Am I going crazy?

Submitted: Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 11:16
ThreadID: 31495 Views:2200 Replies:11 FollowUps:13
This Thread has been Archived
I feel that my diesel cruiser runs better at times than others. I mean, sometimes it just seems to run better! I don't get it.

I don't think weather has anything to do with it either. After driving it home every night after 9pm last couple of weeks the weather has been stable. Furthermore, I'm using the same fuel.

The difference is very slight. Does anyone else get that impression from their vehicles?

I'm starting to think my cruiser has feelings.
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Member - Willie , Epping .Syd. - Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 11:27

Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 11:27
I have an auto TD and I have not noticed any real change in engine performance at different times . The only thing I have noticed is that sometimes the gear box seems more clunky when it changes .
In what way is it "different " ?
Willie .
AnswerID: 159062

Follow Up By: Damien - Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 11:31

Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 11:31
I think the gearbox remains the same but the engine just feels like it’s not as responsive. Again, it is very slight. I'd say it's just my imagination.
0
FollowupID: 413564

Follow Up By: Turbo Diesel - Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 13:21

Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 13:21
Could not agree with you more Damien, i have the exact thing with my diesel cruiser and the TD Lux, it is really weird sometimes the motor seems like it just wants to go and keep going, other times it feels like its in holiday mode. Love to know why, but i understand what your saying.
0
FollowupID: 413578

Follow Up By: Damien - Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 13:30

Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 13:30
Thanks Turbo Diesel. Seriously thought it was just me. It's a weird thing aint it.
0
FollowupID: 413579

Reply By: Footloose - Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 11:29

Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 11:29
Have you checked your fuel filter lately ?
AnswerID: 159063

Reply By: Nav 8 - Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 11:29

Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 11:29
Gday Damien,,,, The intrenal combustion engine will tend to run better when driven when the weather is cooler or humid eg more moisture in the air. This in turn gives a little better compression and a little more oxygen which improves combustion. Back in the 70 or 80s somone devised a water injection system that injected a small amount of water into the manifold of car engines to improve running and fuel consumption but like all fuel saveing devices was short lived.
Regards
AnswerID: 159064

Follow Up By: muzbry 3175 - Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 12:50

Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 12:50
Gday
Back in the 60 s i was fitting the water injectors to cars as an apprentice,,and we noticed that if the vehicle was not used often ,,the engine would rust up as there was no stopper on the bottle to inject nozzle. This was a good unit in those days and only worked when the vacuum was at its max,which happens to be down hill when it is not needed.
Muzbry
Great place to be Mt Blue Rag 27/12/2012

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 413572

Follow Up By: Leroy - Wednesday, Mar 08, 2006 at 15:58

Wednesday, Mar 08, 2006 at 15:58
I thought water injection was to prevent detonation as a result of running more advaced ignition timings and higher compression??

Leroy
0
FollowupID: 413899

Follow Up By: muzbry 3175 - Thursday, Mar 09, 2006 at 12:56

Thursday, Mar 09, 2006 at 12:56
Gday Leroy
As i have not been in that industry for many years,i can't talk about the newer systems.The one that i mentioned was a vacuum fed water pipe that free flowed through a small hole in the end at the intake manifold.If the water was dirty or had algie the pipe just blocked up. The kit consisted of a 2pint bottle and a clamp with 2 screws,there was a sizing drill and a piece of pvc hose with the nozzle .A hole was drilled into the intake manifold under the carbureter then the nozzle tapped in with a short sharp blow. The bottle was mounted half above and half below the nozzle height then filled with filtered water,,,then we hoped for the best.
Not very technical ,but then it was 45 odd years ago.
Thank you for your interest
Muzbry
PS advanced ignition timing was a thing of the future as was high compression on petrol engines.
Muzbry
Great place to be Mt Blue Rag 27/12/2012

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 414117

Follow Up By: wheeleybin - Sunday, Mar 12, 2006 at 12:50

Sunday, Mar 12, 2006 at 12:50
The water alcohol injection was introduced around about the 1930's and I had it installed on a 1936 ford side valve V8 in the fifties.
I think it was made or supplied by Frank Klienig.
With low fuel costs it did not last long but has been extensively used in the aviation industry to decrease manifold temperatures .
With the soaring fuel prices the idea has been redesigned and is again available for most carsand if you refer to the diesel gas link in this forum you may see my results for my current installation.
Regards
Wheeleybin
0
FollowupID: 414696

Reply By: glenno(qld) - Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 11:53

Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 11:53
After driving my troopy(naturally exasperated) up a range trying to overtake a truck LOL (I mean back to second ,up to third , back to second absolutely flat strap , revving the guts out of it ) i noticed the troopy runs much better . Troopy tacho now effortlessly goes to 2500rpm in third whereas before it was an effort to get to 2000rpm in third . I think maybe i loosened some carbon deposits or something .
AnswerID: 159067

Follow Up By: Frank_Troopy - Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 12:31

Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 12:31
My troopy is a 78 series diesel with an aftermarket turbo and it definitely runs better after a burn down a highway. Also, for quite a while afterwards there's no smoke when accelerating.

I think just about every vehicle I've owned has run better after being given a good caning. It's much easier to cane my troopy than it is to cane my Hayabusa!

Cheers Frank.

0
FollowupID: 413569

Reply By: fatz - Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 12:34

Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 12:34
As above, fuel filter, very important in a diesel. it only takes some dirty fuel to slow the flow, even if it's not due, change it and see if it makes a difference. work from there, and then you may need to look at the pump if you cant live with it!!

Mick
AnswerID: 159072

Reply By: Member - John (Vic) - Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 12:48

Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 12:48
Maybe you need to seek the advice of our resident fuel guru Mr Bill S.
He will no doubt extol the virtues of fitting one of his Flitch/flatch/snatch thingys which would cure all your problems.
VKS737 - Mobile 6352 (Selcall 6352)

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message
Classifieds: Water Tank 55 Litre

AnswerID: 159075

Follow Up By: Member - Ian W (NSW) - Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 13:36

Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 13:36
Oh no!

Don,t encourage him.

Ian
0
FollowupID: 413582

Follow Up By: Member - John (Vic) - Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 13:53

Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 13:53
Ian Encouragement is good.
I just love the replies he gets when he posts, makes my day. LOL
VKS737 - Mobile 6352 (Selcall 6352)

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message
Classifieds: Water Tank 55 Litre

0
FollowupID: 413595

Follow Up By: Member - 'Lucy' - Wednesday, Mar 08, 2006 at 21:55

Wednesday, Mar 08, 2006 at 21:55
I wish you two would stop mentioning/alluding to 'he who cannot be named' because as you have so rightly observed, the man is a totally frustrated gadget, widget , have to have one of everything manic (it is a recognized illness), who is obsessed with reporting feedback on everything and everything you didn't want to know about.
0
FollowupID: 414001

Reply By: traveller2 - Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 15:24

Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 15:24
Cool, moist weather gives more grunt due to denser air, diesel does vary in quality from tank to tank too.
NA diesels will suffer more than turboed engines at altitude too, as has been said change fuel filters regularly and keep the air filter element clean as well.
Another trick is to make sure the engine isn't sucking hot air from under the bonnet, another reason for snorkles. If the intake is under the bonnet try to get it up near a headlight where there will be outside air coming in.
Most NA diesel owners will notice when travelling that when you drop down into a cool gully on a warm day the engine pulls much better with the cooler air.
AnswerID: 159104

Reply By: Member - Ozdyssey (QLD) - Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 20:58

Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 20:58
Noticed this a lot with the Disco. The Troopy not as much but I just had the fuel filters changed and there is a marked difference.
AnswerID: 159177

Reply By: Member - Allan M (ACT) - Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 23:44

Tuesday, Mar 07, 2006 at 23:44
Damien,

I've noticed similar and it took me a while to work out that, in my case, the subtle difference has to do with the weight of the vehicle, ie. the amount of fuel I am carrying.

I have a couple of inclines on the way home from work and when the fuel tank is nearing empty the vehicle negotiates the inclines easier than when carrying an extra 90kg of fuel. It is only a subtle change, but noticable.

Regards

Allan

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 159239

Reply By: Member - Chris M (QLD) - Wednesday, Mar 08, 2006 at 15:10

Wednesday, Mar 08, 2006 at 15:10
Got my mate here, and we know what you mean. Somedays it just idles nice, revs out nicely, you can feel it pulling well. There's a definite difference. My mate has a 2H Troopy and just sometimes it runs like a dream. Other times, it seems to struggle. I have a GQ Petrol Patrol and have the same deal. Sometimes drops it's idle right down to 400 rpm and coughs and sputters. Other days, just a dream to drive. Admittedly my fuel filter needs doing.

At the end of the day we reckon that everyone who loves 4wd's know their trucks so well that they almost do have a personality. But long trips, hard runs up mountain ranges and regular use and plenty of highway use (especially for diesels) keeps them running well.
AnswerID: 159325

Reply By: Member - 'Lucy' - Wednesday, Mar 08, 2006 at 21:58

Wednesday, Mar 08, 2006 at 21:58
Try driving a JEEP and see what sort of different 'diesel engine feels' you get.

Its a constant surprise in my 05 CRD KJ Cherokee.
AnswerID: 159410

Follow Up By: Wombat - Thursday, Mar 09, 2006 at 13:58

Thursday, Mar 09, 2006 at 13:58
Good constant surprises, or bad constant surprises?
0
FollowupID: 414135

Follow Up By: Member - 'Lucy' - Thursday, Mar 09, 2006 at 18:36

Thursday, Mar 09, 2006 at 18:36
Ah! no flies on you young 'Batwom', never miss a trick.

Oh good and bad.

Just spent 3 days at the JEEP National transmission 'Doctor' in Ringwood having a new torque converter and transmission pump being fitted under warranty (28,000kms).

At this stage I fully suspect that this was the root cause of all the engine management module(4 computers) hiccups that were causing lights to suddenly appear on the dash. There are 26 lights on the dash that all make the 'brown eye' go into 'blink mode' when they come on.

I now have laminated quick ref cards to tell me what they mean and in what different combinations. (F***ing nightmare)))))))

It is now back to how it was when I first drove it out of the showroom.

Good thing (maybe) is the other day a privateer JEEP specialist was doing 'something' for me and whilst doing same discovered that the air filter (paper) was choc a block with C H I T. (Original from maunfacture)

He took the liberty of replacing it with a K&N filter and instantantly the fuel consumption dropped exponentionally . Really noticeable.

Haven't had a chance to figure out exactly how much because of the transmission/torgue converter repairs.

Will monitor from next fill up tonight.

Makes one wonder what goes on at the dealer 10,000km services. (oil change only I think for $250.

K
0
FollowupID: 414181

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)