KYOCERA SOLAR SYSTEM

Submitted: Wednesday, Jan 08, 2003 at 20:35
ThreadID: 2860 Views:2407 Replies:4 FollowUps:3
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AM THINKING OF A SOLAR SYSTEM OR A GEN SET. AFTER MUCH PONDERING AND SUBMITTING QUESTIONS IN THIS FORUM, NOW HAVE GONE TO SOLAR. WHAT DO WE THINK OF THIS SET UP AND PRICE. 2 X 60 WATT KYOCERA PANELS WITH REGULATOR( 10 AMP), 8 METRES OF CABLE, ALL NECESSARY PLUGS, ALL ON A FOLD UP FRAME WITH HANDLES. THIS COST NEW $1698. I AM RUNNING A 50L TRAILBLAZA AND LIGHTS. THE BATTERIES WOULD BE WHAT THEY RECCOMEND AND I THINK THE AGENT SAID 2 X 120A DEEP CYCLE. THESE WOULD PROBABLY COST ANOTHER $300 OR SO EACH. I REALISE THAT ALL THIS IS A BIT PRICEY BUT I WOULD RATHER PAY THE MONEY UP FRONT AND KNOW THAT I HAVE A GOOD SET UP THAT WON'T LET ME DOWN. I WILL BE CHARGING THE BATTERIES OFF THE CAR WHEN TRAVELLING. IS THIS OVERKILL ?
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Reply By: Topcat - Wednesday, Jan 08, 2003 at 21:28

Wednesday, Jan 08, 2003 at 21:28
Hi Robert, I run a 60litre Trailblaiza off 2x80watt BP panels connected to 2x6volt 250amp deep cycle batteries & find it is more then efficient for running my aux. power needs. If you shop around you can pick up the 6volt 215 amp Trojan deep cycle battery for under $200 including GST. So a couple of them connected in series will be a cheaper option on the battery side.
AnswerID: 10863

Reply By: OziExplorer - Wednesday, Jan 08, 2003 at 21:58

Wednesday, Jan 08, 2003 at 21:58
Robert, that is a lot of money for a system of that capacity without batteries.
2 x BP Solar SX60 60w panels should be sufficient and they can be purchased for $576 each from here:
http://www.coiltek.com.au/Products/solar_panels.htm
Information on BP Solar here:
http://www.bpsolar.com/ContentPage.cfm?page=20
No big deal to put a piece of piano hinge on the panels and a suitcase clip and a handle $25 and 30 minutes work with a pop riviter When you open the panels, to keep them straight, you get a piece of channel aluminium to put across the hinge about 300mm long. Fits inside when you fold them up. To hold the panel at the angle to the sun 2 pieces of aluminium strip 5mm thick by 25mm wide and 400mm long, 2 x 5mm x 20mm stainless steel bolts and two nylok nuts and 4 fibre washes. Cost $8.00. Just drill a hole in the frame each side (short side) and put the fibre washer each side of the aluminium leg and tighten the nylok washer to the correct tension - 10 mins work at most.
Best solar regulator I have found and one of the cheaper ones is Part Number MP3126 $69.90 What a bonus, made in Australia as well.
from:
www.jaycar.com.au
Batteries we are presently using and getting excellent life from are the Apollo deep cycle batteries. These are made in Korea by Global Yuasa and we have found they are superior to batteries two and three times the price.
http://www.apollobatteries.com.au/spec.htm
The ones we use are the last item on the page the 882 about $140. Now, depends on how long and what time of year etc. you are going to use these panels and fridge as to what battery capacity you need. I would suggest the one 882 is sufficient as it is what we use with our solar panels, and run the lights, radio, TV and computer gear from it. In winter you will have to move these panels three times during the day to get sufficient charge.
The cable you need to connect the panels to the batteries would be 6mm double sheathed cable, preferably oxygen free copper cable $2.50 meter. As for the plugs, well depends what you need. I like to use a small Anderson plug which is $14 and basically industructable.
So you can say for probably $1450 you can have the whole system up and running, battery included.

I have tried many of these flash expensive supposed super batteries, from the Optima to gel cells, and are not at all impressed for the money.
The other advantage using the Apollo battery, you can charge it from your car alternator via a Redarc Battery Isolator $110 incl GST (approx)
http://www.redarc.com.au/sbi.htm
without any issue. All the flash expensive solar type deep cycle batteries should only be charged at 10% of capacity which is very limiting.
AnswerID: 10865

Follow Up By: Oziexplorer - Wednesday, Jan 08, 2003 at 22:03

Wednesday, Jan 08, 2003 at 22:03
Robert I meant to add this:
The other advantage using the Apollo battery, you can charge it from your car alternator via a Redarc Battery Isolator $110 incl GST (approx) while travelling, and have no need to disconnect anything when you are stationary charging from your panels
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Follow Up By: Member - Nigel - Thursday, Jan 09, 2003 at 01:27

Thursday, Jan 09, 2003 at 01:27
Despite all the hype about AGM and Gelcells, a well constructed and maintained deep cycle flooded cell will provide more cycles that either of the sealed types. Unfortunately flooded cells are more affected by abuse (vibration, undercharging, lack of water).

But if you need a fully sealed battery for any reason, or one that can be recharged in a short time, then AGM may be more suitable. If your prepared to pay the price.
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FollowupID: 5857

Reply By: Member - ROBERT - Thursday, Jan 09, 2003 at 09:13

Thursday, Jan 09, 2003 at 09:13
Thanks for the replys and banter. I might look at doing it myself as Ozi explains in great detail (for which I am greatful) and save approx. $800 all up. Do these panels work at all in semi shade ( as under she oaks etc.)
AnswerID: 10892

Follow Up By: Oziexplorer - Thursday, Jan 09, 2003 at 10:06

Thursday, Jan 09, 2003 at 10:06
Robert NO panels work in semi-shade, despite the advertising of some.
Quote from the Tasman Energy webpage:
http://www.tasmanenergy.com.au/solar_panels.htm
QUOTE:
Shade Tolerance: Unfortunately no panel works well in partial shade or overcast conditions. If you panel salesman is telling you otherwise find a new one! Unisolar and Kyocera both make a "shade tolerant" panel however the output in shade is only marginally better than a non-shade tolerant panel and marginally better than very little still won't charge your batteries in shade or partial shade.
END QUOTE:
I would agree with the above statement, and have been involved with solar panels since they were commercially introduced to the market.

Amphourous panels which are substantially larger in size to Multicrystiline panels will give out slightly more power in partially shaded conditions, however, this is inevitable considering the much larger surface area they have. Everything is proportional.

Tasman Energy do have the Kyocera 120w panels on special at $990 and if you can handle the physical size of the panel 1425 x 652 x 30mm it would not be a bad buy. I don't like the small regulators Tasman Energy supply. That Jaycar supplied unit made by Maitland Enterprises in Australia is the best small solar regulator with all the desired features I have found to date.
http://www.tasmanenergy.com.au/specials.htm
BP Solar, Kyocera and Solarex Multicrystiline panels are similiar in performance and quality, and not a lot to choose between them.
Bias Boating sell Solarex and their prices are also pretty good and the best I know off for Solarex panels
http://www.biasboating.com.au/solarpanels.html

Don't hesitate to post back or e-mail me if you need any assistance.
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Reply By: Tuco69 - Thursday, Jan 09, 2003 at 09:53

Thursday, Jan 09, 2003 at 09:53
Robert, have a look at:
http://www.tasmanenergy.com.au/solar_panels.htm

They also have Kyocera panels at very competitive prices - I bought one of their 120 Watt versions on special at $990 plus $20 delivery. Arrived in 3 days.

Tuco
AnswerID: 10896

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