gas bottle question

Submitted: Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 12:44
ThreadID: 30477 Views:17099 Replies:9 FollowUps:5
This Thread has been Archived
just reading a post about swap-n-go refilled gas bottles and there was lots of mention about checking the tank date.
question is whats the date where is it and why do i have to check it.
ive had my bottle for 20 years with no problems never been any trouble getting refilled infact it was refilled a few weeks ago
cheers
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Vince NSW - Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 12:50

Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 12:50
Bottles have a life of 10 years, after which they must be retested of disposed of. It is an offence to refill a bottle that is out of date.
The cost of testing is now only a few $ less that a new bottle from SuperCheap, so not worth it.
The date will be on the top or bottom ring, and for a bottle made in Feb of 2006 would look like "02-06"
Vince
AnswerID: 153319

Follow Up By: itsdave - Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 16:11

Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 16:11
Yes you can get fairly cheap bottles nowadays but the quality of bottles 20 odd years old is quite often superior so worth while having them tested. Just had mine done again for the second time and each time by law they replaced the valve and filled it for around 30-40 $. Also by having your own tested at least you know the history of your bottle.

cheers Dave
0
FollowupID: 407300

Reply By: Member - Blue (VIC) - Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 13:05

Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 13:05
I haven't checked it out(my bottles are only a couple of years old) but I was told SuperGas will inspect, restamp and fill for about ~$30/9kg bottle... Could've been BS but may be worth a call...
AnswerID: 153324

Follow Up By: Member - Blue (VIC) - Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 13:11

Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 13:11
I believe they pull the valve out, look around with a torch for rust, check the valve integrity, add new sealant and refit the valve... FWIW, I pulled the valve out of a 20yo bottle a few months back(making a BBQ out of it), washed and flooded it with argon while cutting it in half long ways... Once apart, I could obviously inspect the entire internals and there was no sign of any rust or other damage to the inside. This bottle had sat empty(open the valve and nothing at all came out) for over 5 years. Getting them tested should be a hassle free undertaking.
0
FollowupID: 407252

Reply By: macca172 - Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 13:50

Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 13:50
Hydrostatic testing of gas bottles is every ten years in accordance with the relevant AS/NZ standards. As you have said "ive had my bottle for 20 years with no problems". I would suggest that the next time you use it, a problem may occur? Do yourself a favour, take it to Swap N Go and replace it with a compliant cylinder. As for the person who refilled your current out of date cylinder, well he is either a thrill seeker or just an idiot that shouldnt have the responsibility of doing such tasks.
AnswerID: 153334

Reply By: revhead307 - Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 14:34

Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 14:34
I have been guilty in the past of seeking out small dodgy service stations to fill my out of date gas bottles.

even went to the trouble of repainting one so it looked new so they wouldnt check the date.

At the time unwillingness to part with $$ to get it tested or replaced.

However one day the valve stuck open on one, had to rush it outside etc luckily no one was hurt...

So now I only use new gas bottles, hoses etc.

While there may be nothing physically wrong with an old bottle...and may give hassle free performance for years to come...the 10 expiry is a safety thing..and should be adhered to

Rev

AnswerID: 153347

Reply By: dags666 - Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 16:26

Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 16:26
the bottles rust from the inside out as it is liquid gas and the valves dont last forever beter to be safe than sorry a 9 kg bottle of liquid when turns to gas expands something like 750 times as my bottles run out i change them to a exchange let someone else have the worry dags
AnswerID: 153368

Reply By: Boc1971 - Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 16:55

Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 16:55
Have you guys ever see a gas bottle in a car that has been faulty -- and a small spark ignited the gas ?? - not much car left to drive around in ......

ever seen a house full of gas ignite? will blow every window out and kill anyone inside ... scares the crap out of the neighbours .... upsets family members , but they do get a good feed at your wake ....

You people that THINK your gas bottles are ok after 10 years of service and think a visual test will be all thats needed?....... YOUR WRONG -- remove the valve and shine a torch in .... YOUR WRONG.........

YOU WILL NEED gas detectors --- and for some of the larger bottles - a thickness tester ... you can not trust the local petrol shop attendant to know about this stuff - half of them are high school drop outs without any skilled qualifications except what they learn at 17 yrs old .... " WANT FRIES WITH THAT ?"

whats the life of your family worth to you ? --- Gas bottles are like Brake shoes -- use them to there service limit --- THROW AWAY ...

Frank

AnswerID: 153379

Reply By: slow mower - Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 17:55

Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 17:55
Have a look at Post 30228 and then, hopefully, you and everyone else, with a serious lack of concern for their and family safety, will have second thoughts about saving a few dollars 'here and there'. Sorry to be so blunt, BUT too many users of LPG just don't understand the potential for disasterif a BLEVE should occur. REMEMBER....it doesn't require an ignition source...a rapid decompression is all it takes. That could be from a pin sized rust hole or a leaky valve/thread.

Cheers
AnswerID: 153392

Follow Up By: Member - John - Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 19:43

Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 19:43
Bull bleep , read what a BLEVE actually is before writing crap as you have. "REMEMBER....it doesn't require an ignition source...a rapid decompression is all it takes. That could be from a pin sized rust hole or a leaky valve/thread".
John

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 407354

Follow Up By: Waynepd (NSW) - Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 21:52

Monday, Feb 06, 2006 at 21:52
Actually I was surprised too, as I work in the petro industry and have seen films of BLEVE's. Slow Mower is correct. A fire under the pressure vessel is not the only way to cause a BLEVE.....

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BLEVE

A BLEVE does not require a flammable substance to occur, and therefore is not usually considered a type of chemical explosion. However, if the substance involved is flammable, it is likely that the resulting cloud of the substance will ignite after the BLEVE proper has occurred, forming a fireball and possibly a fuel-air explosion. BLEVEs can also be caused by an external fire nearby the storage vessel causing heating of the contents and pressure build-up.
0
FollowupID: 407395

Follow Up By: Member - John - Tuesday, Feb 07, 2006 at 10:10

Tuesday, Feb 07, 2006 at 10:10
Waynepd, the relevant point is, "after the BLEVE proper has occurred". I rest my case. :-)
John

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 407471

Reply By: Member - Oldplodder (QLD) - Tuesday, Feb 07, 2006 at 09:36

Tuesday, Feb 07, 2006 at 09:36
I don't think any one has mentioned that the date of manufacture is stamped on the top guard. Work 10 years from that date.
If you don't have a top guard (like my old one - 40 years old) it is illegal to fill.
Any checks that are passed are also stamped on the top guard.

If the cylinder has less than 6 months on it, do what my brother in law does, and take in to a swap and go.

Also, have heard that the chinese made cylinders do rust internally a lot quicker than the aussie made ones, so buy aussie :-).
AnswerID: 153559

Reply By: Member - Charlie M (SA) - Tuesday, Feb 07, 2006 at 19:08

Tuesday, Feb 07, 2006 at 19:08
Sone of the chinese ones dont hold 9kgs either
Cheers
Charlie
AnswerID: 153678

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)