Evacool filter system

Submitted: Monday, Dec 16, 2002 at 01:00
ThreadID: 2620 Views:1265 Replies:2 FollowUps:7
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Been reading the forums on these fridges, and they seem to have problems attracting dust into the motors. Has anyone come up with any ideas for filtering as I've just bought one of these units and I'd hate to make the same mistakes.

Thanks Willo
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Reply By: Member - Moggs - Monday, Dec 16, 2002 at 01:00

Monday, Dec 16, 2002 at 01:00
willo - this has worked for us - everyone can make up their own mind - we had a reverse cycle airconditioner installed at home and had about 1/2 mtr of dust filter material left over from the air return grill. We wrapped this around the vents in the frdige and have not had a problem. It is easily cleaned by rinsing in water, does not restrict airflow and is cheap. Moggs
AnswerID: 9769

Follow Up By: Willo - Monday, Dec 16, 2002 at 01:00

Monday, Dec 16, 2002 at 01:00
Thanks Moggs, pretty handy for nicks. Simple too. I guess you just get it from heating/cooling places?
Willo
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Reply By: OziExplorer - Monday, Dec 16, 2002 at 01:00

Monday, Dec 16, 2002 at 01:00
I just blow the dust out every now and again. Very little dust gets into mine. Unless you had the fridge in the back of a vehicle out in the open with no protection I think it would be a problem. That case where they had a warranty rejected due to dust would be a very rare problem. The people obviously did not care about their equipment. If there was so much dust in the unit, can you imagine what the rest of the fridge looked like. Unfortunatly not all people care for their equipment. It is easy enough to see when the dust needs blowing out. I would not bother doing anything, unless you have a special case and major dust problem.
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Follow Up By: Georg - Monday, Dec 16, 2002 at 01:00

Monday, Dec 16, 2002 at 01:00
And you have gall to imply that truckster is on drugs ???
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Follow Up By: Willo - Monday, Dec 16, 2002 at 01:00

Monday, Dec 16, 2002 at 01:00
Fair point OziExplorer. I guess sometimes you only get one side of the coin. I'll definitely mount mine in the cab of the troopy, and monitor it as I go.Thanks.
Willo
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Follow Up By: Member - Moggs - Monday, Dec 16, 2002 at 01:00

Monday, Dec 16, 2002 at 01:00
Willo, we carry our fridge inside the car, however we sometimes place it on the ground outside when we are camping and we can't put the car in the shade as the car gets too hot- typically if theres no trees or shade you tend to get dust - this is where we were having problems with dust in the motor. I agree with OziExplorer that you can just blow it out when needed - however, I believe it is better to stop the dust getting in at all - why risk warranty type issues if there is an easy fix. Any shop that sells airconditioners, and many chain hardware stores sell aircon filter pads. Moggs
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Follow Up By: Oziexplorer - Monday, Dec 16, 2002 at 01:00

Monday, Dec 16, 2002 at 01:00
Air conditioners are designed to have filter pads, and consequenlty have a larger area to make up for the air flow that the filter pad stops.
A filter pad would stop a minimum of 30% of the air flow, and true figures are probably closer to 40%. I doubt the fridges are designed to have their air flow cut down by that amount, as being so compact, there would be no allowance made for a reduction in air flow a filter would have.
With your fridge travelling in the cab, it should not be an issue at all.
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Follow Up By: Member - Moggs - Monday, Dec 16, 2002 at 01:00

Monday, Dec 16, 2002 at 01:00
OziExplorer - you may be right about the restriction to airflow, however I doubt that it would be up near 30%. Anyway, never had a problem using the filter pads and have not noticed by way of power consumption, generated heat or otherwise any change to the running of the fridge since we started using them. Each to their own I suppose
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Follow Up By: Tony - Thursday, Dec 19, 2002 at 01:00

Thursday, Dec 19, 2002 at 01:00
I don't usually agree with OziExplorer, but in this case he's quite right about the reduction in air circulation being about 30%. If the airflow is reduced around your condenser the fridge unit will have a difficult job removing heat from the interior of the unit. Those units that don't have an inbuilt fan will suffer even more. You want to have as much ventilation around your fridge as possible. If the units are half decent an air gun will do the job after a long trip. My Reefer takes a hammering quite often in the Simpson and in a working situation where its used in a muster camp on the back of a ute its hard to recognise it after a couple of weeks. But when it gets back an air gun and a damp cloth usually does the trick.
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