plastic fuel containers how safe ?

Submitted: Friday, Jan 10, 2003 at 13:30
ThreadID: 2893 Views:6013 Replies:7 FollowUps:6
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Can any one tell me how safe the red plastic fuel containers are against metal jerry cans , also they dont seem to have any presure release valves is this a problem ? I plan to carry petrol in them on my roof rack untill they can be added to the fuel tank ,we will be travelling the WA outback so temps can be high ,thanks for any help
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Reply By: ThePublican - Friday, Jan 10, 2003 at 13:56

Friday, Jan 10, 2003 at 13:56
Type in fuel containers into the search function,no need for dates,will give more than enough information to boggle the mind.
AnswerID: 10996

Reply By: Truckster - Friday, Jan 10, 2003 at 15:51

Friday, Jan 10, 2003 at 15:51
just a question, whats wrong with metal Jerrys?

Plastic boucing and splitting is one thing I can see happening... then it can happen with metal but chances are less I would guess.
AnswerID: 11006

Follow Up By: Member - Bob - Friday, Jan 10, 2003 at 16:19

Friday, Jan 10, 2003 at 16:19
All been said before - both are safe.
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Follow Up By: Flappan - Friday, Jan 10, 2003 at 16:19

Friday, Jan 10, 2003 at 16:19
Probably the intial weight Truckster.

Metal Jerry's are substanially heavier then the plastic ones, and with the current trend (rightly or wrongly) to throw them up high, people seem to have preference for the lighter plastic ones.

I've used plastic fuel cans for ages and haven't had a problem . . . yet.

Although I would say, for long distance touring, metal ones would be my prefered option.
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Follow Up By: Old Soldier - Friday, Jan 10, 2003 at 17:01

Friday, Jan 10, 2003 at 17:01
G'day all,

I've used both metal and plastic over the years.

I can't comment on the red ones, but lately I have gone towards the Rheem black plastic ones and have found they stand up to all I can throw at them.

I have used them for some extensive long distance travel [on the trailer] up round the gulf on some fairly "ordinary" tracks and have had no probs.

Yeah, you have to bleed the air from them every now and then, but "on road" checks & maintainence should be part of your driving day every time you stop.

I guess the "old school" part of me will always prefer the military D^D jerry [built like a brick dunny], but the genuine ones are as scarce as hen's teeth these days, and the shiny, tinny replicas found in the auto "cheapie" shops are no comparison.

I think will stick with the Rheem - at least I know they are made in Oz to our ASA standards.

enjoy the bush

DennisN
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Reply By: royce - Saturday, Jan 11, 2003 at 09:44

Saturday, Jan 11, 2003 at 09:44
I'm worried about carrying fuel on the roof. I usually leave light but bulky stuff for up there... Lifting up and down, leaks, damage if hit, theft are all considerations. I don't use the plastic ones much..... probably because I have plent of metal gerry cans... I have one red, fuel container down beside the pump. It doesn't seal well and doesn't pour well. My only experience. I suspect that rubbing problems might be better with the thicker plastic. end of thoughts cheers Royce
AnswerID: 11054

Reply By: chopper - Saturday, Jan 11, 2003 at 18:27

Saturday, Jan 11, 2003 at 18:27
The black rheem ones have taken every bit of punishment that I can dole out to them, and would be better than the, admittedly cheapie, steel ones that I bought when first getting into 4wheeling.

If there were any other option I would certainly avoid putting them on the roof but I understand thatthe kids would probably like the roof even less than the fuel. (nor would they like to be sharing a back seat with a can of petrol).

If you can get hold of plastic Nally bins (get the real ones rather than the -nylex i think- imitations) you'll find that three jerries fit into one of these PERFECTLY. They don't bounce around and because they are broadside to each other there is a greater surface area than against a rack and therefore less chance of rubbing through.

hope that this is useful.
AnswerID: 11070

Follow Up By: Chris - Sunday, Jan 12, 2003 at 23:26

Sunday, Jan 12, 2003 at 23:26
chopper

I have not heard of or seen the nelly bins. What are they and where can I get them?

Thanks,

Chris
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Follow Up By: Chopper - Monday, Jan 13, 2003 at 07:26

Monday, Jan 13, 2003 at 07:26
Your local butcher could probably help as could just about any camping shop.
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Reply By: Member - Alan - Sunday, Jan 12, 2003 at 10:49

Sunday, Jan 12, 2003 at 10:49
Yes plastic Rheem are good; sit them on my roof rack flat and cover with a couple of `aluminium` reflective windscreen sheets to reflect heat, use elastics to hold down. Works well. Cheers
AnswerID: 11103

Follow Up By: Member - Peter- Sunday, Jan 12, 2003 at 16:10

Sunday, Jan 12, 2003 at 16:10
Thanks to all for your input regards peter
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Reply By: Ernie - Sunday, Feb 16, 2003 at 09:49

Sunday, Feb 16, 2003 at 09:49
I think it's only a matter of time before carrying fuel cans external to the vehicle will be prohibited. Modern automobiles are fitted with plastic fuel tanks.
AnswerID: 13232

Reply By: Slunnie - Sunday, Feb 16, 2003 at 23:11

Sunday, Feb 16, 2003 at 23:11
I have also found the black rheem ones to be excellent. The problem I always had with the red ones is getting a good seal on the lids and the fumes they let through.

Regards
Slunnie
AnswerID: 13287

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