100 amp fuse in 60 amp holder

Submitted: Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 23:28
ThreadID: 31358 Views:5381 Replies:6 FollowUps:7
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Bought a in-line maxi blade holder today for dual battery setup with a 100 amp fuse. Just noticed holder is rated at 60 amp. Does that mean the cable will melt before the fuse.
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Reply By: drivesafe - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 23:32

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 23:32
No, it’s more like the holder will melt so not a real good idea.

Cheers
AnswerID: 158237

Reply By: Mad Dog (Australia) - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 23:32

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 23:32
Doesn't sound like a good match to me, the fuse holder will melt before the fuse blows, don't know about the cable as you didn't specify what you're using.
AnswerID: 158238

Follow Up By: Mad Dog (Australia) - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 23:35

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 23:35
and fuse holders do melt but I'm interested in just what you'll be doing with this 60 amps or 100 for that matter.
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FollowupID: 412619

Follow Up By: Mad Dog (Australia) - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 23:43

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 23:43
ok sorry I missed it, dual battery setup. You're very unlikely to get those amount of amps flowing so stick a 40 amp fuse in and you'll be safe.
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FollowupID: 412622

Follow Up By: Mainey (WA) - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 00:54

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 00:54
Mad Dog
I would bet my house you can get in excess of 40 Amps flowing between two batteries....

That's why every electronic battery isolator I'm aware of is rated over 100 amps.
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FollowupID: 412640

Follow Up By: Mad Dog (Australia) - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 08:37

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 08:37
I have no doubt you could but most installations wouldn't acheive that, mine doesn't with 35mm² cable with 50% discharged aux an a deep cycle. No matter, if the fuse pops put a bigger one in...no big deal, no grey hairs.
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FollowupID: 412666

Reply By: PK Eildon (VIC) - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 23:45

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 23:45
Thanks guys. Don't think I will be using it. The answers to the other questions are:

100 amp fuse on each of the + terminals recommended for Redarc when winching off both batteries, otherwise 50 amp.

The inline fuse is welded in the middle of a piece of red terminal cable. I assume the cable is rated at 60 amp.

The whole thing surprises me a bit as I went into a auto elec and asked him for a 100 amp in-line fuse and this is what he handed me. It wasn't until I got home and read the label I realised the fuse outrated the holder.

Thought there may have been a different rating system for fuses and cable.
AnswerID: 158242

Follow Up By: Kiwi Kia - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 06:46

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 06:46
No real problem at all if the fuse is there in case of a short circuit. If your 'normal' operating load is over 60 amps then you are going to have a problem.

The cable rating takes into account the operating temperature and several other factors and will happily carry well in excess of 60 amps for some time till the temperature rise starts to melt the insulation and may cause a fire.

With a large MAIN fuse the instant full load current when you are starting or winching can be carried without blowing the main fuse and your individual circuit fuses should protect you from the normal operating constant current.
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FollowupID: 412651

Follow Up By: Leroy - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 09:09

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 09:09
If you are planning on winching, I wouldn't install a fuse. A winch under load will draw more than 100amps! Your starter motor in your car generally doesn't have a fuse as it's not practical hence not practical for a winch either. I'd install a fuse on the second battery for your aux outlets only if you feel the need but even I haven't done that but thenn the cable I use has thick insulation and is inside split tube. The narva cct breaker is waiting for it's chance to be installed......one day :-)

Leroy

PS I use a Redarc and a winch.
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FollowupID: 412678

Reply By: Derek from Affordable Batteries & Radiators - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 08:30

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 08:30
If you plan on winching or jump starting off this circuit you can't use a fuse.

The fuse will blow and if you are in the sticks you will have to bodge the wiring to get the thing to work again.
AnswerID: 158285

Reply By: PK Eildon (VIC) - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 10:51

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 10:51
Sounds like my best option may be "no fuses" and battery connectors on neg posts with those green disconnection knobs in case things look too hot under bonnet.
AnswerID: 158313

Follow Up By: Mike DiD - Saturday, Mar 04, 2006 at 12:17

Saturday, Mar 04, 2006 at 12:17
If you are going to be using a big winch that will draw hundreds of amps, I would run a heavy cable between the two batteries that can take the winching current. In the middle of this cable put one of those battery isolating switches with the green knob. Only close this switch when winching.

Run a separate wire (100amp) between the battery positives that runs via the Battery Isolator and is fused.

Mike
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FollowupID: 412978

Reply By: gen3rules - Saturday, Mar 04, 2006 at 07:33

Saturday, Mar 04, 2006 at 07:33
If you are so keen to use a fuse of that size try a caterpillar type manual reset circuit breaker these come in a large range and in my opinion are far superior to fuses and auto reset circuit breakers designed for automotive use. If there is no cat agent close by kenworth dealers also can source them.
AnswerID: 158464

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