Camper Trailer - Anderson Plugs

Submitted: Thursday, Jun 30, 2005 at 14:47
ThreadID: 24324 Views:2309 Replies:4 FollowUps:5
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Hi
We have a Camper Trailer with a Battery Charger and Cranking Battery already set up in the trailer..came new like this. We have an auxliary Battery in the Pajero, mainly for the 50 lt Waceo Fridge. There is an Anderson Plug that charges both batteries whilst driving.
My question is can I make up a lead to run from the Camper Trailer to my vehicle and plug in whilst staying at powered caravan park sites. Just say a 5 metre lead, rather than have to connect the Trailer each time. If this ispossible I already have suffiecient 50 amp cable I could use. I know a heavier cable would be better but will the 50 amp cable suffice.
Thanks for any help anyone can offer.
Stan
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Reply By: Member - Ray - Thursday, Jun 30, 2005 at 17:06

Thursday, Jun 30, 2005 at 17:06
Yes Stan, we have the same type of set up and it works really well.I also have an anderson plug on the battery charger so I can have the charger under the patio at home and trickle charge the camper batteryvia the long lead (make sure it is of a large enough diameter cable) to prolong its life.
Ray
AnswerID: 118278

Follow Up By: Stanm - Thursday, Jun 30, 2005 at 17:27

Thursday, Jun 30, 2005 at 17:27
Ray
Thanks for your responce. The idea appeals to me, particularly if we stop for a few days near a powered site. My main concerns is whether or not the 50 amp cable I have will be large enough to carry the load !
Stan
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Follow Up By: drivesafe - Friday, Jul 01, 2005 at 00:25

Friday, Jul 01, 2005 at 00:25
Hi Stanm, do you know the actual size of the cable, EG is it 4.5mm2 or is it 6mm automotive cable.

The two sizes I have listed are both rated at 50 amps and it so although this size cable would work, the problem is that the lower the battery in the trailer is charged, the more amps required to charge it and the 6mm cable will cause a few sort of a voltage drop.

If you can, try going up to at least 8 B&S, this is 8mm2 and will fit into the Anderson terminals.

Cheers.
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Reply By: Stanm - Friday, Jul 01, 2005 at 08:36

Friday, Jul 01, 2005 at 08:36
Drivesafe
I bought a fair length of Automotive Cable that was said to be 6mm and was told it was rated at 50 amps. I'm not overly concerned if there is a slight voltage drop. I guess the real question is, will this cable (rated at 50 amps) be at least 90% effective as a thicker cable and, can the use of say this 6mm (50 amps) cause any problems other than a slight drop in voltage.
Stan
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Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Friday, Jul 01, 2005 at 09:05

Friday, Jul 01, 2005 at 09:05
Stanm ,the one thing you should be worried about is voltage drop ,lose the volts thru too thin a cable [heat loss] and you wont recharge your batt anywhere near effectivly as you could/should.
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Follow Up By: Member - Collyn R (WA) - Friday, Jul 01, 2005 at 10:12

Friday, Jul 01, 2005 at 10:12
A cables 'amp' rating is only an indication of how hot it gets before it's insulation melts. It tells you nothing whatever about voltage drop.

In practice '50 amp cable' is likely to be 4 mm auto cable (2.0 sq mm) or 6 mm auto cable (4.6 sq mm).

Assuming max current flow of (say) 20 amps, the voltage drop across five metres (10 metres of conductor) of either will be a totally unacceptable 1.7 volts, and 0.74 volts respectively.

The minimum you need is so-called 8-gauge (also known as 8 AWG or 8 B&S and also 8 sq mm). This results in a drop of 0.425 volts. Still a bit high but fine at lower current draw.
Trust this helps
Collyn Rivers
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Reply By: Stanm - Friday, Jul 01, 2005 at 11:06

Friday, Jul 01, 2005 at 11:06
Collyn
Thanks for your reply. I guess it's a case if I'm going to make up a lead, I may as well do it properly the first time and use 8-guage. It may save a lot hassles later.
Thanks for all your responces.
Stan
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AnswerID: 118388

Follow Up By: drivesafe - Friday, Jul 01, 2005 at 16:47

Friday, Jul 01, 2005 at 16:47
Hi Stan, there is another consideration. At this time you may not be going to be pulling much power but down the road you may invest in some additional accessories and it would pay you to go to the thicker wire now rather than have to make up a newer, heavier lead later.

Anderson plug 50 amp terminals will accept up to 6 B&S so you could use any one of three commonly available sizes, 8 B&S ( 8mm2 ), 10mm2 or 6 B&S ( 13.5mm2 ).

Although, usually much more expensive, you can usually get these wire sizes in twin sheathed. This looks better and easier to handle and maintain.

Cheers and let us know how you get on.
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Reply By: Stanm - Friday, Jul 01, 2005 at 17:30

Friday, Jul 01, 2005 at 17:30
Thanks Drivesafe. I will proberly follow your advice.
Stan
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AnswerID: 118437

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