Voltage leak in Landcruiser 80s

Submitted: Sunday, Nov 17, 2002 at 01:00
ThreadID: 2387 Views:1640 Replies:6 FollowUps:3
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I have a 93 4.2TD landcruiser 80 series with a voltage leak. I have checked through the vehicle and can not find what is flattening my battery (Main) if left for 2 days without use. One thing I did find is that the power windows are ALWAY working - Is this normal? and that the lights under the window controls are always on (Probibly my problem). Any suggestions would be appreciated as I have already Killed one battery.
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Reply By: Member - Jim - Sunday, Nov 17, 2002 at 01:00

Sunday, Nov 17, 2002 at 01:00
Kiwoka
The windows are probably where the fault is, the other way to find out what is running is to put a multimeter in line and measure the current draw. Remove and replace fuses one at a time until you find out what is drawing power.
If it can flatten your battery in a couple of days it will be something easily found.
Regards
AnswerID: 8598

Follow Up By: Kiwoka - Sunday, Nov 17, 2002 at 01:00

Sunday, Nov 17, 2002 at 01:00
When you say "in-line". how exactly do I do that?
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FollowupID: 4202

Follow Up By: Rob - Sunday, Nov 17, 2002 at 01:00

Sunday, Nov 17, 2002 at 01:00
I suggest the following.
Use a multimeter that will measure DC durrent up to 10A.
Remove + battery lead.

Put multimeter 'in-line' with battery lead by connecting red multimeter lead to + battery terminal and black lead to the + battery lead.

Measure the current.

Remove all fuses.

Measure the current as above. If it is now zero - good - you can now isolate the circuit that the current is flowing through.

In turn, push the multimeter leads into the holes for each fuse. Get + and - right first time if possible. Doing this at the fuse box means less running back and forth to the battery if its only you doing it.

Measure the current for each fuse hole. One or more of them will have a current flowing through them. Measure all - just to make sure you get them all.

Fault find on those circuits that have current flowing where it shouldn't.

In my case I would then get bleep off and give it to an auto elec. but at least you've narrowed it down and is good practice for the bush!

Have fun..
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FollowupID: 4203

Follow Up By: Janset - Monday, Nov 18, 2002 at 01:00

Monday, Nov 18, 2002 at 01:00
Rob.
That is the way that I would do it but with one exception.

Use a test light also, preferably something that has a reasonable current drag, say a stop light bulb, so you actually put a load on the test circuit.

I say this because I had a similar but reverse problem with my Engel fridge. All checked O.K. with the volt/multimeter which showed a current present of 12 point something or other volts registering.

Hours later I still could not figure out why my fridge did not work.

It was purely by accident I picked up my test light, and when I put the probes in, the light did not light up, I then I tried it again with the multimeter it showed that I had power.

As it turned out, the problem was in the cig lighter where the wires had broken, yet there must have been some contact to make a reading on the multimeter.

I think you will also find that most modern vehicles do have at all times some current drainage that is normal. Electric clock etc. or what ever. My wife Pintara, the electric fuel pump is alway active, and to change the fuel filter I have to remove a battery terminal.

Just my 5 cents worth.

Regards
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FollowupID: 4231

Reply By: Bob Y. - Sunday, Nov 17, 2002 at 01:00

Sunday, Nov 17, 2002 at 01:00
Kiwoka, The e/windows should only work with ignition ON, and if the lights are always on, I'd agree that's a good place to start. Have a 97 L/C turbo, and the electrics have always been good. As suggested, use elimination of circuits to find the culprit. Unless it very obvious how the fault has occurred, try a reputable sparky. Think Toyota lights are earth return, maybe there's a problem with e/window loom, it may have been pinched, or damaged, allowing power the switches and lights all the time. Hope you find something...

PS checked the wiring circuit for the 80 series and theres no mention of the lights in the schematic, unless they are part of the swich itself.
AnswerID: 8600

Reply By: jaap - Monday, Nov 18, 2002 at 01:00

Monday, Nov 18, 2002 at 01:00
Kiwoka
AnswerID: 8638

Reply By: jaap - Monday, Nov 18, 2002 at 01:00

Monday, Nov 18, 2002 at 01:00
Kiwoka
AnswerID: 8639

Reply By: jaap - Monday, Nov 18, 2002 at 01:00

Monday, Nov 18, 2002 at 01:00
Kiwoka
AnswerID: 8640

Reply By: jaap - Monday, Nov 18, 2002 at 01:00

Monday, Nov 18, 2002 at 01:00
Check the glow plug circuit. There are 2 solenoids in the circuit. Had one stick on and it will drain the battery in about 6 hours at which point the solenoid closes and waits patiently until it can do it again. Cost me three batteries in three months before we found the problem. The solenoid corrodes with condensation and therein lies the problem.If you have to replace buy one from an auto elec cheaper than toyota
AnswerID: 8641

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