Does a 2003 Trition have a timing belt?

Submitted: Saturday, Feb 11, 2006 at 21:31
ThreadID: 30692 Views:11113 Replies:3 FollowUps:11
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Just flicken thru my service manual , to see when my 2003 MK triton needs its timing belt changed - it appears it doesnt. Nothing mentioned in any of the services, especially the 105K service. Does it have a timing chain instead?

Thoughts
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Reply By: Member - Blue (VIC) - Saturday, Feb 11, 2006 at 22:12

Saturday, Feb 11, 2006 at 22:12
Timing belt it has... Mine changed out at 90k, couple of weeks ago... Have to pull half the bloody engine out to change it so it costs a bomb... $600+

That's if you're talking about the V6...
AnswerID: 154497

Reply By: Billowaggi - Saturday, Feb 11, 2006 at 23:59

Saturday, Feb 11, 2006 at 23:59
Dont look in the service pages[you know, the ones you get stamped] have a look at the preventative maintainance section before them. Petrol and diesel both have Tbelts, service interval 100,000km. If it is the first time ie. 100,000 you should be OK just doing the belt, next time around the guide bearings and tensioner should be replaced as well [expensive!]
Regards Ken.
AnswerID: 154506

Follow Up By: Kiwi Kia - Sunday, Feb 12, 2006 at 07:30

Sunday, Feb 12, 2006 at 07:30
First let me say that I have no special knowledge of the vehicle model you are refering to.

However, I would always change the tensioner and idler bearing when changeing a timeing belt. If you don't have tension the belt may jump teeth on a sprocket and do untold $ worth of damage. An idler bearing costs peanuts compared to the cost of pulling everything to bits to replace it. My advice - do the lot. The cost of parts is not great it's the labour charge (time) to pull it all to bits and put it back together again thats cost the $. Any motor mechanic worth a pinch of salt would recomend the above. What does the manufacturer recomend?
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Follow Up By: Billowaggi - Sunday, Feb 12, 2006 at 15:38

Sunday, Feb 12, 2006 at 15:38
I think that the manufaturer says change the belt and check the idlers and tensioner. Most vehicles now use a hydraulic tensioner , you just look for leeks. The parts for these belt systems are reasonable if they are available through the aftermarket, if you have to buy genuine they can be very expensive. Example a late model Holden Jackeroo V6 that I recently did
Belt $95
Tensioner $335
Guide and bearing $90
Tensioner bearing $210
Labour 3.5 @ $60
Apart from the belt all the parts were genuine only. At the first time change of the timing belt I check all the bearings and tensioner are OK and replace if not, at the second and subsequent change I replace regardless.
Ken.
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Follow Up By: Billowaggi - Sunday, Feb 12, 2006 at 15:46

Sunday, Feb 12, 2006 at 15:46
PS I have been using this system for twenty years and hundreds of timing belts and have not had a failure.
Ken.
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FollowupID: 408526

Follow Up By: 120scruiser - Sunday, Feb 12, 2006 at 20:47

Sunday, Feb 12, 2006 at 20:47
Billowaggi I would change your system when dealing with some of these European vehicles such as Astra and Vectras.
Replace belts and tensioners at 60 000 km.
Hyundai I would start changing at the 75 000 km mark.
When you do Astras, they have a different type tensioner so you need the modified retaining bolt as well.

For the record the 3.0 V6 engine runs a timing belt.
The 2.8 diesel 4 cylinder uses timing chain. No servicing of the chain is required. It appears alot of modern engines are reverting back to chains.
Cheers
120scruiser
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Follow Up By: Billowaggi - Sunday, Feb 12, 2006 at 21:51

Sunday, Feb 12, 2006 at 21:51
Hi 120 I have so far kept clear of euro [by choice] I have listened to stories through the trade and looked at the procedures in the timing belt book and have been content to send them to the dealers. Unlike Japanese vehicles special tools are required and I am aware that service intervals are shorter.
Regards Ken.
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FollowupID: 408595

Follow Up By: 120scruiser - Monday, Feb 13, 2006 at 08:02

Monday, Feb 13, 2006 at 08:02
Astra and Vectras are easy so long as you change the belt at 60k and not 120k like the book says. Some can go to 120 but I change all at 60 including tensioner. The only special tools you need are the Torxs bits. They are based on the old Camira engine but you don't need to rotate the water pump. They have put in a tensioner bearing which is spring loaded. Have a go its fun. The policy in my workshop is for one mechanic to do the job then rotate the engine twice. After that another mechanic has to check tension and timing marks. I don't care how easy the belt is they all have to follow these rules and we haven't had one failure yet.
Cheers
120scruiser
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Follow Up By: Billowaggi - Monday, Feb 13, 2006 at 10:26

Monday, Feb 13, 2006 at 10:26
That is a good policy and I can see the reason for it, everything about timing belt fitment is critical, trouble is there is only one of me! so I have to be extra carefull.
Regards Ken.
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Reply By: Member - Jack - Sunday, Feb 12, 2006 at 15:23

Sunday, Feb 12, 2006 at 15:23
I am happy to be corrected if I am wrong, but I was told some time ago that ...

"diesels have belts and petrol engines have chains" .... is this correct? Any reason for it?

Jack
The hurrieder I go, the behinder I get. (Lewis Carroll-Alice In Wonderland)

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AnswerID: 154570

Follow Up By: Billowaggi - Sunday, Feb 12, 2006 at 15:44

Sunday, Feb 12, 2006 at 15:44
I think about 90% all modern engines petrol or diesel have a timing belt, some are simple and cheap to replace, others like on twin cam V6 engines can be very complicated.
Regards Ken.
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FollowupID: 408523

Follow Up By: garrycol - Sunday, Feb 12, 2006 at 16:24

Sunday, Feb 12, 2006 at 16:24
Whether an engine is a diesel or petrol has no bearing on whether it has a belt or a chain - just depends on engine design and designers preference.

Cheers

Garry
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Follow Up By: Stoo - Sunday, Feb 12, 2006 at 19:08

Sunday, Feb 12, 2006 at 19:08
I bought my 97 MK diesel at 90,000 KM, and took it in to a diesel mechanic for a timing belt change. I busted a belt on my last mitsubishi which broke the rockers in half and bent the valves etc. so I didn't want to take any risks. He told me it didn't have belts, it had a chain. Current diesel Tritons are still a 4M40 engine I believe so I'd say if it's a diesel they still run a chain.
Stu
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Follow Up By: Member - Jack - Sunday, Feb 12, 2006 at 21:11

Sunday, Feb 12, 2006 at 21:11
OK, thanks. That clears it up for me.

Cheers
jack
The hurrieder I go, the behinder I get. (Lewis Carroll-Alice In Wonderland)

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