Non performing winch

Submitted: Tuesday, Jun 14, 2005 at 01:22
ThreadID: 23836 Views:2286 Replies:5 FollowUps:5
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Got bogged in granitic peat bog on the week end. Could nearly have heard the smile crack my face as I realized I was about to use the winch with a tree not 10 metres in front of me NO DICE I have used winches before but I couldnt pull a ghey sailor of my sister on this occasion. Ended up using the hi lift and hublifter (anyone that is relying on jacking points and doesnt have a hublifter is wasting their time!!!!) My question is the winch has been used to pull dead bushes out at home and pull it along the woolies carpark with the handbrake jammed on tö level the cable. But I wonder if the gearing factor with it holding around 50m of winch cable(over 2wice that of other winches I have used) might have effected performance given that the tree was not even 10m away. (snatch blocks are on the purchase list)
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Reply By: Trekkie - Tuesday, Jun 14, 2005 at 01:58

Tuesday, Jun 14, 2005 at 01:58
Apparently the best gearing is achieved on the first and second layer. I had a similar experience pulling two landcruisers and camper vans up the hill from Stream Beach. Backed away to extend the cable (less cable and winding layers on drum) and no problems.
AnswerID: 115636

Reply By: Kiwi Ray - Tuesday, Jun 14, 2005 at 07:27

Tuesday, Jun 14, 2005 at 07:27
Hi Davoe
At least you have the experience to try alternative methods to get out .
He is a sugestion for you snatch block on the tree in front of you, no snatch block tree trunk protector and shackle as this is not a running wire, ( this is a bit hard on the wire due to the tight bend, you can of course wrap a strap around the tree and lay the wire over it ) and run most of the wire out and annchor some where else this increases the effort of the winch.
I you had had snatch blocks you could have run three or four pulls to use up the wire.
Ground anchor is another alternative to give you some room.
The winch only pulls the maximum pull on the bottom layer of wire provided the electrics are up to it.
In NZ we tend to carry 3 or 4 blocks as we are often in heavy bush and not much room so have to get rid of wire some how.
There is always a way some times it takes a while to think outside the square.
AnswerID: 115642

Follow Up By: Kiwi Ray - Tuesday, Jun 14, 2005 at 07:33

Tuesday, Jun 14, 2005 at 07:33
Hi Davoe
I assume you were in an 80#> If they are stuck down to the chassis you will need a pull of at least the weight of the truck 2.5 ton plus 20%
I also drive 80s and they take a lot of moving when bogged.
Sorry I forgot to put my name to the above posting.
Ray
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FollowupID: 371255

Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (Widgiemooltha) - Tuesday, Jun 14, 2005 at 11:01

Tuesday, Jun 14, 2005 at 11:01
Slightly different story round here. This is the first time I have been bogged with a tre in easy reach. Snatch blocks will be bought 2day. I nearly didnt take the hi lift because of the weight and I had the winch but given it was pretty remote territory and it had been raining I thought it stupid not to. As it was I think the hi lift and reversing back out rather than a forward pull was the best option. It was only later that I thought of the gearing as it has the biggest drum on the front I have seen. I could have used a tree further away. Good thing about being bogged near a granite rock is there are heaps of big flat rocks to chuck under the wheels
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Reply By: D-Jack - Tuesday, Jun 14, 2005 at 08:28

Tuesday, Jun 14, 2005 at 08:28
Davo

Stands to reason that if the best gearing is achieved on the first couple of layers of cable (better gearing ratio) and you have 50 m which is twice as much as some, then the gearing on the outer layers (10m) will be stuffed. Maybe better off getting shorter cable and using extensions when needed.
AnswerID: 115649

Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (Widgiemooltha) - Tuesday, Jun 14, 2005 at 10:54

Tuesday, Jun 14, 2005 at 10:54
I figure snatch blocks are a better option as not only would I run the cable out further but I would get the pull reduction of the blocks
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FollowupID: 371275

Reply By: BenSpoon - Tuesday, Jun 14, 2005 at 12:07

Tuesday, Jun 14, 2005 at 12:07
Davoe-
I've got a single snatch block you can use if you want to give it a test. I got it for my hand winch which runs 18mm wire- the block seems to be for 17mm or thinner- sounds like it would suit your winch. Give us a buzz if you want it.
AnswerID: 115683

Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (Widgiemooltha) - Tuesday, Jun 14, 2005 at 13:09

Tuesday, Jun 14, 2005 at 13:09
dont want to test one just get one I know what they do just was too slack before. depending on what time you finish work are you interested in having a look at the hills near KB and maybe testing the snatch block anyway?? or if too late maybe a couple of brews and I will show you this yowie rock trip on the maps with waypoints??
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Follow Up By: BenSpoon - Tuesday, Jun 14, 2005 at 13:34

Tuesday, Jun 14, 2005 at 13:34
sounds good- Never been out that way before, so I'm keen to check it out. you may get to test your recovery points too if my 4 tonnes starts to wallow in the mud. Ill give ya a call after I knock off around 5.
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FollowupID: 371309

Reply By: traveller2 - Tuesday, Jun 14, 2005 at 15:23

Tuesday, Jun 14, 2005 at 15:23
I've actually stuck with the short cable on my winch (approx 25m, was on there when I got the vehicle), I just carry a couple of winch extension straps for the odd occasion I need more. They are much more user friendly (lighter) when climbing hills too. There is enough cable to run double snatch blocks if required.
AnswerID: 115722

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