Diesel Fuel Conditioner

Submitted: Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 19:25
ThreadID: 31340 Views:11504 Replies:14 FollowUps:10
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In final planning phase for our 16 week trip to all parts North. Picked up some basic spares (hoses, filters, belts) and was thinking about 'what if I get some contaminated fuel on the trip'.

The Toyota guy says' we have this great conditioner that disperses water and kills algae in fuel. It's great stuff and I can give you a 500 ml bottle for $110. I say 'you must be kidding' and he quietly responds 'If you drop around to the truck spares place around the corner, they have it much cheaper'.

So I drop around the corner and they have Chemtech Diesel Power; 50ml for $8.30, 500ml for about $15 etc up to 5 litre for just over $100 I think.

I'm told that if you don't want to use it all the time, you can generally get away with doseing the tank at the first sign of suspected fuel trouble. Anyone with any experience using this stuff like this? I know, a litre will cost about $30 and last a year if I use it all the time, but I was wondering about using it 'as required' instead to disperse water or kill algae if I think I might have some bad fuel.
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Reply By: Member - Paul P (Bris) - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 20:01

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 20:01
Greetings

I use a fuel conditioner occassionally ( 3-4 tanks) on my diesel. In a recent 20,000k trip I had some rubbish in the filter at a normal change interval (fuel filter). Did not use a conditioner the whole trip.

My suggestion would be carry a spare filter and halve the filter change period ( fuel) whilst on your trip. If you see rubbish at a filter change put conditioner in at the next fill. ( With a view to killing any remaining unfiltered nasties)

Regards

Paul
AnswerID: 158152

Reply By: guzzi - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 20:06

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 20:06
Norm,
dont you just love toyotas priceing policys, seems theyve learned well off holden/isuzu :((
You will always get some water in fuel, condensation in the inground tank, condensation in your tank etc.
The algea grows in the water that settles in the bottom of the tank not in the fuel itself.
At 30 bucks a liter, which from memory treats a 1000 liters, prevention is better than cure IMO, it also should keep your injectors cleaner and compensate for low sulfur fuel which doesnt lubricate your fuel pump as well as the older less green stuff.
Also add a couple of fuel filters in your spares kit, just in case.
I use the flash lube additive and have had no problems over the last 4 years, Ive yet to try the chem tech.
AnswerID: 158156

Reply By: Pete-3139 - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 20:14

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 20:14
Norm,

I'm no expert on this stuff, but $30 of additive (along with the cost of a filter if necessary) vs possibility of engine troubles due to water, etc. I think for peace of mind the cost is worth it. You'll only kick yourself if you don't and something happens.

Anyway that's my two cents.

Cheers,

Pete
AnswerID: 158161

Reply By: Member - Andrew W (SA) - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 20:29

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 20:29
It is worth reading the details of how they work - look at the manufacturer's instructions about it.

Some fuel conditioners are alcohol based and thus attack the seals and flex rings in pumps, reduce the life of injectors through promoting early ignition, and reduce lubrication.

Some are petroleum distillate based and reduce the BTU (lower power).

Some are concentrate ether based and really focused on anti-gel qualities.

Unless you know you need to disperse water (the latter is the only solution for this short of cleaning your tank) and that, more than your fuel filter can handle, it seems there are as many drawbacks from using this stuff as benefits.

I have looked into the issue after picking up a litre or so of water in my tanks from the Queensland Fuels Group truckstop at Dalby in January. Had to pump the fuel filter about 6 times, but after about 10,000ks my mechanic says there is little sign of any water problem and everything is running smoothly again.

Ciao for now
Andrew.

AnswerID: 158165

Follow Up By: Member - Norm C (QLD) - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 20:50

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 20:50
The only listed ingredient is 880g/L Butoxyethanol.
The claim is that it cleans injectors and fuel lines, reduces diesel smoke, removes gums and varnish, decarbonises combustion chamber and prolongs filter life. Plus an added biocide kills and prevents algae in fuel lines and tanks. Also claims to improve fuel economy and boost engine performance. Not bad for $30 odd per 4,000 litres.
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Reply By: glenno(qld) - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 20:42

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 20:42
Diesel engines are made to run on 100 % diesel . Goodbye .
AnswerID: 158168

Follow Up By: Member - Norm C (QLD) - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 20:53

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 20:53
Good glenno, but where do you buy it? I doubt you will get 100% diesel (ie no contamination of any sort) very often, if ever. Even more true in more isolated areas.
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Follow Up By: Peter - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 16:03

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 16:03
Therefore I take it you won't be using bio diesel when it becomes available?
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Follow Up By: foxtel - Saturday, Mar 04, 2006 at 21:19

Saturday, Mar 04, 2006 at 21:19
Crikey Glenno, you would have to buy direct from the refineries in 44's
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Follow Up By: Geoff M (Newcastle, NSW) - Saturday, Mar 04, 2006 at 22:19

Saturday, Mar 04, 2006 at 22:19
Old Mr Diesel himself may beg to differ.
His original plan was I believe vegetable oil and in particular peanut oil.

Geoff.
Geoff,
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Reply By: Keith_A (Qld) - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 20:53

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 20:53
Since the introduction of low sulpher diesel, I have looked into this also.
There seems to be 2 main differences between the Chemtech product and Flashlube.
1. Chemtech state they contain a biocide to kill agae. Flashlube don't.
2. Chemtech state they burn the moisture. Flashlube separate it.

The chemtech lable states ' disperses and absorbes moisture in the fuel allowing it to be harmlessly burnt off.' end quote.

I asked Flashlube how their product worked - ' contains an additive that separates the water from diesel fuel, it should then be drained off each morning, removing water from the system. Water & heat are the two products that allow algae to grow, by removing the water algae is unable to grow.' end quote.

Other than that, both products claim similar benefits.
Not being a chemical engineer, I have to rely on the printed info and emails.
So - I would rather save my filter some work and burn the moisture off - hence Chemtech gets my vote.
Where moisture is concerned in a diesel, I would rather have both the filter and an additive working for me. It is cheap extra protection.
regards..................Keith
AnswerID: 158173

Follow Up By: Ron173 - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 10:11

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 10:11
I used to use chemtec, and now use flashlube, who incidentally won the award for best chemical additive 2005, with their diesel conditioner.

Guess its personal preference, but I never have to drain my tank, and apart from just running quieter I get marginally better fuel economy with it.

I would say that with todays crap fuel, dodgy storage, etc. for the small price, its worth running an additive all the time.

Also, (although no use on a trip),..... at home, buy your regular fuel from the newer stations, newer tanks, less likely to have probs.

I do 25000km a year, use flash lube all time, change fuel filter once a year, never had problems or even yukky filter, which it was when I bought it from its first previous owner. 3.2 Navara.

Ron
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Reply By: Member - Roachie (SA) - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 20:59

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 20:59
a href="http://domain.com/path">link textlink text</a
AnswerID: 158174

Follow Up By: Member - Roachie (SA) - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 21:01

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 21:01
I swear I'll never get the hang of this new fangled technology (ie: posting bloody links!!!!!)

Anyway...have a look at

www.morison.com.au

Cheers

Roachie
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FollowupID: 412558

Reply By: Peter - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 21:43

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 21:43
Norm C
I've been using Chemtech for over 8 years now. First in my Defender and now in my Patrol. I don't know whether is does any good, but it certainly doesn't appear to do any harm either. I've never had a fuel problem in over 200,000km, and that includes filling up in some dodgy areas. 1 bottle does me about 12-15 months, and that's putting in the correct amount at each fill up. I'm happy to pay the bit extra (about $27 a litre from Supercheap).
AnswerID: 158192

Follow Up By: Smitty - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 08:51

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 08:51
Peter - along with being able to purchase 'chemtech' from supercheap, is there anywhere else that you know it is stocked??

Thanks
Jake
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FollowupID: 412674

Follow Up By: Ron173 - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 10:52

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 10:52
Smitty,

you will get chemtech and others in most major motoring stores, I think big w do it also, shouldnt be hard to find in a major town.

Ron
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FollowupID: 412704

Follow Up By: Peter - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 16:06

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 16:06
Yep, agree with Ron. I buy if from Supercheap because I get discount, but it is readily available at places like Repco. KMart etc. Even quite a few service stations stock it, but you tend to pay a bit more. Even if you have to purchase a couple of bottles from the city before heading out it still isn't that expensive. My bottles usually last at least 12 months and don't seem to degrade at all
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FollowupID: 412792

Reply By: Member - Norm C (QLD) - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 22:04

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 22:04
Thanks guys. I think I'll use it on a regular basis for our upcoming 16 week trip where we expect to do about 20,000 KM including some pretty remote places. Seems a pretty cheap insurance policy. I'll reassess on our return.
Thanks
Norm C
AnswerID: 158198

Reply By: Brett_B - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 22:08

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 22:08
Hi Norm

I use the Chemtech in my D4D, one small dose (25ml I think ?) every 3-4 tanks, I believe its ok.

I have had no problems or water in the trap.

I have the 1Lt bottle, it will last me a long time.....

Brett

AnswerID: 158202

Reply By: rickwagupatrol - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 23:06

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 23:06
Norm, i use the Chemtech in my truck, never had a problem.........well except one.

every time i fuel up i put in a thousand litres....lololol

take it with you mate , its good cheap insurance against crappy fuel.

rick.
AnswerID: 158229

Reply By: Willem - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 12:22

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 12:22
I use 50mm of Flash Lube with every tankfull. The engine runs very sweetly and I have not had water problems to date. Changed the filter after 25,000km and it was still quite servicable. Flash Lube is $15 litre here in the bush.
AnswerID: 158329

Reply By: 100TD - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 16:43

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 16:43
funny u say $110 for 500ml because i bought a new can of toyota conditioner last week and they tried to charge me $77 so my reply was how about $16.50 like it says on the label under the cans?bit of ummmming and arrrrhing later i walk out with conditioner for $16.50 cheers Paul
AnswerID: 158372

Reply By: Geoff M (Newcastle, NSW) - Saturday, Mar 04, 2006 at 22:22

Saturday, Mar 04, 2006 at 22:22
Cack, the Toyota stuff has had a bloody good price rise!
Last time I bought it, within the last 12 months I paid less than $20.00 for the 500ml tin!

Geoff.
Geoff,
Landcruiser HDJ78,
Grey hair is hereditary, you get it from children. Baldness is caused by watching the Wallabies.

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AnswerID: 158642

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