Solar setup on camper

Submitted: Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 07:43
ThreadID: 29556 Views:7907 Replies:11 FollowUps:27
This Thread has been Archived
Hi Folks

I have learnt so much about solar and battery setups thanks to all the info on this site, that i am now ready to implement my own solution.

I am about to receive my new Engel 40l fridge (upgrade from a 10yo chescold 3-way) so I need a 12v solution for an upcoming week on Fraser Is in Feb.

I have a camper trailer with 80ah LifelLine AGM deep cycle in the front toolbox which currently runs 2x fluro lights (1ah each for 3hrs per night), water pump (7ah 10mins per day) and shower pump (2ah estimated, 15mins per day). My 100 series has a dual battery setup and the 2nd batt is a 55ah deep cycle.

My plan is to purchase;
*1x UniSolar 64watt Panel
*1x Steca PR1515 Solar regulator with 15m lead and a Anderson plug on the end.
*Install a 10mm Anderson plug on the 100 series cruiser from the 2nd 55ah batt to the rear bumper (with a big 50amp fuse).
*Install an Anderson plug on the camper trailer back to the regulator/80ah Lifeline batt.

So, if my 80ah batt runs out of grunt and the solar panel can't keep up due to weather conditions etc I can plug the trailer into the Anderson plug on the vehicle and draw from the 55ah batt under the bonnet. Plus I can start the car and run it to charge both batteries at the same time via the anderson plug.

How does that sound - any and all feedback welcome?

My only question at this stage is - because the Steca regulator is a smart device which can monitor the battery output and input and provide history over the past 30 days, I am concernced that unplugging the solar panel and plugging the trailer back into the Anderson plug on the car to draw from the 55ah will mess up the 'figures' displayed on the Steca's LCD becasue the input has changed?
I hope that makes sense.

Stu
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: revhead307 - Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 09:24

Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 09:24
just an aside...

What amperage is the regulator (ie 10A, 20A etc)

A 64W panel will only send u between 5 and 6Amps (max) throught the regulator.

however, if your 80Ah battery is down, and you connect it to ur auxillary and its still running through the regulator it has the potential to draw far more amps than the regulator is designed for.

As just like when jump starting, the run down battery will try and draw whatever amps it needs to replenish itself.

Rev

AnswerID: 147742

Follow Up By: Stu A - Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 09:43

Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 09:43
Thanks Rev
The regultor I was planning to use is 15amp, but you make a good point.

If the 80ah batt is low and I plug in the 55ah Aux batt, what will happen?
Will it just quickly "charge" the 80ah battery at 15amps max because of the reg limit?

Cheers
Stu
0
FollowupID: 401044

Follow Up By: Mainey (WA) - Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 13:06

Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 13:06
Stu, woops major accident about to happen :-(

The Steca solar reg has to be connected inline between the Solar Panel and the FIRST battery in the battery system.

It's not relevant in any way to the battery calculations mentioned above.

The fridge is also connected to the Steca, ONLY if, you want the battery disconnect to work via the regulator, as I don't believe the "SoC" system will work for your setup at all, so run it only on "Voltage" system.

Any other batteries would then be connected 'in parallel' to the first Aux battery via the anderson plug and would be also charged by the Solar panel, via the solar regulator, as the reg has a max of 15a, and with a 64wt panel there is no drama's at all.

My own thought is that a 64watt panel is way too small, and may not deliver 5 a/h to the battery/ies even in the best conditions.

The entire battery set-up would also be charged by the vehicle alternator.
0
FollowupID: 401077

Follow Up By: Stu A - Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 13:17

Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 13:17
Thanks Mainey, but I am a little green on this stuff and I am missing your point.

My plan was to connect things like this...
*Solar Panel into reg (input to 80ah batt via Anderson plug).
*Reg into 80ah battery in trailer (input to batt)
*Aux battery into reg (input to 80ah batt via Anderson plug)
*Fridge & Accessories into Reg (output)

Does this make sense?
Am I missing something?

Thanks for your opinion on the 64watt panel, I am re-considering.

Stu
0
FollowupID: 401081

Follow Up By: Mainey (WA) - Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 13:39

Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 13:39
Stu,
Simplified & re-stated; (I hope)

Cables (+&-) from Solar panel to -> Steca Reg

Cables (+&-) from Steca Reg to -> First Aux battery (use a fuse system)

Cables (+&-) from Steca reg to -> Fridge (use a fuse system)

Cables from First Aux battery, via anderson plug to -> Second Aux battery

Use 'thick' cable and decent attachment method ?

I've used 80wt panel for 9 years, sometimes wish I had 120wt :-)
0
FollowupID: 401088

Follow Up By: Stu A - Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 16:56

Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 16:56
Mainey
OK - I've read the manual on the Steca Reg and drawn a wiring diagram on the computer to help get my head around it.

But I can't attach the diagram to these posts so you can look at it.
Anyway I can send you a PDF file for you to look at?

Stu

0
FollowupID: 401128

Follow Up By: Mainey (WA) - Saturday, Jan 14, 2006 at 14:34

Saturday, Jan 14, 2006 at 14:34
*Solar Panel into reg = Cables from Solar panel to -> Steca Reg
*Aux battery into reg = Cables from Steca Reg to -> into FIRST Aux battery in vehicle (use a fuse system)
*Reg into battery in trailer = .........NO......
connect SECOND battery in trailer direct to FIRST battery in vehicle via Anderson plug
*Fridge & Accessories into Reg (output) = Cables from Steca reg to -> Fridge (use a fuse system)
However you could run a 'fuse block' cable direct to the Steca reg output instead, and run your fridge and lights etc all of the fuse block.

I have connected lights and power points seperately as they run off an inderpendant fuse box drawing power direct from the Aux battery.
I only run the fridge off the Steca regulator. The Steca only monitors power going into the battery from the solar panel and not from the alternator as well, so the S0C numbers are not relevant unless camped.

0
FollowupID: 401772

Reply By: revhead307 - Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 10:15

Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 10:15
Gday Stu

Your best bet would be to ask the people you intend to purchase the equipment off as to the consequences, as they should have a better understanding of it.

Cheers

Rev

AnswerID: 147754

Follow Up By: Mainey (WA) - Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 13:44

Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 13:44
Rev, an even better idea is to ask someone who actually uses one...

as many "sales people" have only ever seen them in a box and not used them.
0
FollowupID: 401090

Reply By: MikeEgan - Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 12:05

Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 12:05
went through all this solar panel thing last year. from research found out unisolar was problem with size compared to crystalline and price per watt
size of panels
u64w 1367mm x 742mm
110w crystalline 1315mm x 661mm
80w crystalline 1195mm x 541mm
55w crystalline 996mm x 446mm
that makes the u64w a whopping 15.8 sq cm per watt against 8 sq cm per for crystalline. this is double the size and a problem for carrying and wind

also found out 64w was not sufficient solar for more than 3 months over summer to run 40l fridge and fluoro at night full time. that did not suit at all as wanted sufficient solar capacity to power fridge all year. the more researched solar and spoke to people with solar found those with not enough solar power had to make up some other way for not having enough solar capacity and they were not happy campers the store they bought the solar from had lied. 2 families spoke to with solar had sold the u64w and bought bigger crystalline panels and were happy campers now with the solar setup
from u64w you will get 3.6 amp and using 40l fridge in summer approx 30 amps per day and 6 to 7 hr of sun mid summer to charge battery leaves you short of power and flat battery

price for u64w $640 = $10 per watt
price for 80w crystalline $595 = $7.44 per watt
due to mounting and so could take off camper and park in shade and have panels in sun bought 2 x 55w crystalline for $410 each = $7.45 per watt
the 2 x 55w = 110w are the same area as u64w
difference in price from u64w to 110w = $180 so nearly 2x power for little more money
moral of the story is u64w is poor value for money and problem with size if you need to buy more solar capacity as u64w is not enough solar to do job properly to power 40 l fridge

purchased a 20 amp digital regulator Powertech for $139 incl postage
this reg in the history shows 40l fridge uses 25 to 35 amps a day in summer and 16 to 25 in winter
2 x 55w gives 6.4 amp and is good to power fridge and fluoro light

overall happy camper and glad I did my solar homework well
those stores that tell you u64w or other small panel will run fridge full time and light up your camp are wrong
AnswerID: 147767

Follow Up By: Stu A - Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 12:16

Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 12:16
Thanks Mike - excellent detail.

I thought the UniSolar 64w being an Amphorous type panel was supposed to be shade tolerant etc?

I was also worried that the crystalline type panels would break (ie glass) and were heavier (weight not really important though).

What brand of 55w crystalline panels did you buy?
What size of battery/s do you run?
What type and model of fridge do you use?

Cheers

Stu
0
FollowupID: 401067

Follow Up By: Morgan VIC - Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 13:23

Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 13:23
Stu what does "shade tolerant" mean to you
No solar panel works in the shade. No sun no power
If you are not fully in the sun you are not getting enough power to charge your battery unless you have more solar panels than you need
we had 2 64w Unisolar panels on our caravan which have now been replaced with 3 85w Suntech panels. The 64w Unisolar got destroyed by scratches from passing under trees on roads and tracks in travel. The scratches could not be repaired and water got into the panels and failed. We were pretty upset as the Unisolar were only 2 years old. Last year we were on the Gold Coast in a tourist venue and there was an incredible hail storm bigger than golf balls and thought about the smashed solar panels. The solar panels were fine the vehicles body work was dented. The panels are warranted against hail to 25mm and this hail was 35mm according to weather report. At Caravan show in Melbourne they were walking across 85w panel. The glass panels are 2.5 years old and been down more tracks with trees and no damage. Was an expensive mistake buying Unisolar due to area size as 128 watts of power was not enough and no space for another panel. The 3 85w panels take up less space and now have plenty power. Dont make the mistake so many make like we did and not have enough solar capacity to do the work you need. We trully love the magic of our solar panels
0
FollowupID: 401083

Follow Up By: Stu A - Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 13:28

Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 13:28
Thanks heaps Morgan - great advice - I am taking it all onboard !
Wish I could give all you guys an icy cold beer from my new fridge for all your help and advice - you never know! - one day I might camp next to you !
0
FollowupID: 401084

Follow Up By: MikeEgan - Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 18:26

Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 18:26
Mike I bought Suntech panels
run a 100 amp DC Fullriver battery
have an Engel 40 litre and my twin brother has Waeco 40 litre and he bought the same solar setup as I did. There is no difference according to the regulator in power consumption between the Engel and Waeco.
We do not have our camper battery charging from the vehicle. I looked to see if I could find the circuit diagram the solar dealer sent me and do not appear to have it. We both got our vehicles wired by the same auto electrician for $70 and the system has been faultless. The auto elec commented it was good to see somebody who knew what they were doing with solar and aux battery. The auto elec got the name of the solar dealer from me and bought panels for himself. The assistance and help I got from the dealer was spot on and even if I had found the panels a few dollars cheaper I would have still bought from the same dealer. I did not find the panels any cheaper than what I paid $410 each for 55w panel.
0
FollowupID: 401149

Follow Up By: Stu A - Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 18:46

Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 18:46
Mike
Thanks
Who was the dealer?
Where are you based?
Stu A

0
FollowupID: 401151

Follow Up By: MikeEgan - Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 19:31

Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 19:31
Mike the dealer was Landline Equipment solarpanel@dodo.com.au There is a website but the URL is on my other computer
I am based in Kimba SA and the panels arrived by TNT well packed and insured for $10
From the shirt I had heard from other dealers in my questions I was confident in buying from this dealer. He obviously cared and replied in detail to my emails. In the end it was the only dealer I felt confident with and proved correct.
0
FollowupID: 401155

Follow Up By: big fella - Thursday, Jan 12, 2006 at 16:57

Thursday, Jan 12, 2006 at 16:57
mike i was wondering if you can join the panels together on a base or something ?Second question does the 110w panel have the same output as the 2 55w joined if so why did you choose the 2 55w when the 110w has the smaller dimensions.

Regards BigFella
0
FollowupID: 401347

Follow Up By: MikeEgan - Thursday, Jan 12, 2006 at 18:20

Thursday, Jan 12, 2006 at 18:20
BigFella the 2 55w panels length 996mm size was more suitable for mounting than the 1315 of the 110w panel. Also leaves space for another 55w panel if needed for our long service leave trip. I estimate we will use more power on a long trip for things like laptop and small TV and extra 55w would cover our need
The 110w panel output is the same as 2 55w panels
0
FollowupID: 401372

Reply By: Member - Tonester (VIC) - Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 16:01

Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 16:01
Stu, do you mind if I ask ballpark cost....?
AnswerID: 147810

Follow Up By: Stu A - Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 16:05

Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 16:05
No problem...

UniSolar 64w Panel = $595 (will probably change this to another type)
Steca PR1515 Regulator = $300 approx
Anderson plugs, 10mm cable, fuses etc = $150 approx

0
FollowupID: 401120

Follow Up By: Mainey (WA) - Thursday, Jan 19, 2006 at 01:23

Thursday, Jan 19, 2006 at 01:23
Stu,
the steca 1515 @ $24O Max...
0
FollowupID: 402789

Reply By: Member - John Q (QLD) - Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 19:59

Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 19:59
Hi Stu A,

If you go to the Directory on this site & look up Caravan & Motorhome Books you will find a good article by Collyn Rivers. Also look at the books he has written & I'm sure you will find a title that will suit you. For a novice it is a good place to start & get some info & he provides a wealth of info on a range of sets ups for Campers etc.

John
just crusin & smelling the flowers

1. At Halls Creek (Is he really lost?)
2. East of Cameron Cnr


Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 147859

Reply By: Steve - Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 22:36

Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 22:36
If you are planning on staying 'put' in one spot for a week with a 64w unisolar and the setup you describe you are really kidding yourself...think about maximum 2 days...as for all the other ideas ..well really just get more capacity batteries (like about 400ah setup ) and about triple your panels and then you will have a chance...or instead a small genny and run it every day and bleep the other campers off no end!! It all depends on so much to be factored that trying to 'guestimate' the cheapest solution is an infantile waste of time...SOLAR IS NOT CHEAP OR EFFICIENT !!!!! (IMHO) !!! and I have it !!
AnswerID: 147909

Follow Up By: Morgan VIC - Thursday, Jan 12, 2006 at 03:10

Thursday, Jan 12, 2006 at 03:10
Do you think this person is trying to guesstimate the cheapest solution?
I got the impression the person is looking for the right solution.
Solar is not cheap like a 4WD, camper trailer, caravans are also not cheap but the important thing with solar is to do it right 1st time not 2nd time like we did. If you look at the expected life of solar panels and what they will return you in the years of your life they are a cheap investment. I doubt there is much else that produces so much for so long with no maintenance other than a quick wash once a month or ongoing supplies to run. As to efficient I think solar is mighty efficient and major advantage operates in total silence. Our ability to camp at remote places would be severely hampered without solar. Solar power after paying for the panels is like free electricity. What we have saved in paying for generator fuel maintainence and caravan park fees our solar panels have repaid us well in all ways including much peasceful pleasure.
Yes again we truly love the magic of our solar panels
0
FollowupID: 401260

Reply By: Member - Collyn R (WA) - Friday, Jan 13, 2006 at 14:09

Friday, Jan 13, 2006 at 14:09
Stu

Few brief answers.

1. Single Unisolar is not adequate for the load. Suggest minimum of single 120-watt - but always spend most on module/s not battery capacity because if you cannot generate it you cannot store it.

2. Shadow tolerance. Uni-Solar is way ahead re this. But shadow tolerance does not mean 'shade' tolerance, rather than if a Uni-Solar module is partially shadowed by say a small tree branch - the loss is roughly proportionate to that area shadowed. With other modules you more or less lose the lot!.

3. Essential to use adequate size cabling.

In one of my books I relate fixing a solar set up - where the owner had about 60 metres of twin flex connecting a bank of eight 64-watt modules to his Engel fridge (that barely worked at all). The voltage loss was over 2.0 volts. Replacing that cable by a single heavier one three metres long enabled that fridge to run on one just one module!
Collyn Rivers
AnswerID: 148307

Follow Up By: Stu A - Friday, Jan 13, 2006 at 15:54

Friday, Jan 13, 2006 at 15:54
Thanks Collyn

I was starting to think that also, that is, "more panels, less battery".

I understand the "Shadow Tolerance' better now - thanks.

Based on feedback, I am leaning away from the UniSolar design and more towards the Kyocera Crytalline type panels, so I will have to watch my 'shade tolerance' closely! I am thinking I will hinge 2x 60watt panels together as they will fit inside the vehicle while travelling.

I plan to use a good Steca or PL regulator with LCD display so that will hopefully help me 'locate' the best spot for the panels !

I am still yet to get an answer from anybody on my concern of plugging in the vehicle and 'joining" the 55ah Aux battery in the vehicle to the trailers 80ah battery when I run low on battery storage - do you have any comment on that? Just to re-cap, my concern relates to the Regulator. Becasue it is a 'smart' device and calculates current battery level remaining, hypothetically speaking, if I ran for 3 days on the 80ah trailer battery and I am slowly going backwards, then I plug in the vehicle via the anderson plugs to connect the Aux 55ah battery, does the regulator get confused in it's calculations AND is this compounded if I run the engine and let the altenator top up both batteries also?

Cheers

Stu
0
FollowupID: 401582

Follow Up By: Dilligaf - Friday, Jan 13, 2006 at 18:04

Friday, Jan 13, 2006 at 18:04
after reading this post I purchased 2 x 55w suntech panels for $410 each and a 15 amp morningstar prostar regulator with LCD meter for $255
the meter shows the battery voltage solar panel power in and power out
from many phone calls made today confident the morningstar is the superior regulator
0
FollowupID: 401633

Follow Up By: Mainey (WA) - Thursday, Jan 19, 2006 at 01:32

Thursday, Jan 19, 2006 at 01:32
Dilligaf, you can get a German made Steca 15 amp LCD reg for less than $24O and they are a better quality product.

But as they say, what is cheap is sold cheap.
0
FollowupID: 402792

Reply By: Mike DiD - Friday, Jan 13, 2006 at 19:27

Friday, Jan 13, 2006 at 19:27
Here are some quotes from the Steca Manual -

"Never connect another charging source to the charge regulator. This can destroy
the regulator and/or source."

"Observe that there is no common connection, e.g. across a ground connection, the minus module connections, battery minus and load minus. Non-observance can
damage the regulator!"
- if you connect the car 12 volts to the Reg input and the CT battery to the Reg Output, you will short-circuit the currnet sensor through the Towball.

Other Regulators may work differently.

Mike
AnswerID: 148384

Reply By: Mike DiD - Friday, Jan 13, 2006 at 19:41

Friday, Jan 13, 2006 at 19:41
"2x fluro lights (1ah each for 3hrs per night), water pump (7ah 10mins per day) and shower pump (2ah estimated, 15mins per day). My 100 series has a dual battery setup and the 2nd batt is a 55ah deep cycle"
- The current that a device draws is measured Amps (A), NOT AmpHours (AHr).

If you want to work out how much of the batteries capacity your appliances are using, you need to calculate Amphours -

2x fluro lights (1amp each for 3hrs per night),
= 2 x 1 x 3 = 6 amphours per day

water pump (7amp 10mins per day)
= 7 x 1/6 = 1.2 amphours per day

shower pump (2amp estimated, 15mins per day).
= 2 x 1/4 = 0.5 amphours per day

So the total capacity used per day by these three appliances is per day is -
6 + 1.2 + 0.5 = 7.7 amphours.

The capacity used by the fridge depends very much on ambient temperature and usage pattern.

Mike
AnswerID: 148390

Reply By: Member - Collyn R (WA) - Friday, Jan 13, 2006 at 19:51

Friday, Jan 13, 2006 at 19:51
Stu

Firstly I agree with Diligaf re the regulator: either his suggestion - or my usual preference of Plasmatronic (that preference being mostly because I am far more familiar with the latter and what one can do with it). Both are excellent choices.

Re confusing measurements. There will be a problem if a second battery is connected to the system as the charge history of that battery is not known, or knowable to the regulator at the time of connection. If the two batteries were paralleled then the regulator would read the ingoing charge to both, and the current draw from both. The Ah in/out data would thus be correct.

But, as the previous history of the second battery is unknown to the monitoring system, the 'percentage remaining charge' would become meaningless.

It would all work itself out over a few weeks as the sytems automatically recalibrate now and again - but there's no way you can get an instant readout.

I'd be inclined to accept that the above will happen - and simply ignore the % charge indication completely: in any case it's quite rough and the Ah in/out is quite and a lot more accurate. As long as 10-12% more comes in that goes out (on average) - and the max voltage exceeds about 14.5 on most days all's well.

You could do what you wish by using individual current shunts on each battery - and separate metering - but it's all gets to complex to be worthwhile.
Trust this helps
Collyn Rivers



AnswerID: 148396

Follow Up By: Mainey (WA) - Thursday, Jan 19, 2006 at 01:44

Thursday, Jan 19, 2006 at 01:44
As I posted at #401077 about the Steca solar regulator, OR any reg that shows "State of Charge"

" I don't believe the "SoC" system will work for your setup at all, so run it only on "Voltage" system "

As is said above, more power has to go into the battery than goes out of it, that's the reason for using a larger wattage solar panel setup than your looking at.
(assuming you don't start the vehicle)
0
FollowupID: 402796

Reply By: Mike Harding - Thursday, Jan 19, 2006 at 06:53

Thursday, Jan 19, 2006 at 06:53
All this complication and expense: why not simply stay with (or upgrade) the gas fridge? You're AGM battery will then handle the remaining load for ages.

Mike Harding
AnswerID: 149541

Follow Up By: Stu A - Thursday, Jan 19, 2006 at 06:55

Thursday, Jan 19, 2006 at 06:55
Because the compressor driven fridges are better at cooling - IMHO.
0
FollowupID: 402804

Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Thursday, Jan 19, 2006 at 07:08

Thursday, Jan 19, 2006 at 07:08
Well... it appears you have managed with the gas fridge for 10 years, I've certainly managed with mine for 5 years and although I would agree compressor fridges have some advantages I have my doubts they are worth additional hundreds of dollars for batteries and solar panels etc plus having to nursemaid them regularly to ensure the battery is charged.

If one is on the move daily then a compressor fridge is the way to go but if one stays in the same place for days then give me gas every time.

Mike Harding
0
FollowupID: 402805

Follow Up By: Stu A - Thursday, Jan 19, 2006 at 08:52

Thursday, Jan 19, 2006 at 08:52
Mike, I agree with all your points, but we find that living in Qld (hot & humid) and now having two children, makes us open & close fridge more often and add hot items before bed, so we need the extra grunt of a compressor.

Well at least that is my expectation, I havn't got the fridge yet !

Anyway, i enjoy designing "systems" and "tinkering" (and spending money!) .
Thanks for the feedback

As a matter of interest, what brand/model & size of fridge do you have and how many people does it service?

Stu
0
FollowupID: 402833

Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Thursday, Jan 19, 2006 at 18:20

Thursday, Jan 19, 2006 at 18:20
Yep, fair points. Also I didn't realise you were in Qld and gas fridges are not at their best once the temp goes much over 30C for long periods.

I currently have a Finch (39lt I think) and it only provides for me and sometimes one other person (no woman at the moment :( :) (That's both a sad and a smiley at the same time :) However I am thinking about upgrading to the smaller Chescold which is a fridge/freezer (might be the one you have? - want to sell? :) because I really need to be able to freeze things when I'm out for a couple of weeks or more. How did you find the freezing capability?

Mike Harding
0
FollowupID: 402939

Follow Up By: Stu A - Friday, Jan 20, 2006 at 08:28

Friday, Jan 20, 2006 at 08:28
Hi Mike

My current Gas fridge is a Chescold, from memory it is the R40T (12v, 240v & gas) and holds 40lt, however it is not a "freezing" model. I have had it freeze stuff on a cold winters night when I left it outside running on Max!

Yes - it will be up for sale.
It is in excellent condition and I just had a $95 full service performed on the fridge by the local authorsied Chescold agent. (But I don't think it is a big enought upgrade for you)

Make me an offer anybody !

Stu

PS. Maybe if you bought a BIGGER fridge/freezer then that would equate to attracting a "Woman" and more ":) :) :) "
You know what they say "bigger is better !!!" LOL !

0
FollowupID: 403072

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)