Full sized slide on camping box

Submitted: Sunday, Feb 05, 2006 at 21:41
ThreadID: 30462 Views:1548 Replies:3 FollowUps:7
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I am looking at having a full sized camping box made and am wondering about aluminium v steel. The box will be big enough to sleep in.

I know many aluminium roof racks become stressed and wonder if a 2.2 x 1.8 x 1.2m high camping box may have the same stress problems in aluminium. I have seen both steel and alloy boxes about but feel the aluminium may not stand up to the outback corrugated roads and other vibrations.

Any thoughts gladly received.
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Reply By: Member - Reiner G (QLD) - Sunday, Feb 05, 2006 at 22:01

Sunday, Feb 05, 2006 at 22:01
Hi Chris, I had one many years ago and build it out of sandwich panel or coldroom panel steel on both sides and 50mm thick. Very easy to work with and you can walk all over the roof. Stays cool inside and very solid.
A single skin roof either aluminium or steel gets very hot.

cheers
Reiner
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Follow Up By: Chris Drew - Sunday, Feb 05, 2006 at 22:05

Sunday, Feb 05, 2006 at 22:05
Thanks Reiner, I had the notion that I would stick insulating material to the inside, like a dense foam from Clarke Rubber.

Chris
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Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic)&Moses - Sunday, Feb 05, 2006 at 23:17

Sunday, Feb 05, 2006 at 23:17
Chris, i have worked with sandwich panel too, just remember it has two steel thicknesses. The only reason I look to some insulation in my camper box is because of interior condensation. Half an inch of insulation would cure that - as you say, Clark Rubber. 50 mm of sandwhich panel is more lift to the roof too. Have used 50mm and 100mm round a building. The first person who actually stopped me had a sandwhich panel box and I saw him again on my first practice trip two days later.

In winter I have a doonah to cover me, in summer a woven cotton blanket. Sides open or closed dependent on the temperature too and you have seen, insect screened.

Our box has an aluminium roof we can walk over too by the way, checker plate and made to carry loads - hence some of the weight. I have stood on top and carried firewood there and NO dents.
Cheers,
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Follow Up By: Eric from Cape York Connections - Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 08:16

Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 08:16
John have you got any pictures of the box please sounds interesting.

All the best
Eric
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Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic)&Moses - Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 08:37

Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 08:37
Eric, I put up a post with the pictures on EO Page for Chris a few weeks back. I thought about sandwich panel when I built this one or rather had it built.
Cheers,
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Follow Up By: Eric from Cape York Connections - Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 08:53

Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 08:53
John looks like a good set up did you design it yourself
I notice you have the 30 second tent when do use it.
Looks a good set up

All the best
Eric
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Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic)&Moses - Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 09:37

Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 09:37
Chris, I see you are looking at something about 200mm shorter than mine which is useful for keeping weight forward and lower. I am about 6'4" or used to be so I like to be able to stretch out. The box gives me 6' matresses plus a bedhead come storage box of an extra foot.. 7' internal easily.

Eric, thank you. Yes, Heather and I sat down a few times to design it and talked with the guy who built it a few times. He told me he could have sold it four times the week it sat in his shed before we picked it up. He has built quite a few since and builds for overseas order now too. Three photos in his current brochure I think.

The 30 second tent is quick and easy. No pegs or poles as it clips on pins on the top of the box and slides away from the box to tension the top/annex. We can be sitting under cover with beer in hand inside 10 minutes. Have had a cooked brekkie after the cereal, washed the dishes and packed and on the road in an hour after waking when out and around.
Cheers,
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John

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Reply By: Eric Experience. - Sunday, Feb 05, 2006 at 22:06

Sunday, Feb 05, 2006 at 22:06
Chris.
You do not say where the box will be carried, but a major consideration in things like roof racks is the flexing of the vehicle. If you place a rigid box on a vehicle tray that is flexible the box will break regardless of the material if it is welded if you use rivits it will last longer. Truck cabins are mounted on rubber and then mostly in only 3 places.
Eric.
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Follow Up By: Chris Drew - Sunday, Feb 05, 2006 at 22:19

Sunday, Feb 05, 2006 at 22:19
Thanks for your comments Eric.

The box will cover the tray back of a Landcruiser 79 series ute, 2.2m long and 1.8 m wide. The existing ute tray is reasonably heavy steel frame and is mounted on four points at the chassis. I think I should expect some flex in the chassis, if the box is held down tightly to the tray this will translate into flex in the box.

I am thinking I should allow the box to float free of the tray, using the three point system on rubber pads like you mention may be the way to go.

Thanks for this brilliant idea! This has probably gone a good way to solving my dilemma.

Chris
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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 15:21

Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 15:21
Hi Chris,

I think your concern is wise. I think a lot boils down to how well its constructed.

Mine is 12mths old. Size is 2.2m (L) x 1.25m(H) x 1.75m (W), and is made out of 3mm aluminium for the sides, and 3mm Chequerplate for the floor. All the edges are turned, and with overlaps etc its very strong. The only internal reinforcement is on the front and back panels. Its bolted down to the tray. Made by a bosybuider in Adelaide called GSV.

Done plenty of corrugations without an issue so far.

As far as heat goes, I find the bright white finish refects the heat very well - so I have not found the need for insulation. I also think that maybe the lack of insulation helps it to cool down at night.

Cheers
Phil
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