05 diesel lux owners - caught 3.0 GU syndrome!

Submitted: Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 10:42
ThreadID: 31238 Views:2164 Replies:8 FollowUps:18
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Just been advised that a second of our company 2005 turbo diesel Hiluxes has blown an engine. This is the second one in two weeks. The first had 13,000kms on it and this one has done 16,000 kms. Still waiting on the verdict and will advise outcome.


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The 10/05 3.0td lux at my second job has just spat the motor recently.
Apparently there was no warning during driving, just boooooosht and lots of white smoke comming from exhaust. Toyota has described the event as "a catastrophic failure of piston skirt area leading to significant and non reparable cylinder damage". It has done 17,700 and was serviced every 5k by Toyota as per lease arrangements. A replacemnt motor is on its way under warranty, but has been off the road now for 11 business days.

The 3l td Navara is slightly less comfy 3 months older has 8k more on the engine but is going. Triton is similar to Navara, and the MBZ Vito (we call it the bang bus from one guys NYE adventures) has just hit 900,800 in 5 years - serviced every 20,000 kms, its a 2l CRDi turbo motor. No oil change in between standard service intervals.
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Reply By: Notso - Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 12:04

Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 12:04
OOOPs, Can't see any comments from the yota phytes yet. AH well good to know it's not only Nissans EH.
AnswerID: 157499

Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (Widgiemooltha) - Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 20:56

Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 20:56
Drove a GQ which had its 4.2 diesal motor replaced at 20,000k (at least thats what the service sticker said) must be a pretty unreliable motor huh?
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FollowupID: 411912

Reply By: Member - Stephen M (NSW) - Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 12:56

Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 12:56
Hi ther Truckster, I think I'l keep the old 2.8 for a while yet, was just talking to the wife last night on maybe upgrading and get something with a bit more grunt, actually make that a bleep load more grunt and some added comfort, ah well looks like I'l be chugging around in the old girl a bit longer than I thought, and I thought it was just those 3L in the nissans, I'd better put my head back in the sand for now till we no what the real problem is eh. LOL. Regards Steve M
AnswerID: 157512

Reply By: jorgejhandal - Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 14:52

Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 14:52
its not the first, here in honduras the new hilux has had many problems apart of engine failure, (4 I know of) the headlights and tailights fall off, the interior gets loose after a week of use, squeaks like and old car.
what I think is that new cars are not made as old doesnt matter what brand it is, my patrol blew a piston, ( had it 38 days in service by nissan , hopefully Ill get it this week)
toyotas have the same problems, Ill better buy a used td42 patrol or a 2.8 hilux
AnswerID: 157540

Follow Up By: Member - Collyn R (WA) - Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 16:11

Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 16:11
Also reports of dual cab rear of cab rubbing on tray - due to bendy chassis.
Collyn
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Follow Up By: Member - John (Vic) - Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 16:14

Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 16:14
Collyn thats why they say they are "Unbreakable" they bend instead. LOL.
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Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 16:16

Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 16:16
Its a sad indication of the direction "TOUGH" offroad vehicles are heading.

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Follow Up By: Member - Collyn R (WA) - Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 17:04

Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 17:04
Truckster
Indeed! I think I bought my 2005 Nissan patrol (4.2 of course) just in time. What else is left?
Collyn
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Follow Up By: Mad Dog (Australia) - Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 19:55

Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 19:55
Ha! and they reckon the chassis is stronger..pigs butt, you only have to look at these rigs to know they aren't built to go off road, what a flippin joke.
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Reply By: Gerhardp1 - Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 18:26

Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 18:26
I reckon the problem is the size - 3.0 litre 4 cyl diesel is just plain wrong.

Any other size seems to be OK :)
AnswerID: 157587

Follow Up By: Axle - Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 19:08

Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 19:08
I reckon the problem is high reving , high compression electronic controlled 4cyl diesels is just plain wrong.
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Follow Up By: Gerhardp1 - Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 19:36

Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 19:36
Can't agree - see this extract from the opening post

MBZ Vito (we call it the bang bus from one guys NYE adventures) has just hit 900,800 in 5 years - serviced every 20,000 kms, its a 2l CRDi turbo motor. No oil change in between standard service intervals.

Maybe it's just the Japs that can't build a high revving diesel that's reliable?

However, I was taking the p!ss :)
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Follow Up By: Ron173 - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 11:27

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 11:27
"3.0 litre 4 cyl diesel is just plain wrong."

and this would be based on what theory???????

rgds

A happy trouble free 130,000km 3.2ltr 4 cyl diesel owner
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Follow Up By: Gerhardp1 - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 11:33

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 11:33
Try reading with open eyes not closed mind.

This was my last sentence -

However, I was taking the p!ss :)
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Follow Up By: Gerhardp1 - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 11:35

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 11:35
I also said 3.0 litre, if I read your post correctly yours is 3.2.

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Follow Up By: Ron173 - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 15:13

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 15:13
What can I say,
I've been found to be fraudulent in my quote by the forum police.

and also I understand Collyn R, and his actions today.
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Reply By: Member - Collyn R (WA) - Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 20:51

Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 20:51
How on earth can a 4WD that has 80 mm less ground clearance than its predecessor be anything but 80 mm less capable off road!

I know you can raise them, but if Toyota had the old market in mind - why did they make it so much lower? Toyota say it is a 'gobal concept' But we don't have globally equal driving conditions let alone needs. Mine is to go through mud (into Broome) that's often (like today) more than 80 mm deep.

I'm a woman, and have and really do use two dual-cab proper diesel-engined Hiluxes. I admit I lusted after the new one. Then I saw the thing.

It's like a b-y tin dachshund.

Proper 4WD huh! More like a gonna-go-outback dream for romantic hairdressers! I don't know how any of you real guys can even be seen in one!

I'm so grateful that my latest Hiluxes is one of the last few of the previous 3.0 litre TD Hiluxes sold here. I love it!

Re the smaller engine Nissan Patrol, my husband thinks the engine is originally from a Renault van or car.
Maarit Rivers
AnswerID: 157620

Follow Up By: Steve M - Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 22:37

Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 22:37
Glad to see some people agree with the shocking look of the new hilux. I have just replaced my ever-reliable '91 2.8 hilux but could not bring myself to drive the new one cos its soooo UGLY

Steve
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen M (NSW) - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 21:14

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 21:14
Hi ther steve where are you located at. Regards Steve M
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Follow Up By: Steve M - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 10:53

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 10:53
I'm in perth WA

Steve
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Reply By: Geoff M (Newcastle, NSW) - Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 21:18

Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 21:18
I was checking one of these Hiluxes out at the lights today.
It suddenly dawned on me, if Toyota had fitted car doors instead of barn doors the bloody things would have 300mm more ground clearance!!

Geoff.
Geoff,
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AnswerID: 157628

Reply By: scottcamp - Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 21:43

Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 21:43
Hi All,
Do not wan't to dilute the conversation but I would like to point out a few things. You might remember I ran a survey on the Nissan 3.0 Engine a while back, well I am still getting in lots of results. There are now a lot of high mileage 3.0 Td running around some well over the 300,000 mark. There was a problem with the early model and it has nothing to do with small engine etc. There are tons of small engines pulling big cars around which reach massive mileages. There was a design fault in the early engine, this as far as I can see is now fixed. So what has this got to do with the Toyota, simple, as these engines get more hi-tech then the scope for error becomes higher? There are very few new models that come out which are completely faultless, all new products run the risk of design faults. Right or wrong these big firms are under pressure to get the product from the drawing table to the road, not only for the lowest cost but the shortest time. So what I am saying if the Toyota has a problem then Toyota will fix it, right or wrong that is just the way they work now. Yes it should have been picked up at testing, but get real, it all about money now. It is how Toyota deals with the problem that will determine how their reputation survives. This was Nissans problem, if they done what they did in Europe and replaced all early 3.0Td this problem would have been forgotten about. As for the 3.0 patrol, this will be one of the last true 4x4 vehicles left, and if rumours are true this will end soon. Lets just hope I am right that Nissan did have a design fault and it is now fixed, who knows you just might find yourself looking for one in the future as there will be very little choice of real 4x4's. Just look under a patrol and looked under the new generation 4x4, it’s a joke really.

PS I will get round to summarising the survey, but there is just so much info I need to find a few spare days.
AnswerID: 157647

Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 00:22

Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 00:22
>>> So what I am saying if the Toyota has a problem then Toyota will fix it
Like Nissan are apparently doing with 3.0 owners telling them bad luck? even though its so well documented its should be called WholeyPistonGate.
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>>> As for the 3.0 patrol, this will be one of the last true 4x4 vehicles left...
hahahahahahaahhahahahahahaa, oh you mean left in the workshop. the 4.2 is still going strong as is the 4.8 petrol...
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Reply By: Steve M - Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 21:51

Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 21:51
The moral of the story... do not buy the first of a new model, buy the last when the bugs are fixed.

Steve
AnswerID: 157653

Follow Up By: scottcamp - Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 22:14

Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 at 22:14
Hi Steve,
Bingo, if you buy a brand new model you always run the risk of design problems. Luckily these are usually minor, remember minor design faults can have drastic consequences for an engine. As with the patrol 3.0, I deliberately avoided the early models and waited until the 2005 model to buy my car as a keeper. By this time all the problems would have been ironed out, it is always good policy not to buy a car in its first year if it is a dramatic change from the previous car.
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FollowupID: 411951

Follow Up By: Member - Collyn R (WA) - Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 11:15

Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 11:15
SteveM/scottcamp

You are both so right!

When a new car is designed, all prototypes are essentially hand-built. The vehicles bought by customers however are manufactured using automated production processes and assembled by a different and automated process.

Thus it is not simply the vehicle that is different but also the production process.

My experience as a research engineer with GM was that some problems only show up once the production line is running - and may in some cases be introduced by that line. Many such faults do not show up until months after manufacturer and may take further months to fix.

The following is a minor but actual example.

After two years or so production, one Vauxhall car had severe chrome plating problems - where the final chrome coating was lifting almost in one piece from the ultra-thin prior flash coating. This problem affected virtually the entire production of just this one model - but not of others assembled on the same plating production line (which had not been changed in any way for the new model). It also affected only the front bumper - not the back.

I was directly responsible for tracing this problem. The cause was simply that the new front bumper was about 1.5 kg heavier than previously, but lighter than other bumpers also on the line.

This change in weight was the cause.

As this bumper was lowered automatically into the plating vat, it unfortunately bounced about a millimetre before it settled onto the electrified track that carried the plating current. (It was a harmonic resonance effect and that bumper was the exact weight needed to iniate the bounce.)

This resulted in an initial macroscopically thin plating layer(deposited in less than a millisecond) followed by the main but poorly adherering main plating layer. After a time these two layers separated.

There are many such examples - and one of the main functions of the research lab back then at least was to sort out these often esoteric faults.

In short - the initial production vehicles may be part of the development process! It's great that some people buy them, but you won't find me lining up for one.
Collyn Rivers
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