Pajero the right choice?

Submitted: Monday, Nov 25, 2002 at 01:00
ThreadID: 2457 Views:1926 Replies:11 FollowUps:12
This Thread has been Archived
My wife and I are thinking of a round-Oz trip sometime down the track. Consequently, we are in the market for our first 4 wheeler.
The first year is suck-it-and-see. The car will be spending most of its time batting about the Eastern Suburbs with a few trips to maybe the Blue Mountains to get some experience in off road conditions (we've been told that joining a club is highly recommended if not compulsory for us neophytes).
After 12 months we feel that we should have more experience to know what suits us better. But for now, all we need is something that will get us there and back on some pretty straightforward trips.
We've checked out a few models and are thinking about a Pajero ($20 -25k). Apart from the fact that it's Spanish slang for 'wanker', would this be a good choice for a couple of newbies like us?
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: OziExplorer - Monday, Nov 25, 2002 at 01:00

Monday, Nov 25, 2002 at 01:00
You may like to ask here as well.
Queensland Pajero Club Forum.
http://www.pajeroclub.com.au/forum/

Yes, they will even communicate with cockroaches!
AnswerID: 8929

Reply By: Nifty,, - Monday, Nov 25, 2002 at 01:00

Monday, Nov 25, 2002 at 01:00
Wozza,
as an entry vehicle it's a mighty fine choice.
I've just sold one and it went fine, I think there are nicer trucks out there but to begin with a Paj is a good place to start .
AnswerID: 8941

Reply By: Member - Melissa - Monday, Nov 25, 2002 at 01:00

Monday, Nov 25, 2002 at 01:00
Hi Wozza,

12 months ago we sold our NH Pajero in favour of a newer Patrol. The Paj was a great truck which carried us and our gear, and towed an offroad campertrailer, all over the NT and WA without a hiccup. It is certainly a good choice of vehicle for you.

Only real problem we had was lack of front end clearance. It is possible to get a rear end suspension lift, we which did, but not a lot you can do with the front end except wind up your torsion bars, which we also did but we found it made the ride too harsh so had to experiment a bit to reach a satisfactory compromise between ride comfort and clearance. We also removed the side steps which had a tendency to get hooked up. But overall, once you get to know your vehicle, these are only minor problems and I haven't come across a 4WD yet that wasn't a compromise on one point or other. Incidently, I was sold on Pajero's when I hitched a ride in one for a Cape York trip back in 1988. Handled the conditions very well and kept up with the big 4WD's no worries.

Re: getting some 4WD experience in the Blue Mountains and joining a club...good idea! However, for a round Oz trip you will also need plenty of sand 4WDriving experience so make sure you work in a few beach/dune driving trips.

Have fun!

:o) Melissa
AnswerID: 8942

Reply By: voxson - Monday, Nov 25, 2002 at 01:00

Monday, Nov 25, 2002 at 01:00
Hi, I own a patrol so i am bias to them but all in all i have found that any 4x4 ( patrol, pajero, landcruiser ) are virtually all the same to me. They all drive on and off road, they are all reasonably comfortable and they all drink petrol like it is going out of fashion. Landcruiser, Patrol, Pajero in that order from worst to not so worst.

Landcruiser = approx 20litres per 100km
Patrol = approx 18litres per 100km
Pajero = Not sure

My friend owns a 2.8L turbo diesel landrover discovery which is absolutely great on fuel economy approx 11 litres per 100km but it cost him over $1000 for a service including a timing belt which i spose makes up for the good fuel economy.

So for just blasting around the Blue Mountains with city driving i would probably buy a Petrol / Gas Patrol - Mid 90's model with 100ish thousand k's on the clock if that is possible.

If you are going remote i would buy a diesel.

AnswerID: 8944

Follow Up By: Oziexplorer - Monday, Nov 25, 2002 at 01:00

Monday, Nov 25, 2002 at 01:00
Wow, I am glad my Triton 2.8L diesel does not guzzle fuel like the Landcruiser or Patrol.
My Triton averages between 8 to 9 litres per 100km. A round trip on the highway to Melbourne is 700km. I filled up on Friday before I left, and have not filled up yet. The tank holds 69 litres.
0
FollowupID: 4447

Follow Up By: Voxson - Monday, Nov 25, 2002 at 01:00

Monday, Nov 25, 2002 at 01:00
Hiya Ozi... I hope i did my sums right...

I have a range of 400kms on 80 litres of ULP.

Oh,, It is actually worse......

And my car is in quite a good state of tune....
New air filter, plugs etc etc......

And a range of 350kms on 87litres of LPG and these are under absolutely perfect conditions.
0
FollowupID: 4449

Follow Up By: Steve L - Tuesday, Nov 26, 2002 at 01:00

Tuesday, Nov 26, 2002 at 01:00
Voxson,

Quoting fuel consumption figures like that is extremely misleading. I have an 80 series petrol manual, and unless I'm flooring it off the lights, doing long stretches at well over 100km/h or towing the camper trailier, I don't get anywhere near 20 litres per 100km. It's usually between 15 and 16.

Using your figures I'm glad I drive a Landcruiser rather than a Patrol!
0
FollowupID: 4456

Follow Up By: Voxson - Tuesday, Nov 26, 2002 at 01:00

Tuesday, Nov 26, 2002 at 01:00
Heya Steve. Misleading?....

When i go to the servo to fill up i count the litres which have gone into the tank and i count the little numbers on my odometer.

I am not a young skid the wheels hoon so i would be getting near the best mileage there is to get from the vehicle.

When i was looking around for my current 4x4 i checked test drives after test drives and i cant remember seeing an 80 series petrol cruiser that could return 15 - 16 litres per 100......
0
FollowupID: 4467

Follow Up By: Member - Melissa - Tuesday, Nov 26, 2002 at 01:00

Tuesday, Nov 26, 2002 at 01:00
Our 3.5L Paj got about 18L/100km's loaded with a roof rack and towing an offroad campertrailer. We have found it very comparable to our 4.5L GU Patrol, no roof rack and towing same offroad campertrailer.

:-) Melissa
0
FollowupID: 4471

Follow Up By: Steve L - Wednesday, Nov 27, 2002 at 01:00

Wednesday, Nov 27, 2002 at 01:00
Voxson,

Exactly the way I do it - count the litres and check the odometer. Sounds like either the car needed a good service and tune up or else there were other factors not taken into account (a/c on?). Even with 2 full tanks of fuel (270 litres - i.e. around 270kgs) plus the weight of the drawer system, intermittent use of the a/c and driving hard in the city, my car averages 500kms on the 'main' 95 litre tank. By my reckoning, that's 19 litres/100km, and as I don't usually drive with all that weight, or in a leadfooted manner, I stand by my 15 odd litres statement. I expect you might also have been driving an auto? These, for every type of car, have a heavier consumption of fuel than a manual.
0
FollowupID: 4503

Follow Up By: Voxson - Wednesday, Nov 27, 2002 at 01:00

Wednesday, Nov 27, 2002 at 01:00
Steve,

I have always got my patrol in a good state of tune & it is a manual but i must admit that i have had the a/c on a fair bit lately.

When you are using petrol then gas, a/c on and a/c off,,,,,the power and the lack of is always changing so i didnt even think of the a/c being a major factor...

How much difference does it make?.. Have you ever calculated it?
0
FollowupID: 4528

Follow Up By: Steve L - Friday, Nov 29, 2002 at 01:00

Friday, Nov 29, 2002 at 01:00
Voxson,

Gotta try to remember what my reply was before it got lost!

I remember reading that fuel consumption as a general rule goes up around 10% with the a/c on. Never tried to 'officially' check this, but going by consumption on some long trips through hot parts wit hthe a/c on a fair bit, I'd say that's about right.

Can't comment on gas as I don't use it.

A friend of mine who had another 4500i 80 series - auto though, as opposed to my manual - always drove with the a/c on (never ever turned it off), and his consumption around the suburbs was around 22-25l/100km. Pretty sedate driver, and some of that increase could be attributed to the auto tranny, but certainly not all of it.

Will have to try to calculate the a/c figures during the summer, and see what I get.
0
FollowupID: 4552

Reply By: Truckster - Tuesday, Nov 26, 2002 at 01:00

Tuesday, Nov 26, 2002 at 01:00
Apart from the fact that it's Spanish slang for 'wanker'

I dont believe people still believe this.

Pajs are good cars, older original ones suck. BUt late model ones are honest. They wont set the world on fire, but go test drive one and see.


theres lots of other cars around that $. GQ/GU/80 Series etc.. These 3 would be better for offroading than the Paj for longer trips by a long shot.
Also more accessories available for the 3 above second hand over the Paj.

Another thing to think of is break downs and Spare parts in remote areas. If you arent carrying them, they have to be in a shop somewhere you are going, or you will have to wait for them to be brought in..


Just a thought.
AnswerID: 8973

Follow Up By: Member - Melissa - Tuesday, Nov 26, 2002 at 01:00

Tuesday, Nov 26, 2002 at 01:00
Hmmm...Truckster, in this case I'd have to say you are misinformed. The Paj is very well suited to long range touring. My comments are based on actual experience (see my post above) having owned a Paj for 3 1/2 years and done a lot of touring and offroading.

We now own a GU Patrol and I can say in all honesty, there isn't a single stand-out feature between the two makes. Both very capable and very comfortable. Our decision to buy a Patrol over a Paj was quite simple. We wanted a car with a bit more grunt than our 3.5L Paj had. Could have achieved this with a new model Pajero, but we didn't like what Mitsubishi have done to them aesthetically. Pure and simple.

Re: accessories. Our Paj was well set up with bullbar, DBSystem, ARB roofrack, rear storage unit, snorkel, suspension lift, air compressor, spotties, side steps (which we removed) and the usual array of headlight protectors, seat covers, dash mats etc etc. LR fuels tanks and water tanks are available but we never bothered to fit them. What more do you want???

As for spare parts, we never had any trouble getting what we needed but then again, the Paj never let us down. Don't forget that they were the biggest selling medium sized 4WD for years. In remote areas, regardless of what you drive and depending on the part you need, you will more than likely have to wait it out anyway. Just a fact of life with remote area travel.

:-) Melissa
0
FollowupID: 4470

Follow Up By: Truckster - Tuesday, Nov 26, 2002 at 01:00

Tuesday, Nov 26, 2002 at 01:00
We now own a GU Patrol and I can say in all honesty, there isn't a single stand-out feature between the two makes.

Coil Suspension, ride comfort, power, looks (over latest model), availablity of second hand accessories, interior space..

I test drove a Paj and 80 series one straight after the other, and couldnt fit in that Paj, was not lastest shape the one before that.


We wanted a car with a bit more grunt than our 3.5L Paj had. Could have achieved this with a new model Pajero, but we didn't like what Mitsubishi have done to them aesthetically. Pure and simple.

I dont know many that do like the latest Paj! Butt ugly! And a 3.0 Patrol would toast a new model paj

0
FollowupID: 4473

Reply By: flappan - Tuesday, Nov 26, 2002 at 01:00

Tuesday, Nov 26, 2002 at 01:00
The Pajeros are a great vehicle and IMO the best touring 4wd around. They aren't the choice as "mums taxis" for no reason.

As a newbie this is a good starting point. Join a club and get comfortable with it. You will be surprised where the PJ's actually go.

FWIW though, even though I drive a PJ, I would consider looking at a Patrol as well. These do have better offroad abilities, but you may not really need those extra abilities anyway.

Drive a few. Test drive a Pajero, Patrol, and a Cruiser. Maybe even a Jackaroo. They probably fit just between the PJ's and Patrols/Cruisers for their ability.
AnswerID: 8982

Follow Up By: Oziexplorer - Tuesday, Nov 26, 2002 at 01:00

Tuesday, Nov 26, 2002 at 01:00
The surveyors and geologists in the business next door but one have tried all 4WD's and they keep coming back to Pajeros. The only other vehicles they have is Suzuki. They are out in 4WD rough country every day, and often two or three days at a time. I cannot believe the places I have discovered them when I have been out prospecting on my motorbike.
0
FollowupID: 4480

Follow Up By: Sapper - Saturday, Nov 30, 2002 at 01:00

Saturday, Nov 30, 2002 at 01:00
I have been driving 4Wd for some 40 years and for comfort have not come across a better mid range 4x4 than a PAJ. I have owned one for the past 3 1/2 years NL EFI. Second hand around $29K. It has been on sand, sand dunes, rocks, mud and as soon as it feels the transfer case locked in it drops the straw in a drinks like christ.

On the highway, (I have HICLONE, UNIFILTER and Genie Headers), I average around 10.5 L/100Km at touring speed. Gets down to 14 L/100 Km when towing a trailer (around 800kg). I am looking at the new diesel however I have heard some disappointing issues with the suspension on the Gibb Road type country. Then again it is easy to fit after market suspension. Go to www.motorcare.com and click on Project Pajero. You can also ask all the questions you like. They have now owned several Pajeros and prepared them for long distance touring.
0
FollowupID: 4581

Reply By: Slunnie - Tuesday, Nov 26, 2002 at 01:00

Tuesday, Nov 26, 2002 at 01:00
I would also check out the Prado. It should be the equal of the Pajero, though may have better clearance for offroading and with the extra fuel capacity it will go further without the need to carry jerry cans. Being a Toyota it may also cost extra..
Regards
Slunnie
AnswerID: 9014

Reply By: Mike - Wednesday, Nov 27, 2002 at 01:00

Wednesday, Nov 27, 2002 at 01:00
Wozza, For what you are planning, the Paj will do the job admirably. Don't discount either Prado or Jackaroo, They are really clones and have a terrific reputation for their ability. I would strongly reccommend a T/D over petrol though for your long trip, especially if you tow anything, for torque and economy. I have just completed a 24000+ km trip through the outback, towing a Kimberly Kamper, and My Jackaroo handled it really well, but I would use a deisel next time. We averaged about 23lt/100kms, while towing, as apposed to it's normal of about 15/100 empty. Any of these trucks will supply all the fun times, so good luck with your choice and Happy (4WD) trails, MIke.
AnswerID: 9038

Reply By: Joe - Thursday, Nov 28, 2002 at 01:00

Thursday, Nov 28, 2002 at 01:00
Wozza,

There is often a heap of bull spread around by people who seem to have a lot of axes to grind, and you have seen some of it here.

For what it’s worth, here are my thoughts on the question:

All of the “real” 4WDs on the market over the past ten years are more than capable of driving around Australia, so yes – the Pajero will fir that bill.

Each vehicle has its strengths and you should consider your probable use before you make a choice.

For example, the Patrol (closely followed by the LandCruiser) is the best heavy duty 4WD on the market. It has strengths in off road work (wheel travel and a very strong drivetrain) that also work against it in on road work. The weight of the front axle compromises handling for example.

So, if you were planning on a lot of heavy duty off road work I would suggest that you buy the Patrol, or the LandCruiser if you simply have to throw extra money at something.

The Pajero has a different front suspension system (and different rear suspension if you buy one made in the last two years) that makes its on road handling far superior to the Patrol/Cruiser, but it loses out to those vehicles in real off road work.

The Pajero is also a slightly smaller machine, so it fits the bill for city traffic use somewhat better as well.

So, if your trip around Australia is going to be focussed on roads then the Pajero would be a fine choice.

BTW – when I say “roads” I include all bitumen, gravel and clay roads as well as any formed track or beach work. It is really only when facing rock scrambles and really deeply washed out areas that the comparative lack of front wheel travel is a disadvantage.

You should note that the Jackaroo, Prado, Jeep Grand Cherokee and Musso etc would also fit the same bill quite admirably.

(and yes, I DO know that the Jeep has a solid front axle).

Good luck in whatever you choose, but I repeat that the Pajero will do the touring job completely comfortably and safely. The only downside that I can see are the comments that you will inevitably receive from the sad and ignorant about “Mum’s Taxi”.
AnswerID: 9067

Reply By: Truckster - Thursday, Nov 28, 2002 at 01:00

Thursday, Nov 28, 2002 at 01:00
4x4 aussie has a writeup on the Paj this month...

Also the V8 Cruiser is back.
AnswerID: 9069

Reply By: dougie - Sunday, Dec 29, 2002 at 01:00

Sunday, Dec 29, 2002 at 01:00
i took mine to thye gulf and cape york and lived on the wenlock for 7 months,
I am rapped it is 4 years old now and has 120,00 k,s
we dragged a heavy trailer and a s--t load of stuff.I only put back brakes on recently and have not spent a sack on it.
love it!! though it was not my prefered at the time of purchase, but will go back again and again,
AnswerID: 10287

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)