Air jack - is this a useful tool

Submitted: Thursday, Jun 23, 2005 at 17:39
ThreadID: 24113 Views:2441 Replies:8 FollowUps:6
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I am (slowly) gearing up and have been looking tha best type of jack to get for car and camper trailer. Are exhaust driven bag-type jacks a useful all-round bit of equipment? Any suggested brands?
cheers,
Dave
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Reply By: Willem - Thursday, Jun 23, 2005 at 17:54

Thursday, Jun 23, 2005 at 17:54
In a moment of lapse I bought a Mean Green Bullbag(Opposite Lock) in 2002 mainly as I was sick and tired of carrying the Hi lift jack around. Have never used the bag. But it rides along just in case. This is possibly due to the fact that I have a winch and can extricate myself from a sticky situation.

The bullbags are all pretty much the same concept so I couldnt advise on brand preference

If you have space, carry a trolley jack which is far more adaptable and useful
AnswerID: 117098

Follow Up By: Wizard1 - Friday, Jun 24, 2005 at 12:04

Friday, Jun 24, 2005 at 12:04
Winches aren't much good without an anchor point.............
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Reply By: Member -Dodger - Thursday, Jun 23, 2005 at 17:56

Thursday, Jun 23, 2005 at 17:56
Exhaust jacks are good.
But often it is more practical to have a good bottle jack or a small trolly jack.
If you have the room go for a small trolley jack. They come in handy cases.
I used to have a handle on life, but it broke.

Cheers Dodg.

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AnswerID: 117100

Reply By: Member - Troll 81 (QLD) - Thursday, Jun 23, 2005 at 17:58

Thursday, Jun 23, 2005 at 17:58
I love my airjack and has come in very handy, but a high lift jack is also very good
AnswerID: 117102

Reply By: Pluto - Thursday, Jun 23, 2005 at 18:21

Thursday, Jun 23, 2005 at 18:21
I don't bother carrying a Hilift Jack. The Exhaust Jack is Lighter, more compact and (arguably) safer to use. Especially when the ground is soft. ie. Mud or sand.
AnswerID: 117105

Follow Up By: Max - Sydney - Thursday, Jun 23, 2005 at 19:54

Thursday, Jun 23, 2005 at 19:54
Ozidave

When I read your question, I thought I would be one out in saying the bull bag is the way to go. I was pleased to see that there are others who agree - my answer is the same as Pluto's - a highlift jack takes a lot of space and weight, and a bull bag is all you need.

There can be people - who do the extreme stuff - for whom the high lift is needed. But in my experience of outback travel in some rough places - the bull bag is enough.

For what it is worth
Max
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Reply By: Rob from Cairns Offroad Training & Tours - Thursday, Jun 23, 2005 at 20:42

Thursday, Jun 23, 2005 at 20:42
If you use a exhaust bag on any sort of a slope your car will just slide off it. A good hydraulic jack and backing plate is a better all round option. Cheers Rob
AnswerID: 117118

Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (Widgiemooltha) - Thursday, Jun 23, 2005 at 21:50

Thursday, Jun 23, 2005 at 21:50
only for changing tyres. When bogged or hung up and you need to lift wheels 60+ centremeters nothing beats a hi lift with jacking plate and hublifter for reliable performance. I carry 1 factory jack, one trolly jack and if going remote also the highlift. Trolley jacks are pretty crap when used on dirt as they dont "roll" and will fall off as they are jacked up and the arm moves but are good for swapping the bush and bitumen tyres
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Reply By: ozidave - Thursday, Jun 23, 2005 at 21:44

Thursday, Jun 23, 2005 at 21:44
Thanks everyone for your help - some very useful contributions.
cheers,
Dave
AnswerID: 117137

Follow Up By: mfewster - Thursday, Jun 23, 2005 at 22:24

Thursday, Jun 23, 2005 at 22:24
Air bag jacks are good, But, be very sure you have no holes in your exhaust system. Completely useless if exhaust leaks at all.
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FollowupID: 372614

Reply By: vitara - Friday, Jun 24, 2005 at 10:31

Friday, Jun 24, 2005 at 10:31
Hi Ozidave, have heard that these are only useful on diesels not petrol as the oxygen sensor can be damaged by pressure building up in exhaust system when you are trying to pump up the air jack causing back pressure and excess heat.My matesbleepit's self cost him $600 at toyota just for the part alone.Thats what toyota told him that it was from the excess heat built up. Maybe it was ready to sh@it it's self anyway.Don't know if anybody else has come accross this problem or not, but my mate has not used it since. Hence I now own one.Brillant specially in the sand or dirt/mud. My'n is a 2.8 diesel (slug but gets me where I want to go) just a little slower. Take Care Vitara
AnswerID: 117221

Follow Up By: Member - Jeff M (WA) - Friday, Jun 24, 2005 at 14:04

Friday, Jun 24, 2005 at 14:04
Nah crap, I used my exuast jack for years on my EFI Feroza without any problems, in fact the Ferzoa didn't even HAVE a bottle jack so I used the exaust jack for everything. I used it on bitchumen, gravel, concrete (at a servo). I used it to unstick my rocky (2.1 Tonne) when I was bogged in sand, and it now rides around in the surf (never used it in the surf yet) but I reckon they are awsome and 5,000000 times more practical than a high lift.

It's the usual storey with these, People who knock'em don't seem to own them. It's always a mate, or someone on a trip who had trouble with them...

If you position them right they could potentially roll your vehicle over they go that high.
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FollowupID: 372678

Follow Up By: Member - Troll 81 (QLD) - Friday, Jun 24, 2005 at 14:34

Friday, Jun 24, 2005 at 14:34
Crap indeed. I have used mine about 6 times now and I have no dramas
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FollowupID: 372681

Reply By: Member - Camper (SA) - Friday, Jun 24, 2005 at 23:41

Friday, Jun 24, 2005 at 23:41
Never used mine in anger but when practicing in the driveway the lift was awesome and under the spare (carried underslung at the back) I could lift the whole arse end and move it sideways.
Camper
AnswerID: 117350

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