In the white corner weighing 3.5t

Submitted: Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 13:48
ThreadID: 31372 Views:2277 Replies:13 FollowUps:9
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Used my charm and good looks and just had the Troopie weight for free. The beautiful young lady at the weight bridge let me drive onto the scales at the local weight bridge and then came out and told me the weight of the Troopie.

3.5 tonne.

The vehicle had all the camping gear from the Vic High Country last week. Swag, cloths and a few tarps, and of course I was in the vehicle as well. What I would have to be add for a trip would be 240lt of diesel, I only have 30 lt in one tank when it was checked. There was only 30lt of water, another 90lt can be added into the tanks, a bit of food and of course 1 or 2 beers.

I now know that when I head off to the big trips that I would be close to the 4tonne mark

Wayne.
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Reply By: Member - Tony G (ACT) - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 13:57

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 13:57
I think we all need to weigh our vehicles if just to open our eyes to what we are asking of a 4WD when we go bush or a long trip.

4t, thats a heck of a lot aye Wayne.
AnswerID: 158348

Reply By: Willem - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 14:07

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 14:07
Yeah I weighed the GQ a few weeks back at 2.72 ton with full fuel load of 95lts
Add two adults and tucker and clothes and two extra spares ...another 320kg and she weighs in at 3040 which 240kgs over the 2.8 ton GVM

Then the trailer goes on the back with the extra 240lts fuel and camping gear weighing in at 750kg all up.

Hit a head wind and you can see the fuel gauge move...lol
AnswerID: 158349

Reply By: Browser - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 14:32

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 14:32
Hi Wayne,

AnswerID: 158355

Follow Up By: Browser - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 14:36

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 14:36
Try Again!!!!

Hi Wayne,

Interesting, and I think many 4WDers would be surprised what their vehicles actually way when they are fully loaded for a trip out bush. Just out of curiousity I checked the Troopy Specifications and the GVM is 3200kg's.

regards,

Browser
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FollowupID: 412778

Follow Up By: Browser - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 14:37

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 14:37
Just not my day............

Way should be weigh!!!!!
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FollowupID: 412779

Follow Up By: Rob from Cairns Offroad Training & Tours - Saturday, Mar 04, 2006 at 11:31

Saturday, Mar 04, 2006 at 11:31
What will your insurance co. say if you have an accident and your vehicle is over its GVM. ??? Cheers Rob
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FollowupID: 412966

Reply By: Michael B - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 14:53

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 14:53
Hi Wayne,

Should live in the country.....can get my Troopie weighed any day, or every day if wanted....and for nuffin.. lol

Regards
Michael B (SA)
AnswerID: 158357

Follow Up By: Michael B - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 14:54

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 14:54
......Oh and I haven't got any good looks or charm either......LOL LOL

Michael B
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FollowupID: 412783

Reply By: flappa - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 15:04

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 15:04
So we are all driving illegal vehicles . . .

No wonder scruby loves us
AnswerID: 158358

Follow Up By: Member - Beatit (QLD) - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 16:57

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 16:57
But Scruby can't legally drive in Queensland because since 1/3/2006 he has to have a medical certificate to state that his medical condition is not a driving impedement. It is impossible to pi$$ off so much of the driving community and not be having a medical problem I presume he is discussing his medical certificate as we chat - wouldn't want him breaking the law now would we.

Kind regards
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FollowupID: 412802

Reply By: stevesub - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 15:06

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 15:06
Got our Troopy weighed a couple of years ago. 78 series pop-top camper ready for the bush, 5 days food, 45l water, 180 diesel, 2 people, dual batteries and all gear including spares and recovery gear - 2.9 ton.

Stevesub
AnswerID: 158359

Reply By: Member No 1- Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 17:13

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 17:13
roachies gotta take this out going by what I read on here
AnswerID: 158375

Follow Up By: Member - Roachie (SA) - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 18:19

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 18:19
I've been meaning to do a check of my all up weight when heading out on a trip Nudie; just haven't plucked up the courage to do so yet. The only time I weighed it was a couple of years ago at a wheat receivable place. It tipped at 3020 and I wasn't packed up or fuelled up to head off anywhere!!!
Cheers
Roachie
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FollowupID: 412814

Reply By: Peter 2 - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 18:00

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 18:00
It is easy to get a troopy to weigh around the 4 tonne mark, when we did the CSR in 92 our old 2h powered 75 series weighed over the 4t when we left Halls Crk
Two adults, 3 kids, food for a month, 250 litres diesel, 120l water, camping gear, clothes etc.
We then flog it over sand dunes, it's a bloody wonder they never break. Must accelerate the wear though.
Part of the reason I bought the Humvee weighs 3t as it is and has a GVM of 4.2t and is rated for continuous duty at full GVM.
Peter
1996 Oka Motorhome

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AnswerID: 158382

Reply By: Member - Norm C (QLD) - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 19:02

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 19:02
Our local tip has a weigh bridge and they are very helpful. I recently dropped in fully loaded with the CT in tow. Drove over the bridge a few times.
vehicle and CT
vehicle only
vehicle with CT, but with trailer wheels off bridge (ie vehicle and ball weight on bridge)
trailer wheels only on bridge (ie vehicle and ball weight off bridge).

He wrote it all down for my; no charge.

From that I can calculate any number of different weights.

What surprised me is the CT weight. When fully loaded with 200Lt water, 80Lt fuel, 2 AGM batteries, gennie, full kitchen, etc etc, it weighs just on 1,500KG. I had 'estimated' at least 150KG less than that.

As others have said, it really is worth the effort to know your vehicle, CT and ball weight.
AnswerID: 158388

Reply By: desert - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 21:19

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 21:19
Hmmmm. Interesting exercise. Now that you all know what the vehicles actually weigh, what are you going to do next???
AnswerID: 158401

Follow Up By: Wayne (NSW) - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 21:24

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 21:24
Well on Sunday I am going to Stockton Beach and then later in the year I will load it up even more for a 5 month trip around Australia.

Wayne
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FollowupID: 412838

Reply By: Member - greg S (QLD) - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 22:00

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 22:00
Had a 4.2L patrol ute when working for a very large mining, excavation machinery company and it weighed in at around 3.2 T. Had all my tools on board + myself and a bit of diesel, but it had no extra's, of which we used to carry all the time. Don't think I would like to know what it weighed.

Greg S
AnswerID: 158411

Follow Up By: Sarg - Saturday, Mar 04, 2006 at 01:17

Saturday, Mar 04, 2006 at 01:17
Seeing that the ''other'' company that makes big yellow trucks & tractors use Fords & Landcruisers, I guess that I worked for the same Co.that you did. Add the 8x5 tandem trailer with anything from a track press to an engine etc & yes ,it is pretty scary what it would weigh all up. No wonder it took a while to wind them up & even more so to stop them.
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FollowupID: 412888

Reply By: Axle - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 23:11

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 23:11
Hi Wayne.
You know your industry, on the mechanical side of things I would be very concerned with a 9 - 10 YR old vechicle carrying that weight on corrugated roads for any lenght of time. Fatique with stub axles is something that can creep up with out warning.

Cheers Axle.
AnswerID: 158435

Follow Up By: Wayne (NSW) - Saturday, Mar 04, 2006 at 08:29

Saturday, Mar 04, 2006 at 08:29
Axel,

I suppose that is why I drive a Toyota.
The vehicle that I had before was a 80 Series and when it was sent out to stud it was 12 years old and had 500,000 on the clock. Would have weighed the same.

Once I had to change the rear bearings and was able to do it in the bush.

When it comes to those parts Toyota kept it simple with full floating axles. The Axel can be removed from the front or rear diff and the vehicle can still be driven. The bearings are the same front and back.

I think that the Troopie suits what I am doing and will last the distance.

Wayne
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FollowupID: 412907

Reply By: TroopyTracker - Saturday, Mar 04, 2006 at 09:35

Saturday, Mar 04, 2006 at 09:35
Thing is at least you could easily get your gvm uprated at your local ARB - to 3700kgs I believe. Only wagon with decent load carrying capacity really. Load a GU or 100 with fuel, people, water, bars and racks and you're illegal. You can put about 980kgs in from the factory floor with the troopy, depending on model.

I'll swap mine for Peters humvee though. Actually been watching the price of them and they seem to still want lots of money for very old ones unfortunately,
Matt

AnswerID: 158490

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