air alot of hot

Submitted: Saturday, Dec 14, 2002 at 01:00
ThreadID: 2598 Views:1218 Replies:6 FollowUps:5
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Seems to be an awfull lot of questions on air compressors,so just to put in 2cents worth,upto and including 1965 B.M.W supplied a hand pump in the tool kit of their motorcycles, the point being that even a hand pump will reseat a bead on a tyre as long as a tube is in use,you have the time,the need,and the energy,.
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Reply By: OziExplorer - Saturday, Dec 14, 2002 at 01:00

Saturday, Dec 14, 2002 at 01:00
A liberal dose of good soapy water helps dramatically.

These Grunter compressors for $68.50 delivered Australia wide are the identical unit to some selling at over $250.
http://www.marlows.com.au/6791582.html
AnswerID: 9685

Follow Up By: Paul - Sunday, Dec 15, 2002 at 01:00

Sunday, Dec 15, 2002 at 01:00
So you recommend them? Do you have one?

I saw these and thought there might be a catch with them being so cheap.

Paul
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FollowupID: 5033

Follow Up By: Oziexplorer - Sunday, Dec 15, 2002 at 01:00

Sunday, Dec 15, 2002 at 01:00
Paul, yes I now have two. I was so impressed with the first one, I bought another one for the new work 4WD to give it a try. They often have to let their tyres down every day, and so far it has performed well for a month. We were using a US made Millar brand on 240vAC compressor on 600watt invertor, but they are no longer making them. They were a classy unit, small, belt drive, with what was only marginally bigger than a sewing machine motor.
The identical power unit in a Bushranger is $249
http://www.bushranger.com.au/showcase.asp?page=item&id=55X02
and a very similiar unit with bag to the Bushranger, with identical power unit at Supercheap Auto is $149
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Reply By: OziExplorer - Saturday, Dec 14, 2002 at 01:00

Saturday, Dec 14, 2002 at 01:00
A liberal dose of good soapy water helps dramatically.

These Grunter compressors for $68.50 delivered Australia wide are the identical unit to some selling at over $250.
http://www.marlows.com.au/6791582.html
AnswerID: 9686

Reply By: Member - Cruiser1 - Saturday, Dec 14, 2002 at 01:00

Saturday, Dec 14, 2002 at 01:00
One of the first things I was taught when learning to fit tyres was NOT to use soapy water because it could create rust in the bead area of any steel rim and eventual leakage. Also, due to the internal pressure, it could affect the steel belts in the tyres.
AnswerID: 9689

Follow Up By: Oziexplorer - Sunday, Dec 15, 2002 at 01:00

Sunday, Dec 15, 2002 at 01:00
You had better tell the people that put on the information and demonstration night they had on changing tyres in the bush put on by a tyre company last month. They advised that soapy water was the best medium to ensure the tyre seated properly into position, and not to use any other method of lubrication. Obviously you are posting flawed advice, as this was done by one of the leading tyre companies.
What you are saying may have been true back in the dark ages, but sounds like garbage with the quality of tyres and steel rims today.
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FollowupID: 5030

Follow Up By: Member - Cruiser1 - Monday, Dec 16, 2002 at 01:00

Monday, Dec 16, 2002 at 01:00
Ozi,
Like a number of other people lately, I am a bit bemused by your argumentative behaviour on this and another forum.
Why is it that whenever someone posts information/advice you have to give them a hard time?
Have you ever considered the effect your bullish language has on others?
Do you really get satisfaction from arguing the toss about things you clearly know little about, regardless of the number of web sources you quote?
Is it so difficult to acknowledge that there may be other opinions worth valuing?
People get on this forum to communicate, to discuss, to debate, to seek or provide information. Your bigoted, ill-informed manner does the forum no favours whatsoever.
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Reply By: Ron - Sunday, Dec 15, 2002 at 01:00

Sunday, Dec 15, 2002 at 01:00
Absolutely correct Cruiser - I just shuddered when I saw the previous flawed advice - good to see yours!
AnswerID: 9690

Follow Up By: Georg - Sunday, Dec 15, 2002 at 01:00

Sunday, Dec 15, 2002 at 01:00
Was always told a slime soulution made out of sunlight soap [ bar only ] could be used if needed, apparently the only mainstream soap that is not detrimental to rubber,
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FollowupID: 5031

Reply By: Steve - Sunday, Dec 15, 2002 at 01:00

Sunday, Dec 15, 2002 at 01:00
OZI... is at it again folks !! The wombat's got loose...


Now if you want to fit/ reseat the bead of your favourite tyres to your lovely rims you use a special wax that can be bought in the trade... it sticks like the proverbial .. and stays there to help you the next time you want to knock the bead off the rim before you have to bust your ass in the bush without any more help than your own strength....

Now that old cobblers about soap and water.... well lots of shops use it ... guess how much they save on $$ over a year ? Water and rubber do not mix... hence racing on slicks in wet weather does not work.. using soap makes the water 'hold' for a while whilst the bead is being seated .. water trapped inside the bead (hey.. not a lot !) .. will be trapped and over time will rust the rim and will weld the tyre to the rim !! Now go and ask your gardener friends what they spray on the groung to 'hold' water ! ... guess what ? washing up liquid ! So maybe this will help you understand why soap and water are a lousy cheap substitute for the correct wax for the job... but hell it does work !!

Hey ... in the bush and when your back is to the wall,, soap and water do a great job ... for the short term .. but that's it !! After time, the damage starts and a lot later the results are painfully obvious after travelling bush roads and with minimal opportunity for corrective maintenance.....It isn't rocket science , but simple facts make a difficult job a lot easier !!
AnswerID: 9699

Reply By: Bob Y. - Sunday, Dec 15, 2002 at 01:00

Sunday, Dec 15, 2002 at 01:00
Georg, would agree with you that you can reseat beads with almost any sort of pump, just depends on how much time/patience one has.

As for the soapy water fix (another thread runoff the rails!) as a temporary fix it maybe okay, but in the long term, if you want the interior of your rims to deteriorate, then use all the soapy water you can find. Split rims are difficult to keep in safe condition, due to rust around the locking rim, without adding extra moisture.

As for the lubricant used in the trade, we've just used a similar product to fit together lengths of 600 mm dia poly pipe, it's not oily or greasy, but the lengths went together like a thumb in a bum.

The aforementioned, un-named tyre company agenda would be to sell mobs of tyres, rather than care for customers rims. Why, they might even be able to sell you a new set when your others aren't safe. Regards to all....
AnswerID: 9716

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