How do you keep warm while sleeping?

Submitted: Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 21:09
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I am preparing for a 5 night camping trip soon and I expect fairly cold nights.
I have always done most of my camping in the warmer months so have not had to face this situtation before.
What is the best combination and why?
Airbed on ground, foam mattress on ground (swag), stretcher off the ground etc
all of these will be inside a canvas tent of course.
Your ideas and advise please.
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Reply By: Truckster (Vic) - Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 21:14

Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 21:14
lots between your airbed and ground - a few travel blankets... cold rises from the ground into air bed, freezes yor arze...

Good sleeping bag and sleep in clothes.

12v electric blanket

also the realdoll to cuddle helps.
AnswerID: 121507

Follow Up By: GaryInOz (Vic) - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 10:04

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 10:04
No airbed, sleep on a self inflating mattress on a camp stretcher.

Dont strip off to get in pyjamas or anything else, sleep in your clothes (they are already warm, you will lose a lot of body heat by changing into other clothes). Lots of thin layers are better than one thick layer. No coffee (diuretic, makes you want to pee, another loss of body heat). For the guys, have a one litre wide mouthed bottle near your bed (no jokes about it not fitting, if it's THAT cold, it will fit. LOL).

Have a read through some army survival technique information.
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Follow Up By: hilux bert - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 14:28

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 14:28
you're all just soft. i only got halfway through the thread and got the sheets! anyway, thermarest (or other brand) and descent sleeping bag. works on snow it'll work on ground. if your cold put clothes on if you're hot take clothes off. and use the hood in the bag, it works.

oh and the port is best warmer of all.
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Reply By: Oleg - Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 21:23

Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 21:23
12v blanket does good job.
Make sure you have low voltage cut-off device between the blanket and your second battery.

Once had 2 blankets connected without low voltage cut-off and had to replace the battery after the trip.
AnswerID: 121509

Reply By: Mad Dog (Australia) - Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 21:26

Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 21:26
When it's real cold use a hot water bottle. I never leave home without one.
AnswerID: 121510

Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 21:43

Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 21:43
Yeah ray , two hot water bottles in a double sleeping bag, you wont be cold.
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Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 10:01

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 10:01
OHH and if you have a hot partner, remove one of the hot water bottles!!!
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Follow Up By: Mad Dog (Australia) - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 10:14

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 10:14
With a HOT partner I wouldn't expect to use any hot water bottles :)
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Reply By: KiwiAngler - Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 21:29

Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 21:29
Beanie....hot water bottle...-5c sleeping bag....roftop tent.....foam mattress
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Reply By: Cracka - Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 21:33

Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 21:33
Rooftop tent, four inch foam mattress, two doonas and a double sleeping bag ova the lot, oh and ahhh, sleep naked! Just don't get up to pee! He he he he
Cracka
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AnswerID: 121514

Follow Up By: Member - Chrispy (NSW) - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 09:40

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 09:40
Hear hear!

The rooftop tent is just brilliant in cold climates. The thing that cools you down most is the ground... and it you're 7 foot off it - it's warm up there :)
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Follow Up By: GaryInOz (Vic) - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 10:09

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 10:09
"...and ahhh, sleep naked!..."

BAD ADVICE!!!!

Only to be done if someone is suffering from hypothermia and need to be warmed using your body heat.

Take the subject seriously, it could cost someone their life.
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Follow Up By: Member - Pezza (QLD) - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 20:48

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 20:48
Don't suppose theres any chance of Mimi Mcpherson catching hypothermia while I'm around then?

Avagoodn
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Reply By: Exploder - Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 21:35

Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 21:35
Just add one more.

When you think that you have got the swag set up for cold wether; put in another rug just encase, you will probably need it. Have made that mistake 2 times now and it is getting a little annoying.
AnswerID: 121517

Reply By: Member - Browny (VIC) - Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 21:48

Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 21:48
loughma,

What ever you do don't go the air matress option in cold weather, I reckon there imposible to get warm in cold weather, I'm sure ther'll be a few on here that have "solutions" to keeping warm on them, but the amount of ground sheets woolen underlays etc required to keep your body away from the cold air is not practical.....IMO

Browny
AnswerID: 121518

Reply By: The Explorer - Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 21:53

Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 21:53
Hello - a lot can be learnt from bushwalkers who are limited in what they can carry - while some of the gear is expensive it not only saves space/weight but keeps you warm as toast. You obviously already have a tent so aim for best sleeping bag and thermal underwear. As you will be in a car don’t compromise on mattress (if you have good sleeping bag/clothes it will make no noticeable difference with respect to warmth). If you get cold you have brought the wrong sleeping bag/thermals...or your tent has blown over and it’s raining/snowing.
Cheers
Greg
I sent one final shout after him to stick to the track, to which he replied “All right,” That was the last ever seen of Gibson - E Giles 23 April 1874

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AnswerID: 121520

Follow Up By: The Explorer - Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 21:56

Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 21:56
Almost forgot - several swigs of Port.
I sent one final shout after him to stick to the track, to which he replied “All right,” That was the last ever seen of Gibson - E Giles 23 April 1874

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Follow Up By: gramps - Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 22:07

Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 22:07
That's the secret ..................... then have a few more to be sure, to be sure!
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Follow Up By: BLUEBAG53 - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 01:14

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 01:14
Followed by several swigs of starboard to be sure to keep an even keel! To be sure!
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Follow Up By: gramps - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 02:05

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 02:05
Onya Bluebag53 .... won't even have to worry about doonas, sleeping bags, blankets etc. Central heating in a bottle !
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Follow Up By: rob&kev&roo - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 09:59

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 09:59
alcohol lowers body temperature
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Follow Up By: gramps - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 13:35

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 13:35
Aaaaah rob&kev&roo never ruin a good yarn with facts LOL
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Reply By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 21:54

Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 21:54
Really small tent to ensure limited loss of heat. Double skin job (fly).

6 inch foam mattress to keep your clacker off the ground and provide some insulation.

A GOOD doona over the top of you and wear your tracky dacks to bed. You'll wake up in the middle of the night hot.

If it's really cold, put a "space blanket" (one of those alfoil sheets you can get at a cheapo shop for about $2.50, called an emergency blanket) over the top of you. Then you'll really cook.

Cheers,

Jim.

AnswerID: 121521

Follow Up By: gramps - Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 22:09

Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 22:09
Jim,

Re your signature: And HR are the spotters!!!
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Follow Up By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 22:32

Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 22:32
Gramps,

Ii actually did my tertiary studies in HR (it was called Personnel in those days). I bailed out soon thereafter when it became HR and went fluffy.

I now do battle with auditors, on behalf of my company, to try to achieve a balance between compliance and business needs.

Cheers,

Jim.
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Follow Up By: gramps - Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 22:40

Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 22:40
Whoooops! Hang on while I extricate one foot out of my mouth....

Nothing like dealing with auditors. No wonder you like to get away from it all.
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Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic)&Moses - Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 22:47

Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 22:47
Agree with you Jimbo about the mattress and the doona. When I didn't have a heavy cold camping last year I needed the side of the camper box open to keep me cooler. We actually don't use an insulating layer often - the fly I mean.

Jimbo, you must be one of the types that provides me with the information so I can comply too, with the business need. I still need to keep friends with the auditors, as the bankers, marketing, processing too and the rest of the supply chain.
Cheers,
Who?
John

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Follow Up By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 07:55

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 07:55
Gramps,

Don't worry about the foot mate. The quote was actually given to me by an auditor. Most of them that I know are able to have a laugh at themselves.

Cheers,

Jim.
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Reply By: Lone Wolf - Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 22:01

Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 22:01
All of the above....

.... and, you've got to keep your body making heat, like what I mean, your body is like a little furnace.

On average, at rest, we produce around 100 watts oh heat per second. If we've just eaten, this can go as high as 400.

Eat well, just before bed, and you'll be toasty warm.

Wolfie
AnswerID: 121524

Reply By: Harry - Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 22:18

Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 22:18
Never heard so much claptrap about sleeping out before especially you Truckster.

Loughma,go to camping store, purchase hikers sleeping mat, made of very light close cell foam, you can sleep on the snow with 1 of these.About $12.
Superdown sleeping bag (good 1) on 60-70mm foam mattress on top of mat and don't load it over with extra blankets, you won't need them. Anything on top takes the loft out of the bag and you will get cold, it has to fluff up if you get my drift.
Sleep as light as possible, clothes will let your body heat out.
If you can't afford a down bag , then use a doona or similar that has a lot of loft.
Blankets are ok, but you will need really good ones, and at least 3-4, depending on how bluddy cold it's going to get.(Talk to the weather man).
I have never been cold with that setup and I'm talking minus temps.
It also helps heaps if you stand by the fire for a few minutes and slip into bed so that the heat radiates into your bag.
AnswerID: 121530

Follow Up By: Mad Dog (Australia) - Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 22:31

Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 22:31
12 dollar hikers mat eh
ROTFLMAO...how much do you weigh....30 kilo
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Follow Up By: derraux - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 00:01

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 00:01
Mad Dog Roflmao as much as you like that is exactly what those closed cell foam matts are sold for not designed for comfort but to stop the cold comming through go and ask anybody that has used one i am sure thay will tell you the same.
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Follow Up By: Mad Dog (Australia) - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 08:58

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 08:58
I don't doubt what you say but hikers carry those mats because they have to. Vehicle based campers have the luxury of being able to carry equipment that will keep them not only warm but also very comfortable
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Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 09:29

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 09:29
"Sleep as light as possible, clothes will let your body heat out."

LMAO yea thats why they walk naked to the Nth Pole. and when they do such treks, you always see them sleeping in their undies and thats it.

Thats why when they find people with Hyperthermia they rip all their clothes off and throw em in a fridge. It warms them.

LMAO

slow day at work yet again :(
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Follow Up By: rob&kev&roo - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 10:07

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 10:07
actually the newest treatment for hopothermia does involve cooling followed by controlled reheating.and one of the best in field treatments involves the removal of clothes.
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Follow Up By: rob&kev&roo - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 10:08

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 10:08
actually the newest treatment for hypothermia does involve cooling followed by controlled reheating.and one of the best in field treatments involves the removal of clothes.
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Follow Up By: chump_boy - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 13:29

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 13:29
I'm with Harry on this one. The good quality down sleeping bags are designed for you to sleep in as little as possible. Hikers regularly just chuck on a pair of shorts, and climb in with a couple of water bottles (so they don't freeze), some clothes for the next day, and have a good nights sleep.

The key is the sleeping bag. Get a cheap one, and it is to be used like an extra jacket or something (ie. sleep in clothes, jackets, and sleeping bag). Get a good one, and the design is totally different.

I have both types, and I take what is most appropriate for the conditions. My West German bag is a big, warm jacket with a removable bottom and is totally waterproof. Great for sitting round a campfire, getting mellow, and just going to sleep. My down bag is a quarter of the weight and size, and fits in a backpack easily. Great for hiking, and when it gets really cold.
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Reply By: Member - Ian W (NSW) - Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 22:26

Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 22:26
All you hear about airbeds being damned cold is true, however following spinal surgery they are the only thing on which I can get a goods nights sleep.

The secret is adequate insulation, I have two large pieces of that thick felt stuff used by furniture removalists, I think it's actually carpet underlay, one of those folded in half to give two layers on top of the airbed gives a very warm comfortable mattress and on below zero occasions I've used the second piece over the top of a sleeping bag. The stuff is surprisingly warm, they double for packing around gear in the back of the truck and one piece is always spread over the top of the load to hide my gear from prying eyes.

A good quality thermal beanie also makes a hell of a difference.
Invest in a set of thermal underwear for sleeping - not the cheap longjohns from Lowes or KMart but the good stuff from Mountain Designs, Katmandu, Paddy Pallin etc.

As previously mentioned hot water bottles are good, I find the boiling the water and filling bit a pain in the butt, but hey! When it gets cold enough nothing is too much trouble.

Basically it comes down to practice and what works best for you (different strokes for different folks), look around and see what others are doing and importantly how they front up the first thing the next morning, the guy who comes out of his tent stiff and aching taking twenty minutes to loosen up is not the one you wish to emulate.

Don't be turned off by the thought of cold winter camping, my wife and I camp all year round but love our winter trips. Less traffic, cheaper prices, quieter camps,
no flys, bush flys or mossies.

Thers a lot to be said in favour of winter camping - go for it!

Regards
Ian
AnswerID: 121532

Reply By: grutnip - Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 23:13

Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 23:13
The empirical data..

We have been sleeping on a 4" air mattress and it was colder than my 1" foam swag mattress.

Steer clear of thermals if you have a "realdoll" and want to cuddle up, thermals wick moisture to the outside and it feels like you are cuddling a cold damp sponge. Best clothes to wear are none at all, well, thats if realdoll is coming otherwise clothes are more insulation.

If you have to go with an air mattress, use an insulating layer. A reflective tarp also works too, reflective side up as heat gets reflected, not cold.

Some tech...

Heat is a measure of how quickly a molecule is vibrating, the more it vibrates, the hotter it is. This is why there is an "absolute zero" which is the temperature at which a molecule stops vibrating (-273°C). Heat transfer is the movement of energy from hot to cold, and the ways that this movement of energy can happen are radiation, conduction and convection. Radiation is what the sun does to the earth and is proportional to the 4th power of the temperature difference, so it doesn't do much unless there is a large temperature dfference (eg sun or fire making your skin feel warm). Radiation is a wave (like light) that excites a molecule and makes it vibrate more. Conduction is energy transfer through a solid, and convection is through a fluid. Conduction and convection are the same in that they transfer heat by a quickly vibrating molecule (hot) knocking about its neighbours which are vibrating less (cold) and so on. Conduction is where the molecules are held in a lattice (solid) and convection is where the molecules are free to move around (water or air).

Air itself is a reasonable insulator, but in an air mattress you get convective currents (like water boiling in a pot) that greatly increase the heat transfer. One way to not get convective currents is to rack the air off all-together and get some foam.

The reflective tarp works by reflecting radiation, but will only be usefull if there is a good temperature difference. Silver, white and mirros are the best reflectors of radiation and black and grey, especially matt black are the best absorbers of radiation.

dj
AnswerID: 121535

Follow Up By: derraux - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 00:08

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 00:08
Bloody hell that was way to complictaed for people that go camping (well for me anyway) the only good think i can see is that the realdoll will have to help with the vibration thing thanks heaps
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Reply By: Member - Norm C (QLD) - Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 23:15

Thursday, Jul 21, 2005 at 23:15
Simple.
1. Have plenty between you and the ground.
2. Air is a great insulator in conjunction with other materials, so down doonars are great (lots of air between the feathers). If you don't have one, layers of bed covers are better than 1 or 2 heavy blankets. The air between the layers acts as an insulator.
3. Wear wool close to the skin. It is a great insulator
4. Move to QLD or NT, or at least do your camping there in the winter!!!
AnswerID: 121536

Reply By: govo - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 00:28

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 00:28
If you going to a very cold region then the best way to stay warm at night is to make bush electric blanket.

Dig a hole 3 feet long... 10 inches deep....12 inches wide and place about 4 inches of hot coals in it and cover it over...lay down 1/2 hr later...ahhhhh ....warm as toast.

We used this method for years camping out west in winter and it worked a treat.

have fun
AnswerID: 121539

Reply By: Member - ROTORD - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 04:02

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 04:02
Hello All

The pioneering bullock drivers would wait till after sunset , boot a sleeping bullock in the ribs until it moved , and layout a swag on the warm patch . This technique should work with large scrub bulls and camels . It may also entail a brisk run , which would also be warming .
AnswerID: 121546

Follow Up By: cokeaddict - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 14:39

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 14:39
Thats really funny....might be fact (dont know) but very funny. I can see my wife poking a wild beast to get it to bugger off so she can lay her gear down to sleep.

Hmmmm....on second thought...not a bad idea....Up her insurance and lets try it. Might get my chev V8 convserion after all ay.

Ange
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Follow Up By: Gerhardp1 - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 18:35

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 18:35
That's what she does to you when she wants to sleep? Poke the wild beast and get it to bugger off.

Sorry, couldn't help myself......
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Reply By: Mike Harding - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 07:19

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 07:19
Lot's of good advice above (some rubbish too - electric blankets in the bush! you big girls blouse :) but ensure you wear a beanie hat, ideally made from wool. High heat loss from the head and especially when it's the only bit of you sticking out :)

Mike Harding
AnswerID: 121548

Follow Up By: govo - Saturday, Jul 23, 2005 at 17:43

Saturday, Jul 23, 2005 at 17:43
Mike if you had taken the time to read the my post correctly you would have noticed that l said ..bush electric blanket...( hot coals in the ground under you has the same effect as a electric blanket ).Don't knock it till you have tried it............you little boys jocks
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Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Saturday, Jul 23, 2005 at 20:13

Saturday, Jul 23, 2005 at 20:13
Govo if you had taken the time to read the thread correctly you would have noticed that a number of other people mentioned 12V electric blankets.

Mike Harding
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Reply By: theshadows - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 07:32

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 07:32
The natives have used this tried and tested solution for many generations.

2 cases of VB

your missus and her sister.

one old hz holden and 2 dogs

on really cold night make it 3 dogs and anther 6 pack.

shadow
AnswerID: 121551

Reply By: Well 55 - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 07:45

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 07:45
Just a good swag, doona, self inftating mattres, if still cold let all the dogs in.
AnswerID: 121556

Follow Up By: Member - Paul J (ACT) - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 09:05

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 09:05
Mornin Tony, hows the new camper going?
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Follow Up By: Well 55 - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 10:01

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 10:01
G'day Paul, the new camper is great, had a week away, went up to Glen Davis for a couple of days then on to Mudgee.

It towed really good no bounce with the dual wheels, got it covered in mud between Glen Davis and Dunns Swamp T/O. It tracked really well in the mud with only one wheel track left behind.

Now looking forward to the extended trip.

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Follow Up By: Member - Paul J (ACT) - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 10:03

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 10:03
Where ya goin for the extended trip?
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Follow Up By: Well 55 - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 10:10

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 10:10
No firm plans yet Paul but the Grandkids have moved from Weipa to Perth, so thats a good place to start.
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Follow Up By: Member - Paul J (ACT) - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 10:28

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 10:28
Hopefully doing the Perth trip next year some time, my Sister Outlaw lives over there..
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Follow Up By: Well 55 - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 10:33

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 10:33
The wife wants to go away the next school hols for a week, thats after she comes back from two weeks in NZ.
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Reply By: JamieMac - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 08:57

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 08:57
Self inflating Matress is your best option for underneath (thermarest best know brand but expensive) They insulate much better than a normal air matress which is an open chamber in contact with the ground and moves the heat away from you more quickly. Putting a couple of blankets or your foam matress on top of and/or underneath the air matress may help.

Dont sleep in the clothes you wore all day or you will spend all your energy warming up the moisture they contain as well as your body. Put on dry fresh clothes if you must but with a good sleeping bag you are best of next to naked (especially if there is someone else with you) inside a cotton liner to keep your skin off the nylon as it feels cold. The down, or whatever the sleeping bag filling is, will be crushed under your body and not of much use so move most of it to the top once you have the matress sorted.

Keep your head warm with a hood or beanie and try to rebreath some warm air from your exhaling to get warm initially. Pull te beanie right over your face and cup your hands for this.

I like to put clothes for the morning under me so they are warm to put on when I get up. They look wrinkled and crushed but it works and I am not a fashion victim!

This routine has worked for me from the Western Arthur Ranges in SW Tassie to the Tanamai in winter and everywhere in between. Good luck as there is not much worse than being cold in bed other than being wet also!

JamieMac
AnswerID: 121563

Follow Up By: locallaw - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 19:12

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 19:12
Gidday,Not so long ago I stayed in the ICE HOTEL in Finland(I think) and all we wore to bed was your undies inside a cotton bag.Minus 8 degrees ,every thing was made of ice,beds bar tumblers for drinking Scotch or rum(no need to put ice in).The sleeping bag was the best you could buy.Underneath was a couple of reindeer hides and a piece of 2 inch foam.You got undressed in the s/bag and all your clothes were pushed to the bottom of the bag then you climbed into the cotton bag.One thing is that you put your shoes on the hides.If you left them on the floor you needed a hammer and chisel to get them off.
The coldest weather was up past the Artic circle minus 29 deg.
We had a ball.
Seeya Locallaw
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Reply By: Willem - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 09:07

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 09:07
Any tent
Fold up camp bed(one that folds up in one or two movements)
-5 Sleeping bag(I have a -1...am a naturally warm person)
Warm clothes to sleep in
Beanie

If sleeping outside then put some newspaper on the bed.
Alternatively put nice row of glowing coals under bed
Pull poly tarp over you to stop the dew(ice) giving you a bath.

Sleep tight

AND don't forget to wear warm socks!!!
AnswerID: 121567

Reply By: Boc1971 - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 09:32

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 09:32
Lots of good answers - Just one thing ... Get a GOOD sleeping bag - forget the rating system for them , but mine is snow rated. ( baught it 10 years ago and still going strong )

LESS CLOTHES WHEN you GO TO SLEEP!! sounds stupid , but it does work -- i used to go to sleep all rugged up - into the sleeping bag - and would freeze - till someone suggested just undies and a shirt ( or thin jumper ) and magic - was toasty warm in about 5 min -- WHY ? wearing lots of clothes to bed Insulates you from the sleeping bag . thus not allowing the sleeping bag to warm you up ! Try it - you will be suprised -- i often find myself waking up when its about -3 -4 outside the tent and feeling like i am roasting hot

a good beanie is also a Must as 70% + body head can be lost there also, Never needed to use an electric blanket or water bottle-

I only go camping in winter time in the Lithgow and Oberon areas -

Hope this has helped

Frank
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Reply By: KOR - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 10:22

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 10:22
always be very wary of sleeping bags that are rated for -5 conditions because that is their maximum value. To sleep in -5 conditions you would probably consider a sleeping bag that is rated -20 or something like that.

Do not use an airbed as they bring up cold from the ground. Use a foam mattress. Also don't touch the inside of the tent because it will make the condensation leak inside the tent.

As for clothing, layer layer layer is all I can suggest. Tracksuits with undergarmets and socks!

Enjoy
AnswerID: 121575

Follow Up By: Mad Dog (Australia) - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 11:01

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 11:01
I love my airbed...only thing I can get a decent sleep on. I use a rubber backed matt underneath which insulates it from the cold ground...sleep like a baby
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FollowupID: 376731

Reply By: kat - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 16:17

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 16:17
Personal opinion only here but I found that when camping I tend to follow the "rules" given to me by my old unit CSM... a good warm sleeping bag,sleep in light clothes(t-shirt,trackies) put a pair of thick sox on and of course wear a nice thick woolly beanie.The main idea is your body conducts heat on its own and tends to loose it thru your head and feet first.That way when you get up in the morning you can put on "thicker layers of clothes" and be warm all thru the day.
Also I agree with everyone else...a good tawny port warms you up wonderfully!
As for the air matterise etc cant say I ever slept on one whilst camping..I mean we all slept in Hoochies and used a cam groundsheet all year round!! gotta love the Aussie army eh!!LOL
Maybe try sleeping outside at home and see how cold you feel before the trip.
And remember one extra blanket never goes astray!!
CHEERS
katrina
AnswerID: 121615

Follow Up By: grutnip - Tuesday, Jul 26, 2005 at 20:44

Tuesday, Jul 26, 2005 at 20:44
Whats a CSM? Damn army and their TLA's.

dj
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FollowupID: 377353

Follow Up By: kat - Wednesday, Jul 27, 2005 at 00:53

Wednesday, Jul 27, 2005 at 00:53
LOL!!
CSM stands for Company Sergent Major.
My apologies..it has been such a long time since I did all of that!!(10+ years)
It took me a while to learn some of the lingo on the forums too!!!
CHEERS
katrina
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FollowupID: 377397

Reply By: Alloy c/t - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 16:19

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 16:19
Never ever go to sleep camping wearing layer upon layer of your clothes ,, when you wake up at 3am to pass the port that kept you warm in bed ,you will bloody freeze as you have no more to put on ,,
AnswerID: 121617

Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 17:32

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 17:32
You've got all the good answers already.

But when the wife comes,
We find a double swag (3 hoop type) is warmer than a tent, and it only gets out of the vehicle at bedtime.
We use a 4inch foam mattress - great insulation, and comfortable as. Its very bulky, but we have the space.
Use single sleeping bags - warmer than double.
Same as the others - beanie, trackies etc
And put your bed clothes on after dinner.

When the wife doesn't come, use the other stuff in the bottle

Cheers
phil
AnswerID: 121630

Reply By: D-Jack - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 19:46

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 19:46
1) warm the sleeping bag around the fire before going to bed. Even if you don't get into it straight away, it takes the chill off.
2) Hot coals in the camp oven carefully positioned in the tent on a stand to stop heat getting through to the floor (or run the gas stove for a couple of minutes)
3)Agree with no clothes - I sleep starkers and warm up much quicker. Beanie is good though to keep the heat from the head in.
4)Good sleeping bag, don't need to spend too much. One that is down will last much longer and is much lighter and smaller, but is probably 4x the price. I like room to move too. Any of the Roman/carribee etc should be good if they have a -10 or more rating. Kmart - $130 carribee for $60 at the moment - clearance in Adelaide. They are big and roomy, but shouldn't worry you if you are not hiking.
5)when I scuba dive, they say movement creates the loss of body heat. Stay as still in your sleeping bag until it warms up.
6) done the buried coals under the swag before, good for underneath but the best bet is a self inflating mattress. Never been cold on mine, with a decent sleeping bag ontop.
7) warm up before going to bed - excercise/hot shower (if there is one)
8) joining sleeping bags together may be cosy, but it allows cold in because it is not perfectly sealed around you (gap between each of your shoulders etc)
9) hot water bottles.
10) if you know anyone who is a doctor or nurse, I have a friend who rigs up a catheter so he doesn't need to get up during the night (he gets severe back pain though which is worse in the cold and at night after lying still)
11) if you don't take advice from any of these, a plethera of port will usually suffice, but make sure it is enough that you don't wake up until morning.

D-Jack
AnswerID: 121649

Follow Up By: JamieMac - Tuesday, Jul 26, 2005 at 09:18

Tuesday, Jul 26, 2005 at 09:18
I'm not putting anything nylon and essential to my survival (well maybe just comfort) anywhere near a fire!

I have seen too many pairs of sock shoes and beanies that have sufferd from a momentary lapse whilst doing this to take the risk with an expensive bit of kit.
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FollowupID: 377221

Follow Up By: D-Jack - Tuesday, Jul 26, 2005 at 10:21

Tuesday, Jul 26, 2005 at 10:21
I wasn't actually talking about hanging it in the flames with a stick. Hold it as close as you would stand, may be 3 or 4 metres away with a really warm fire. No way it will combust unless you're a moron!

p.s. seen the soles of desert boots get so warm when someone was trying to warm his feet that he got up, stepped on a stones which were engulfed into the sole!
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FollowupID: 377226

Follow Up By: JamieMac - Tuesday, Jul 26, 2005 at 10:43

Tuesday, Jul 26, 2005 at 10:43
If your careful then you will get away with quite for some time. I just reckon that with with kids and other people and food and chatter and all the other stuff happening around a fire when I go camping that it will end in disaster of some sort.

Its hard to guess how much heat has gone into the sleeping bag or whatever until its too late. The afore mentioned beanie was mine for example. And If we end up one sleeping bag down I know I will end cold in a family with three females!

If it is several meters away I would argue that it will get more moisture from the descending mist as night falls and the advantage would be negated. Having said that I have never done it so I wont say dosnt work just that it is at some risk.

cheers
JamieMac
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FollowupID: 377229

Reply By: Wisey (NSW) - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 21:28

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 21:28
Many good suggestions, aside from port there is Antifreeze
or labled and sold as Stoneys Green Ginger Wine

Cheers
AnswerID: 121680

Follow Up By: gramps - Saturday, Jul 23, 2005 at 01:15

Saturday, Jul 23, 2005 at 01:15
ROFLMAO (with tears!!!)
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FollowupID: 376872

Reply By: Pedirka - Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 23:22

Friday, Jul 22, 2005 at 23:22
G'Day Loughma
My Wife and I use our double swag in the tent and bring our doona from home. On mild nights the canvas is off of us. On cold nights we pull the canvas up. I've never been cold in bed. The swag is also handy as when we move on we just roll it up and throw it on the roof rack. Easy!
Also if we deciede that we dont want to put the tent up, we just roll out the swag. Easy!

Cheers
AnswerID: 121691

Reply By: Bob of KAOS - Saturday, Jul 23, 2005 at 08:45

Saturday, Jul 23, 2005 at 08:45
Just a point on the alcohol - if you drink enough you won't feel cold (for a while). Alcohol is a peripheral vasodilator - it opens up the blood vessels supplying the skin. So you may feel warm but you are actually lowering your core temperature.
Lying still, you are burning energy at around 60 Watts. If you want to burn a bit more and raise your core temp do some isometric exercises (tighten muscles without altering their length). Isometric because if you thrash around you disrupt the insulating layer of warmth around you.
In my personal experience airbeds are a disaster. They operate like the cooling fins on a CPU.
A down sleeping bag and a foam matteress are the go (the one in the swag is fine). I recently woke up with frost on the swag but felt warm.
AnswerID: 121713

Follow Up By: grutnip - Tuesday, Jul 26, 2005 at 20:49

Tuesday, Jul 26, 2005 at 20:49
Ahh vasodilator, that is why I could go out all night in a tshirt and jeans in the melbourne winter after a few.

dj
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FollowupID: 377354

Reply By: Member - Frank - Tuesday, Jul 26, 2005 at 21:57

Tuesday, Jul 26, 2005 at 21:57
I have never heard so many ways to keep warm if you are confused

remember the old rule if have 4 blankets put two under its that simple

what I was taught buy my father an experinced bushman its called a ground sheet good "thick" waterproof canvas lay on ground put what you normaly use on one side then fold the other half over the top, even if the tent blows down it wont matter, has worked for me for 50 years of camping

Frank
AnswerID: 122204

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