The tank just bolted up into the original area and the fuel pick up and guage sender just bolted straight in.

As far as I know there is no additional tank for the Hilux. I am sure you could get a custom one to fit where the spare tyre is but then you have the problem of putting the tyre somewhere else. Other companies also make aftermarket tanks.

I still have the original tank if you are interested. It did a total of 70 Kms on the car and was used for 3 days only. Ot is completely clean. Going cheap.
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Reply By: Mark- Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 20:11

Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 20:11
I''ve been using Chemtech 'Diesel Power' fuel additive for a while. Reading the label, its actually based on acetone. It definitely reduces smoke, havent tried precise tests for fuel economy.
AnswerID: 114812

Reply By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 22:42

Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 22:42
"""ACETONE"""., Gee, I will have to watch my nail polish guys!!! LOL..
Patrol 4.2TDi 2003

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Get out and do something instead!

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AnswerID: 114843

Reply By: Member - Oskar (Bris) - Wednesday, Jun 08, 2005 at 10:01

Wednesday, Jun 08, 2005 at 10:01
How about methanol??
I've got 40L that I'm not going to use for it's original purpose, so does anyone know how methanol goes in diesel?
Oskar
AnswerID: 114866

Follow Up By: pathfinder - Wednesday, Jun 08, 2005 at 10:25

Wednesday, Jun 08, 2005 at 10:25
I'm sure it does, as does ethanol. However some people say that because methanol and ethanol are hydrophilic (water-attracting/bonding) they retard combustion. I always thought small amounts of water enhanced combustion in petrol motors, so I don't know. All I know is that acetone slightly enhances the cetane (equivalent to octane in petrol) rating of diesel but has a much more significant effect in enhancing atomisation/combustibility of diesel and 'advancing the flame front'. Having said that, I always thought petrol combustion was rapid burning (i.e. flame front) whereas diesel involved detonation under pressure - any experts out there?
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Follow Up By: GUPatrol - Wednesday, Jun 08, 2005 at 13:41

Wednesday, Jun 08, 2005 at 13:41
In a diesel engine, the fuel ignites spontaneously shortly after injection begins.
During this delay, the fuel is vaporizing and mixing with the air in the combustion
chamber. Combustion causes a rapid heat release and a rapid rise of
combustion chamber pressure. The rapid pressure rise is responsible for the
diesel knock that is very audible for some diesel engines.
Increasing the cetane number of the fuel can decrease the amount of knock
by shortening the ignition delay. Less fuel has been injected by the time combustion
begins and it has had less time to mix with air. As a result, the rapid
pressure rise, along with the resulting sound wave, is smaller.
One design approach to reducing combustion noise is to shape the injection –
setting the rate slow at first and then faster – to reduce the amount of fuel
entering the cylinder during the ignition delay period. Another is to use indirect-
injection

(from the diesel bible)
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Reply By: Member -Dodger - Wednesday, Jun 08, 2005 at 13:53

Wednesday, Jun 08, 2005 at 13:53
Hi all,
I use Proma products as an additive 4 my GU and it keeps the smoke down.
I have used these products in both petrol and Diesel vehicles for years and they do the job well however i have forgotten what the additive consists of.
Of course there are different products for the different fuels.
Just my 2 bobs worth.
I used to have a handle on life, but it broke.

Cheers Dodg.

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AnswerID: 114889

Reply By: GUPatrol - Wednesday, Jun 08, 2005 at 15:23

Wednesday, Jun 08, 2005 at 15:23
http://autos.groups.yahoo.com/group/pes_acetone/messages

One more source of info for those interested...
AnswerID: 114908

Reply By: floyd - Wednesday, Jun 08, 2005 at 15:53

Wednesday, Jun 08, 2005 at 15:53
Hi Pathfinder. 100 ml of acetone for 80 litres does not seem to be the reccommended dosage by the researchers of the acetone thing. According to thier research the optimum formula for diesel is 1.5 millilitres per litre of fuel. For an 80 litre tank that would be 120 ml of acetone. If you put more in the performance benefits apparently decrease. I have used this formula and it has worked for me. It appears that you are using 20% less than optimum.
AnswerID: 114913

Reply By: Member - Bradley- Thursday, Jun 09, 2005 at 17:26

Thursday, Jun 09, 2005 at 17:26
guys / girls , putting the performance or otherwise aside for a moment,

PLEASE be very carefull when dealing with acetone, as one drop in your eye will cause instant and permanent chemical blindness, not very nice...... Oh and wear nitrile gloves as well .

cheers
AnswerID: 115092

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