Kill switches

Submitted: Wednesday, Jan 22, 2003 at 22:16
ThreadID: 3060 Views:2622 Replies:11 FollowUps:5
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Looking at installing a kill switch on my diesel gq. My old mate in petrol head days, used to put the switch in line with the fuel pump. Is this the best circuit for a diesel? If not what circuits are most suitable? Thanks Andrew.
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Reply By: Truckster - Wednesday, Jan 22, 2003 at 22:49

Wednesday, Jan 22, 2003 at 22:49
Not sure but this is talked about on another forum at the moment.

A good place for the switch is the Ciggy lighter... If it aint in, the car dont run! or other way around...

Who would check that out!
AnswerID: 11716

Reply By: Kev. - Wednesday, Jan 22, 2003 at 23:19

Wednesday, Jan 22, 2003 at 23:19
Andrew, I had the same trouble coming from petrol motors to diesel.
the only thing i could find was the wiring to the fuel pump on the engine.
On my toyota 4.2L there is a plug that leads to the pump and what i did was to unplug it then with the ignition on use a multimeter and check what pin in the plug had 12volts.
Then cut the wire to that pin half way along the loom then connect the two plugs and turn over the engine, if it dosn't start you have the right wire. Just join the two wires to a switch under the dash and your away.

Sounds like you know how to instal it anyway once you find the circuit but this info may be useful to others.

I have always used killswitches as it is peace of mind.
(You can also shift the 4wd lever to neutral)

Kev.
AnswerID: 11718

Reply By: Eric - Wednesday, Jan 22, 2003 at 23:29

Wednesday, Jan 22, 2003 at 23:29
Andrew.
You diesel gq does not have an electric pump, the simllest way to fit a anty theft device in a gq is to find the socket near the gear box, that normaly connects to the start inhibit switch on the automatic version. this socket has a plug in it with a small loop of wire to bypas the switch on the manual version. Remove that plug cut the wire loop and install a switch across the cut wires replug it and the jobs done. Eric.
AnswerID: 11720

Follow Up By: Rusty - Wednesday, Jan 22, 2003 at 23:34

Wednesday, Jan 22, 2003 at 23:34
Does an 80 series cruiser have the same set up as you just mentioned. Because that sounds like a very good setup.
Russell
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FollowupID: 6649

Reply By: goodsy - Wednesday, Jan 22, 2003 at 23:34

Wednesday, Jan 22, 2003 at 23:34
I think that Kev and eric are talking about the supply to the fuel cut off solenoid. This will stop the motor from startin for sure.
AnswerID: 11721

Follow Up By: Goodsy - Wednesday, Jan 22, 2003 at 23:37

Wednesday, Jan 22, 2003 at 23:37
Sorry not Eric just Kev.
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FollowupID: 6650

Reply By: diamond - Wednesday, Jan 22, 2003 at 23:57

Wednesday, Jan 22, 2003 at 23:57
we get quite a few cars in at work with a kill switch which is a simple cut wire from ignition to starter where they have a little steel button about 3mill in diameter and somehow you have to touch the button at the same time you touch the key to send an earth through to the ignition damned if i can ever find them lol might pay to ask an auto elec sounds a very cheap/simple efective way if you dont touch the button you dont get earth also if you do find out please let us know oh yes you hide the button somewhere lol
AnswerID: 11723

Reply By: ExplorOz Team - David - Thursday, Jan 23, 2003 at 02:57

Thursday, Jan 23, 2003 at 02:57
I always used to use kill switches in my vehicles until I came to WA where it is mandatory to have imobilisers installed. I will never bother with a kill switch and will now always go with the imobiliser system. They work very very well. They of course do cost more than a couple of dollars but my vehicle is worth every cent of the few hundred dollars. It costs me more to fill it with fuel than a good quality imobiliser system that not only kills the iginition but provides access to the central locking to lock/unlock the vehicle etc etc.

If you have the bucks then go for the imobiliser system.

David
switched on to switch off.....
AnswerID: 11728

Follow Up By: Oziexplorer - Thursday, Jan 23, 2003 at 11:05

Thursday, Jan 23, 2003 at 11:05
The Australian made Cyclops TWO point engine immobiliser are around $80 and probably could quite happily say one of the better units on the market.
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FollowupID: 6664

Reply By: Hoffy - Thursday, Jan 23, 2003 at 11:28

Thursday, Jan 23, 2003 at 11:28
I installed a kill switch in the fuel solenoid line on my series 80 Cruiser. I used a relay to switch the current and installed it near the injector pump. The switch was hidden inside the cabin. I also installed a small piezo buzzer, as a reminder, that is activated if you turn the ignition on and have the kill switch on. This sure beats the hell out of trying to start the motor with the kill switch on.

Keith
AnswerID: 11748

Follow Up By: Kev. - Thursday, Jan 23, 2003 at 12:53

Thursday, Jan 23, 2003 at 12:53
Hoffy,
That would work fine but my way of thinking is if you can keep it simple there are less things that can go wrong , mainly out bush.
Over time the heat of the engine plus water in the plug in conections may cause it to fail. Being a diesel engine that are good at water crossings you dont want the pump circuit to let you down .
Thats why i soldered all conections and used heat shrink (marine shrink is good) to lessen problems later. Easly fixed on the track but still anoying.

Kev.
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FollowupID: 6670

Reply By: Hoffy - Thursday, Jan 23, 2003 at 13:46

Thursday, Jan 23, 2003 at 13:46
Kev
I cut the fuel solenoid wire in the loom down near the pump. soldered suitable size cable to the two ends then used heat shrink tubing over each joint. I then taped each joint and taped the wire onto the loom. This wire was brought up to the area near the main battery and wired to the base of an automotive relay. The relay had a lug on it to alloy attaching to the body. All joints are soldered - I hate crimps. The coil connection is brought to the area under the dash where ignition 12 volts is picked up. I used a double pole double throw switch to give the kill switch "on" indication.

I put the cable in the engine bay in a manner which is difficult to distinguish it from the original factory wiring.

This has worked well for 8 years now. Should the relay fail in the bush it is a simple matter of shorting out the relay contacts out.

Keith
AnswerID: 11752

Reply By: Kev. - Thursday, Jan 23, 2003 at 17:33

Thursday, Jan 23, 2003 at 17:33
Hoffy
Fair enough, every one does thing differently i suppose.
Just a bit puzzled as relays are usually used to switch high current loads like air comp's and spot lights ect without running heavy wire back in the cab. Not needed in this case as there is minimal voltage drop but im only nit picking.
Good to see people can do these simple tasks themselves as i know some people who cant do anything but change a fuse.

Kev.
AnswerID: 11760

Follow Up By: Hoffy - Friday, Jan 24, 2003 at 11:49

Friday, Jan 24, 2003 at 11:49
Kev

I guess I like to do the'belt and braces" trick. Being an electronics tech I felt the relay was the cleanest way to go, in my opinion. Toyota seem to use relays for areas where the current is relatively low. As they say there is many ways to skin a cat.

Cheers

Keith
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FollowupID: 6733

Reply By: Eric - Thursday, Jan 23, 2003 at 22:28

Thursday, Jan 23, 2003 at 22:28
Rusty.
The 80 series does have a similar plug, probably under the console near the gear lever, I havent done one so would have to explore. Eric.
AnswerID: 11779

Reply By: Kev. - Friday, Jan 24, 2003 at 17:53

Friday, Jan 24, 2003 at 17:53
Cool, im a sparky with an instrumentation ticket but have to admit i dont like working on auto electrics much.
Hey , as long as it works .

Have a good weekend !!!

Kev.
AnswerID: 11817

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