Patrol GQ FWB

Submitted: Tuesday, Dec 31, 2002 at 01:00
ThreadID: 2747 Views:1673 Replies:12 FollowUps:5
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Hi Guys...

any ideas on a tool for adjusting the front wheel bearings on a GQ, the bearing nut is like a 10mm thick threaded washer with 6 holes round the outside, a tool would have to bridge the end of the halfshaft and engage with 2 holes in the nut. I could spend all day making a tool but does someone know if there's something commercially available?

BFN
Daffyd

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Reply By: OziExplorer - Tuesday, Dec 31, 2002 at 01:00

Tuesday, Dec 31, 2002 at 01:00
You may be better asking here:
http://forums.overlander.com.au
on the Technical Forum
AnswerID: 10347

Reply By: Truckster - Tuesday, Dec 31, 2002 at 01:00

Tuesday, Dec 31, 2002 at 01:00
Nissan have a tool available for 123.33

Try any repco store they should have something that will do, failing that, cold chisel and hammer :D

Must be a different nut to the 52.5mm one on my GQ...
AnswerID: 10351

Follow Up By: Daffyd - Tuesday, Dec 31, 2002 at 01:00

Tuesday, Dec 31, 2002 at 01:00
Hmmm... prolly my fault Truckster - in full Nissan speak it's a Patrol GR Y60 with a TD42 engine....yea a UK jobby.. I'm down here in deepest wettest Wales, had the Patrol 9 years now - I always thought it was the equivalent of the Auz GQ. I thought about a cold chiesel but it's hard to get it up to 200nm without cutting it in half!!





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FollowupID: 5436

Reply By: Member - Andrew - Wednesday, Jan 01, 2003 at 01:00

Wednesday, Jan 01, 2003 at 01:00
Just a thought Daffyd______ what about the tool from a 9 inch angle grinder (for doing up the blade nut) some of them might be the right size and suitable hardness.
AnswerID: 10378

Follow Up By: Daffyd - Wednesday, Jan 01, 2003 at 01:00

Wednesday, Jan 01, 2003 at 01:00
Thanks andrew,

thats a neat idea, I'll take the nut down to a local hire centre and see if anything will match up.

Cheers
Daffyd
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FollowupID: 5439

Reply By: Eric - Wednesday, Jan 01, 2003 at 01:00

Wednesday, Jan 01, 2003 at 01:00
Daffyd.
Why do you want to do the nut up to 200 nm ? that is way to much. I normaly do them up with a piar of long nose pliers just enough to remove the end float. Some books talk about big tensions to seat the bearings but that is not a good idea as it will damage the fine surface of a modern bearing. Eric.
AnswerID: 10417

Follow Up By: Daffyd - Thursday, Jan 02, 2003 at 01:00

Thursday, Jan 02, 2003 at 01:00
Hi Eric,

Does sound a bit scary but it's the method recommended in the Patrol service manual and by the bearing manufacturers. I've used this method on other vehicles with no problems - the only difference in this case is trying to find a tool that can do the job without forking out big money!!

I found an article on the bearing site saying this proceedure 'establishes the new upper tracking limit of the inner and outer race? I guess that means the roller will ride up to a new hieght on the inner after adjustment?

Rgds
Daffyd

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FollowupID: 5466

Reply By: John - Thursday, Jan 02, 2003 at 01:00

Thursday, Jan 02, 2003 at 01:00
Daffyd
I sympathise with you. A while back I decided to have a go at repacking my front wheel bearings on my Aussie 1996 GQ Patrol. My workshop manual said I needed a 53mm hub nut socket and a torque wrench good for 200nm. Bought both for almost $200 and was most annoyed when I pulled the hub apart to find the setup you mentioned which didn't require the hub nut socket or the Nissan locking washers they sold me without bothering to tell me my vehicle didn't use them. When I removed the locking screw, the washer you mention with the holes was not real tight anyway (Nissan had done all of my previous servicing). I repacked the bearings, did the aforementioned holey washer up as tight as I could with a screwdriver and light tap with a hammer, then backed off to firm without the hammer tap and bearings have been going just fine for last 30,000. Check them now and then and seems to have worked ok without the use of an expensive torque wrench and special tool.
AnswerID: 10433

Follow Up By: Daffyd - Thursday, Jan 02, 2003 at 01:00

Thursday, Jan 02, 2003 at 01:00
Thanks for the reponses guys - I'm going to do it today - the Oz way!!

BTW John, were you using the Haynes manual for the GQ, if so is it any good? I've been considering buying one it as the Nissan Service manual for the Patrol completely omits any reference to the TD42 motor!

Thanks again
Daffyd
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FollowupID: 5498

Reply By: tour boy - Thursday, Jan 02, 2003 at 01:00

Thursday, Jan 02, 2003 at 01:00
As John said, a screwdriver and hammer to tight then back off a little will do the trick.
AnswerID: 10451

Reply By: Truckster - Thursday, Jan 02, 2003 at 01:00

Thursday, Jan 02, 2003 at 01:00
I have the gregorys manual and the genuine nissan ones..

Save up for the nissan ones, they are awesome..... the gregorys one has some mistakes in capacities of things like diffs...
AnswerID: 10469

Reply By: Eric - Thursday, Jan 02, 2003 at 01:00

Thursday, Jan 02, 2003 at 01:00
Daffyd.
Sorry I forgot to say that rotating the hub while adjusting it will seat the bearing in its correct spot. as for the high torque that is ok if on a production line when the process is automated and it is not practical to rotate the hub. On the subject of hayes manuals the person who payed $200 for the tools he did not nead demonstrates that the factory manual always works out cheaper in the end. Eric.
AnswerID: 10471

Reply By: John - Friday, Jan 03, 2003 at 01:00

Friday, Jan 03, 2003 at 01:00
Daffyd
I have the Gregorys one with the 2.8 supplement. I too have found some differences to reality in it and use it purely as a guide not the bible. Wanted to get the Nissan books but you have to buy one for this and one for that and one for something else. Looked like you had to buy a few books to cover everything. Other reason I went with the gregorys is that I hope to upgrade to a 4.2 down the track so I can still use the same book. Sought of like buying a 2.8 in the first place....you have to compromise. Use it with an open mind.
AnswerID: 10485

Follow Up By: Daffyd - Friday, Jan 03, 2003 at 01:00

Friday, Jan 03, 2003 at 01:00
Gregorys don't seem to market in the UK, but it seems about the same with the Haynes manual.

Anyway the jobs done and without a mark on the threaded washer!

I used a 6mm dia mild steel rod pushed in to one hole in the threaded washer, this was held at right angles to the washer by nipper no.1 with a mole grip, nipper no.2 is turning the wheel, I'm tightening the nut with a screwdriver and a hammer but hammering on a small groove i cut in the 6mm rod just above the level of the washer.

Whacked it up as tight as i could then backed it off and then just nipped it up.

Afterwards (story of my life) I thought of a better way - get a 50mm long reach socket, about 70mm deep should do it - then grind down the front end leaving 2 x 6mm wide tabs standing about 4mm proud to engage the holes in the washer.

Thanks for the advice guy's - I'll be back!!


Daffyd





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FollowupID: 5519

Reply By: kezza - Friday, Jan 03, 2003 at 01:00

Friday, Jan 03, 2003 at 01:00
Correct proceedure is to ONLY tighten up hub bearing to 200nm to ensure correct seating of hubs, bearings and seals - turn the disk rotor several times both directions, back bearing right off then retension to about 2-3 nm, then place lock washer in and lock off main nut (it wont move). Then lock nut can be tightened to spec which is as close to 200nm as you wish to go. do your homework if doing front bearings and read manual CAREFULLY common (mechanical) sense will assist with interpreting some of these manuals
kezz
AnswerID: 10535

Reply By: John - Monday, Jan 06, 2003 at 01:00

Monday, Jan 06, 2003 at 01:00
Couple of questions now you've done it Daffyd.
How did you reseat the inner seal on your disc rotor. I tapped mine (ever so lightly) with a mallet and had some trouble getting it in. Also was a problem because the rubber lip sits higher than the metal surround, which means you actually are tapping the rubber bit which isn't real good.
Did you repack your free wheeling hubs? I couldn't separate the clutch assembly and handle from the housing. Settled on pulling the rollers out, cleaned the old grease out as best as possible and repacked it. Comparing to other GQs, there are a few different manual free wheeling hub setups as well. SHOULD HAVE BOUGHT A GENUINE MANUAL I SUPPOSE !!
AnswerID: 10660

Reply By: Daffyd - Monday, Jan 06, 2003 at 01:00

Monday, Jan 06, 2003 at 01:00
Hi John,

I can't help you there as I didn't take the rotor off, I just adjusted the bearing. I only regreased the locking hub brake.

I have the 2 way locking hubs, on the hub they're marked Auto-Lock-Auto-Lock. If I'm going somewhere very boggy I lock the front hubs manually as they can get 'out of sysnc' in Auto usually if your bogged down and trying the 'rock' yourself out using fwd/rev. If that happens one hub usually starts making a loud clicking noise.

I know some models have a simpler Free-Lock type hub. I don't have any problem with the Auto hub so long as your aware of the limitations and use the manual lock if the going gets heavy.

Cheers
Daffyd
AnswerID: 10678

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