single line pull

Submitted: Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 22:33
ThreadID: 30990 Views:2131 Replies:12 FollowUps:13
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hey readers,
just wondering, should a 9000lb winch be able to pull a 2 tonne truck up a fairly steep hill (35 degrees) difficult enough to walk up, with a single line pull? Mine died after 10 metres, dash lights were gone. I take it the batteries are on their last legs.

thanks in advance.
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Reply By: Mad Dog (Australia) - Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 22:41

Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 22:41
What died the winch or the batteries went flat. Did you have to motor running ?
AnswerID: 156146

Follow Up By: conman - Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 22:44

Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 22:44
engine was running, it was the first time i had to use the winch, but id flick the switch and the radio would dim out. the baterry has got to be 4 yrs old.
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FollowupID: 410179

Follow Up By: Mad Dog (Australia) - Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 23:06

Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 23:06
Not sure if you have one or two batteries, first post you say batteries, second post battery, in any case sounds like you sucked them dry pretty quick. Take them down to a battery seller for a load test.
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Follow Up By: Rob from Cairns Offroad Training & Tours - Tuesday, Feb 21, 2006 at 13:54

Tuesday, Feb 21, 2006 at 13:54
Sounds typical of power winch performance to me. I honestly believe they are not worth the hassle. Too expensive, heavy, unreliable, constant maintenance. Adverise it. you will get a good price for it because people are led to believe they are necessary equipment. Buy a hand winch and a couple of snatch blocks and your winching problems are over. Cheers Rob
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Follow Up By: conman - Tuesday, Feb 21, 2006 at 18:52

Tuesday, Feb 21, 2006 at 18:52
Hmm,
Don't know about handwinching 30 meters or so.
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Follow Up By: Rob from Cairns Offroad Training & Tours - Tuesday, Feb 21, 2006 at 19:28

Tuesday, Feb 21, 2006 at 19:28
Better alternative than dieing after 10 mts and going nowhere. Hard work but at least your safe and outa there. Cheers Rob
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Reply By: conman - Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 22:46

Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 22:46
Tell you what though, i'll be looking for some synthetic rope, not fun looking up, while the car issitting on a winch cable
AnswerID: 156147

Reply By: Member - Jon W (QLD) - Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 22:50

Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 22:50
Conman,
Without taking friction into account, it amounts to a pull of approx 2500 lbs. A 9000 lb winch should be capable of this.
Jon W
AnswerID: 156149

Reply By: johannagoanna - Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 23:18

Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 23:18
This may be a silly question - but did you read the manual? The winch should only be run for a very short time (usually less than 1 minute), and then given down time, before repeating the cycle. Most people don't do this, and wonder why it doesn't work well. Read the manual, and let us know what it says! - Jo
AnswerID: 156157

Follow Up By: conman - Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 23:21

Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 23:21
only got 5 or 10 metres, not blaming anything, just wondering if a single line pull is easy enough for a 9000lb winch.
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FollowupID: 410190

Reply By: Member - Omaroo (NSW) - Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 23:23

Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 23:23
con

It also depends on how much of the cable you had wound out. A winch will pull more easily if there are less winds left on the drum (think of it as lower gearing). If you have a nearly full drum it's much harder work for the winch.

Secondly - what sort of battery are you using to run the winch? Lots of people I know have had accessory places wire their winch (without consultation) to an auxilliary battery in a dual battery setup - only to find that they have specified a deep-cycle which is also used to power the fridge, radio and lights.

Not good. Use a cranking battery. The bigger the better. The newer the better.

Cheers
Chris
AnswerID: 156160

Follow Up By: conman - Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 23:26

Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 23:26
yeah Chris it was almost fully wound out only a couple of winds left, Still want to know if a single line pull is easy for a 9000lb winch in this condition. Does everyone else do it easy, or do they pull out a pulley block?

Definitely hooked to a big cranking battery.
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FollowupID: 410192

Reply By: Rock Crawler - Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 23:25

Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 23:25
What brand winch is it ? sounds like the winch was shorting out , or the battery was totally stuffed. This is why I hate dual battery systems , I have 2 batteries connected in Parallel and one has a isolation terminal for overnight stays
AnswerID: 156162

Reply By: johannagoanna - Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 23:30

Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 23:30
Of course the winch should pull it, but you need to do it in short bursts with a rest time inbetween, otherwise you will cook the winch and kill your battery - read the manual!! - Jo
AnswerID: 156163

Follow Up By: conman - Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 23:31

Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 23:31
But i just wanted to go home :)
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Follow Up By: johannagoanna - Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 23:39

Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 23:39
I am not being rude, but you did say it was the first time you had used your winch. Most people buy winches and don't realise that you can't just hook them us, run it until you have pull yourself/others and not worry about much else. The manual will tell you how long you can run the winch, and how long you need to rest it before running it again. This is actually only a very short time! This is how most winches get cooked! You also need to keep the revs up on the car at the same time, so that you don't flatten the battery.

It is always wise to read the manual, go out in the bush and have a play close to home, so you know what to do, before you need to use it for real! That way you will know how to use it properly and will be able to get home quicker!

hope this helps - Jo
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Follow Up By: conman - Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 23:44

Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 23:44
Fair enough Jo, I realise you only use short bursts, have seen it done before. But when i change my batteries i'll go back to the same spot and try again, because if what i experienced was normal a hand wich would be quicker (maybe).
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FollowupID: 410198

Follow Up By: johannagoanna - Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 23:53

Monday, Feb 20, 2006 at 23:53
LOL - yes, but a hell of a lot harder work! Given the choice I still would use an electric winch over a hand winch anyday! Chuck the meter on your batteries and see what they are upto, under load! - Jo
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FollowupID: 410202

Follow Up By: Member - Tony G (ACT) - Tuesday, Feb 21, 2006 at 07:07

Tuesday, Feb 21, 2006 at 07:07
I think somewhere above you wanted to know if the 9000lb winch would pull the vehicle up a steep slope.

A lot of varies here, vehicle load, slope surface etc etc. Short answer yes, but take into acount the vehicle weight can almost double with rolling resistance, a snatch block will help a lot. Take a lot longer but ease the strain on the battries and winch
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FollowupID: 410224

Reply By: traveller2 - Tuesday, Feb 21, 2006 at 08:11

Tuesday, Feb 21, 2006 at 08:11
The 'use' time should be strictly adhered to because modern vehicles with electronic voltage regualtors and high output alternators will once the battery is 'flat' attempt to drive the winch with the alternator.
The alternator cannot sustain full output (or greater) for very long before suffering meltdown.
Most winches especially low mounts with poor airflow around the motor will only provide a couple of minutes winching before they are too hot to function.
Some winches fitted with thermal overload switches will still burn out so the thermal switch cannot be relied upon.
Also winches need regular servicing especially electrical connections should be removed, cleaned and replaced regularly.
AnswerID: 156190

Reply By: desert - Tuesday, Feb 21, 2006 at 08:41

Tuesday, Feb 21, 2006 at 08:41
It's been my experience that No, that form of recovery is asking too much from an electric winch. In all but the most simplest, flat ground pull, always use a block or perhaps two blocks. You will have 9000lb pull only on the bare drum. By the time the first layer has wound on, you are back to about 8200lb, by the third layer it's more like 7000lb and it gets worst. This is also for a winch and battery in 100% tip top condition, and even so you have about 3 minutes of winch pull before the battery cannot maintain current. A 35 degree slope is very steep, a gradient where you should allow the full weight of the vehicle in your mental calculations, in this case 2 tonne. Plus the resistance due to the surface and if it's mud then add another 1 tonne. If you have let the tyres down for traction, this extra load equates to about another half tonne. Add all that up, and 20% for contingencies and you will see you really had a load of around 4000tonne (8800lb) or virtually right on your THEORETICAL limit. But due to the less-than=perfect electrical system, you are pushing the boundarys. I think you found that out anyhow.
AnswerID: 156195

Reply By: Gu_Patrol - Tuesday, Feb 21, 2006 at 08:53

Tuesday, Feb 21, 2006 at 08:53
Once your batteries get below 12volts your winch doesn't work aswell, the solinods need the full 12 volts or above otherwise you start cooking the winch motor, like the others have said, short bursts of winching is best .
I think the winch could use upto 300 amps while winching therefor your 70 amp hour battery won't last long, After the first 2 metres of winching your battery has only 11.9 volts left unless you use an optima battery or simalar.
I reckon the old hydraulic winches are the only wat to go
AnswerID: 156199

Reply By: Wizard1 - Tuesday, Feb 21, 2006 at 11:04

Tuesday, Feb 21, 2006 at 11:04
That's why I bought a Tirfor. Batteries don't run out, just my energy which recovers over time. More importantly the car will still start as the battery isn't flat....

I've pulled out a Landrover 110 stuck up to its axles in mud with a Tirfor. Great workout!

AnswerID: 156217

Follow Up By: Max - Sydney - Tuesday, Feb 21, 2006 at 12:52

Tuesday, Feb 21, 2006 at 12:52
They say people who carry tirfors are super careful not to get stuck, as its so hard to get out with them. he-he-he
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FollowupID: 410295

Reply By: Member - Collyn R (WA) - Tuesday, Feb 21, 2006 at 12:14

Tuesday, Feb 21, 2006 at 12:14
Conman
Brief answer is yes - if battery, cabling etc is adequate. But you may need to let it cool off a few times. Probable available pull is 3000 kg at mid-drum and 2500 kg max. Required pull (if not also bogged) about 1000 - 1250 kg.

You can also use a snatch block to double the available pull. But energy consumed remains about the same (actually a bit more through friction losses). Current is halved, time is doubled.
Trust this helps
Collyn Rivers

AnswerID: 156229

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