Toyo Tyres

Submitted: Monday, Nov 18, 2002 at 01:00
ThreadID: 2396 Views:5495 Replies:6 FollowUps:4
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Does anyone have info on Toyo Tyres ? I am lead to beleive from my local tyre supplier that they are "Top of the Range" & manufactured in Japan. He is having a run out sale of them to make way for a redesigned tread pattern & offering them to me at $189 each. The size is 265/75R16 & will go onto my GU Patrol.
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Reply By: Member - Mal - Monday, Nov 18, 2002 at 01:00

Monday, Nov 18, 2002 at 01:00
Top of the Range eh!!! When he is not selling tyres he sells used cars and Real Estate. Mal T.
AnswerID: 8653

Reply By: OziExplorer - Monday, Nov 18, 2002 at 01:00

Monday, Nov 18, 2002 at 01:00
Toyo are a good tyre, and if the tread pattern is one you like and the price is ok, buy them.
All tyres have to be DOT approved and will have the DOT rating on the tyre wall. Presently I do not think there is a bad tyre brand on the market. I would not hesitate to buy Toyo tyres.

Presently on my wife's car I have some Korean brand (cannot remember the name) and soon after I bought them that model/tyre pattern were rated among the best for handling etc.
AnswerID: 8656

Reply By: colin - Monday, Nov 18, 2002 at 01:00

Monday, Nov 18, 2002 at 01:00
have just returned from a trip to birdsville and track lake ayre and plenty h/way, we had seven vehicles in the convoy. All the japanese made puntured beyond repair, the only tyres that handled the trip were aussy made bridgestones and coopers, all tyres wre either new or near new, all vehicles were also towing camper trailers. Col
AnswerID: 8658

Follow Up By: Oziexplorer - Monday, Nov 18, 2002 at 01:00

Monday, Nov 18, 2002 at 01:00
Why would a Japanese tyre be any different to any other tyre? The basic manufacturing of tyres is the same world wide. Does not matter if made in Japan, Korea, Australia etc. I normally change vehicles when I need new tyres or battery, and have never had any problems with Japanese tyres. I 4WD in some of the toughest country, and find Japanese tyres as good as any other tyre.
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FollowupID: 4223

Follow Up By: Steve L - Tuesday, Nov 19, 2002 at 01:00

Tuesday, Nov 19, 2002 at 01:00
Colin,

I think you'll find that such criteria as tyre pressures also has an important effect on how each tyre performs. When we were last out Birdsville and Lake Eyre way, all the Bridgestones we saw (many NOT even towing camper trailers like us), and were told about by the locals, were being punctured - and our BFGs, and others using BFGs, were the only ones we heard of that didn't have any problems.

Making a general statement about which tyres survive outback use tends to cloud the issues a little. You need to take all factors into account. I also agree that if there was a bad tyre out there it wouldn't last long in the market. Personal preference, especially in terms of previous experience, is another thing completely though....
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Follow Up By: Colin - Tuesday, Nov 19, 2002 at 01:00

Tuesday, Nov 19, 2002 at 01:00
Steve, not all bridgestones are made in aussy and there is a difference in aussy made and japanse made. We did do all the right pressure allowances. When we checked the inside of the punctured tyre we found that only a very small sliver of stone had pierced the tread but it completly split the inside beyond repair. Also not all tyers are made the same, they are made to the australian standard but thats where it ends. Take the aussy bridgestone and the cooper, one is a radial and the other is a bias case. Another thing we noticed is the aussy bridgy had a chip factor were the coopers had none, they looked as they had been running on bithumen for the full 12,ooo ks, have seen bfg,s do the same trip and were horribly chipped out but lasted the trip without a puncture.To me when you have a conyoy of vehicles all with different tyres and the only ones that couldnt handle it were jap made tyres, i think that speaks for itself. One of the campers had 12 inch rims with aussy made car tyres on and they never punctured but did wear out. Col
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FollowupID: 4250

Reply By: Truckster - Tuesday, Nov 19, 2002 at 01:00

Tuesday, Nov 19, 2002 at 01:00
[i]Oziexplorer posted this followup
Why would a Japanese tyre be any different to any other tyre? The basic manufacturing of tyres is the same world wide.
[/i]


Not so true...
Different compounds, and quality control... Your saying Cheng Shins are quality of Pirelli, Michelin etc?? Thats why you pay more for some tires.....

And like things made in Tawian... Not good quality compared..
AnswerID: 8686

Follow Up By: Dean - Tuesday, Nov 19, 2002 at 01:00

Tuesday, Nov 19, 2002 at 01:00
Truckster, as the others have said, all tyres are built to industry standards.

The Maximum cold inflation pressure on the sidewall will tell the strength,

35psi-standard load P
44psi-extra load P
51psi C rated LT
65psi D rated LT
80psi E rated LT

Dean
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FollowupID: 4247

Reply By: Dean - Tuesday, Nov 19, 2002 at 01:00

Tuesday, Nov 19, 2002 at 01:00
Cam, Presuming you are talking about the OPAT, they are obviously having some kind of sale as my local tyre dealer has them in my size, 265/70/16, normally around $250/260, on sale at the moment for $215.

Dean
AnswerID: 8701

Reply By: Phil G - Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00

Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00
This year we had a group of 12 vehicles do the tracks you mentioned including crossing the Simpson and had zero punctures. Have had similar experiences on many of our club trips. I think the secrets are:
1. Run low pressures as soon as you leave the bitumen (like 24psi) (ever tried puncturing a half-full balloon)
2. Keep your speed down
3. Don't overload your vehicle
4. Run with at least 50% tread.
Brand is of secondary importance.

Phil G
AnswerID: 8778

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