Ice at room temperature.

Submitted: Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 22:51
ThreadID: 29595 Views:2042 Replies:10 FollowUps:6
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Scientists have created ice at room temperature, potentially explaining a mysterious variation in the temperature at which clouds form.
By exposing water to a weak electric field, they have produced what is being called "hot ice". The discovery could answer a question that has perplexed atmospheric scientists for years: why the temperature at which water droplets stick to dust and turn to ice to form clouds varies according to whether the dust particles have been through the process before.
South Korean researchers were surprised that the field needed to create ice at room temperature was only 106 volts per metre, a strength low enough to be found in nature.
If these "mini icebergs" are hiding in cracks in rocks and clay particles and in crevices in proteins in our bodies, their presence could help explain a number of natural processes.
Denys Wheatley, a cell biologist at Aberdeen University, said: "Ice at room temperature just should not happen.
"Water is the crucible of life. Everything else is buzzing around in it. It seems that this most common of liquids in our bodies is one of the least understood."
In 2003 a computer simulation carried out by Dutch biophysicists suggested that, by introducing an electric field, it should be possible to impose an orderly structure on the hydrogen and oxygen atoms in water molecules, freezing it at room temperature.
Eun-Mi Choi and colleagues at Seoul National University created ice at room temperature by trapping a thin layer of water between a metal plate and a thin metal tip. When the tip was moved downwards while a weak electric field was applied, it hit ice at 0.7 nanometres below the plate.
The research was published in the American journal Physical Review Letters and reported in this week's New Scientist.
I have searched some more results of this process on the net, and whilst it is still in the realms of nano-technology, the chemistry is promising.
If research continues, there may well be a spin off or two for the general populace. I’m already thinking of really efficient fridge / freezers for the 4 x 4 industry.

Oh, this’ll be waaaaay better than Roachies 12 volt toaster btw... lol...

Wolfie
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Reply By: Member - Captain (WA) - Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 22:57

Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 22:57
Ahh, but Wolfie, while it may technically be ice, its "hot ice" and will probably keep your beer at 20C. Now wouldn't that be something, to have a warm can of frozen beer!!!

Cheers

Captain
AnswerID: 147914

Follow Up By: Rick (S.A.) - Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 23:01

Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 23:01
Wolfie, is 0.7 nanometres (below the plate) about the length of a shoelace?

HahahaahaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaR
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FollowupID: 401216

Reply By: Member - David 0- Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 22:59

Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 22:59
That's pretty impressive, but how would "hot" ice keep things cool?????
AnswerID: 147915

Follow Up By: Member - David 0- Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 23:02

Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 23:02
Geez captain you were fast with that mouse button...beat me to it.

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Reply By: Big Kidz (Andrew & Jen) - Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 23:03

Wednesday, Jan 11, 2006 at 23:03
Now I am thinking of ice creams that don't melt all over the car - would it taste just as good if it was warm? We could keep ice cream in the glovebox!

Andrew
AnswerID: 147916

Reply By: Nudenut - Thursday, Jan 12, 2006 at 07:50

Thursday, Jan 12, 2006 at 07:50
I'm out of a job! bloody hell, looks like me and mainey had better get in the dole queue
AnswerID: 147949

Reply By: Member - JohnR (Vic)&Moses - Thursday, Jan 12, 2006 at 08:23

Thursday, Jan 12, 2006 at 08:23
Wolfie, I say you do find em don't you. Just imagine a new world of freezing the water bottle just by plugging in the bottom to the drink holder. I wonder how far away. Love Andrew's glovebox ice creams.

Something else you mention was an icebreaker though. When visiting the 'Monarch of the Glen' country three years back we found that a particular B&B was a little chilly in it's welcome to us Aussies. Having spied the New Scientist magazine on the table in the lounge I mentioned the subsription to the owner and how I enjoyed reading it online since I discovered the site on an internet search some years previoulsy. The thaw was gushing. A fantastic rate of improvement in the form of welcome. Just the opposite of your electric room temperature ice.
Cheers,
Who?
John

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AnswerID: 147953

Follow Up By: Member - David 0- Thursday, Jan 12, 2006 at 09:11

Thursday, Jan 12, 2006 at 09:11
He probably assumed you were an antipodean troglodite, there are some in that part of the world who think anyone from Australia is best described that way. He was probably
1. shocked that Australians got NS
2. shocked that you could read
3. shocked that you were interested in such subject matter

:-)
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Follow Up By: Footloose - Thursday, Jan 12, 2006 at 10:11

Thursday, Jan 12, 2006 at 10:11
John, if you registered under the usual Oz non de plume, i.e. "Barry McKenzie", it's no wonder the welcome was icy :))
I found that part of the world to be most hospitable. There was, however, a small matter of tealeaves in the bottom of my coffee at one establishment.
"My goodness", I thought, "it isn't only the people that get a wash once a week !!"
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Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic)&Moses - Thursday, Jan 12, 2006 at 13:09

Thursday, Jan 12, 2006 at 13:09
I am sure our hostess was the sort of person who would never of known of Our Barry although may have observed our luscious Dame Edna talking with Mrs Kwin (the queen) or Sir Les Patterson assulting the language, even perhaps Rolf Harris.

Loosie, I guess it takes a lot of energy to warm the water of the loch to get the hands in it prior to washing cups or your nether regions.

Met some fun people too in the North, including one Scot just South of the border who showed me where they put the non payers at their establisment. An old Roman well found about 30 years ago under the old house kitchen.

Stayed in an hotel one night where I asked if the chef had any 'new world' experience, to be told he is Australian. The food was teriffic just by Loch Lomond...
Cheers,
Who?
John

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Reply By: porl - Thursday, Jan 12, 2006 at 10:26

Thursday, Jan 12, 2006 at 10:26
I'm thinking if i apply the correct voltage to my mitochondria I may be able to chill my beer can under my armpit.
AnswerID: 147986

Reply By: Neil & Lynne - Thursday, Jan 12, 2006 at 11:58

Thursday, Jan 12, 2006 at 11:58
What next???

Snap frozen boiling water.......Simply thaw & make a hot cuppa.

Gotta get some of that.

Neil.
AnswerID: 148005

Reply By: GOB & denny vic member - Thursday, Jan 12, 2006 at 20:45

Thursday, Jan 12, 2006 at 20:45
goodday wolfie

was that voltage ac or dc as it the difference may play a large part as we all try out this fantastic theory
ac we can get from a power point but dc is going to take a bit more work

steve

AnswerID: 148147

Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Thursday, Jan 12, 2006 at 21:08

Thursday, Jan 12, 2006 at 21:08
AC or DC we will all be on the H/Way To Hell if we all have our beer at a frozen 20deg ,,then again be nice to meet up with Bon Scott again.
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Reply By: MartyB - Thursday, Jan 12, 2006 at 23:13

Thursday, Jan 12, 2006 at 23:13
Ice at room temp?
Easy, just have the room temp below 0 deg.
Keeps the beer cold too.

Marty.
AnswerID: 148204

Reply By: Keith_A (Qld) - Thursday, Jan 12, 2006 at 23:56

Thursday, Jan 12, 2006 at 23:56
Hi Wolfie - one of my favorite books has a quote :
'My own suspicion is that the universe is not only queerer than we suppose, but queerer than we can suppose' - (From' Entanglement' - Amir Aczel).
Good to know there are still puzzles to solve (& long live Schrodingers cat).
Thanks for the post....................Keith
AnswerID: 148219

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