These big antenna things you see

Submitted: Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 12:55
ThreadID: 31694 Views:2396 Replies:6 FollowUps:19
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Hi all,

Driving behind a rodeo today and on the front of the tray it had one of those really fat looking antenna things that Ive ususally seen on Bullbars before.

What are these things and what are they used for?? My guess was that it was some sort of Sat phone connect-er-up-er-ar!!LOL!!

Laura B
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Reply By: Scoey - Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 13:04

Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 13:04
I've wondered that myself Laura! I think they might be for HF radios? I'm only guessing but! I'va also seen the on spare wheel carriers!
Cheers
Scoey!
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Follow Up By: Laura B - Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 13:06

Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 13:06
is there a diff between uhf and hf is there???LOL

laura b
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Follow Up By: Scoey - Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 13:21

Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 13:21
Haha! So they say! ;-) I think HF is the REALLY long distance one??? Geez I'm gonna sound like an idiot! haha!
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Follow Up By: Mike DiD - Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 14:09

Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 14:09
Scoey - 10 points.

UHF CB works on a high frequency (477 Megahertz) which essentially travels only a straight line, so you are limited to around 50 km max.

HF works on much lower frequencies (3 to 15 Megahertz) which bounce off the Ionosphere that is several hundred kilometres high, so signals can easily reach thousands of kilometres. It is nothing unusual to talk to to the other side of the world using the same amount of power as a headlight bulb. (Amateur band, not VKS737)

These lower frequencies have a longer wavelength and the antennas need to be much longer to have any sort of efficiency.

Mike

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Follow Up By: Scoey - Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 14:22

Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 14:22
Interesting - funny how much easier it is to understand when you dumb it down good! Me gone done leared somethin' today! ;-)

Cheers
Scoey!
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Follow Up By: Mad Dog (Australia) - Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 14:49

Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 14:49
Mike, is 15 meg really considered to be the top end of the HF spectrum ? I've always understood it to be around 30 meg
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Follow Up By: Mike DiD - Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 15:37

Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 15:37
True, the definition of HF is 3 to 30 MHz, but for VKS737, the highest HF frequency used is 14.997 MKz.

Mike
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Follow Up By: Mad Dog (Australia) - Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 15:42

Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 15:42
yep ok, I've been involved with radio since I was a boy. I thought the official definition may have changed and escaped me. God only knows what some fools will try and do these days.
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Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 19:13

Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 19:13
Ray, you could have been right!! there is always someone trying to steal part of the spectrum, there is only a set amount of it and a heap of new uses for it at the moment! Michael
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Reply By: Footloose - Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 13:10

Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 13:10
You are probably referring to a HF autotune. These enable the operator to get assistance from such agencies as the RFDS and the 4wd network. Such setups can easily talk across the country, and are quite common .
AnswerID: 160220

Reply By: Nav 8 - Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 13:15

Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 13:15
G'day all
It's an auto tune antenae for HF radio and yes HF is different to UHF. Most 4WDs that have these type of anntenaes are members of the VKS 737 radio network and has base stations all over Australia. HF radio is used for long distance communication whereas UHF is generally what is known as "line of sight" or "short range" up to about 50kms max depending on the type of country you are in.
Regards
Nav
VKS737 Whiskey 9021
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Reply By: Pluto - Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 13:32

Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 13:32
Is this what you've seen?

910 automatic tuning mobile antenna

Or this

9350 Automatic Tuning Whip Antenna


Then, as the others have said. It's an autotune antenna.
AnswerID: 160223

Follow Up By: Scoey - Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 14:24

Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 14:24
That be the big hooer's I was talking about! :-D
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Follow Up By: Laura B - Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 14:37

Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 14:37
yeo that first one was the one i saw today. Seen other ones compared to the 2nd one too...maybe they were the first one just browny looking colour...

so that 910 one what does that do ; can ya use it for any mobile??

Cheers

Laura B
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Follow Up By: Mad Dog (Australia) - Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 14:53

Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 14:53
Those ones are generally used by people with too much money in their back account :)
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Follow Up By: Member - Luxoluk - Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 15:01

Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 15:01
Hi Ya Mad Dog.....I would say they are purchased by those who HAD too much money in their bank account. A new auto tune is around $1,500 I believe.....who wants to change taps all the time??
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Follow Up By: Mad Dog (Australia) - Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 15:28

Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 15:28
lol

hi Leigh, depends on how much frequency hopping one does I suppose.
In an afternoon of operating the ham bands I'd only change taps 3 or 4 times at most.

Thought you might have changed your screen name by now. Trust the Troopy is going well.

John is on his way back, at Bairnsdale now
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Follow Up By: V8troopie - Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 16:06

Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 16:06
No Laura, you can't use these for your mobile.

Short wave radio's should have antenna's that are much bigger than could be reasonably fitted to a 4WD. So they invented those automatic gadgets that fool the SW radio into thinking it is transmitting to a 'full' size antenna.

You could have antenna tuners for any kind of radio but since the higher frequenciey transmitters (UHF, mobile, etc.) have relatively small antenna's there's no point for a special external antenna tuner.

Klaus
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Reply By: V8Diesel - Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 23:53

Monday, Mar 13, 2006 at 23:53
OK radio buffs, here's a question for you all that I've alwyas meant to look up but never have.

What does HAM as in Ham Radio stand for or mean?

Thanks in advance
AnswerID: 160347

Follow Up By: V8 Troopie - Tuesday, Mar 14, 2006 at 02:08

Tuesday, Mar 14, 2006 at 02:08
Google is your friend for these kind of questions.
I just typed in "ham radio definition" and got lots of 'hits'.
Here is one of them: http://www.arrl.org/whyham.html

Klaus
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Follow Up By: V8Diesel - Tuesday, Mar 14, 2006 at 09:20

Tuesday, Mar 14, 2006 at 09:20
Thanks Klaus.

Another question that has stumped nearly everyone I've asked is what does pH stand for. No shortage of answers as to what it is or what it measures, but the actual abbreviation is another matter.

I have googled it and now know, but try asking people who don't have access to a computer.
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Follow Up By: Ken - Tuesday, Mar 14, 2006 at 16:01

Tuesday, Mar 14, 2006 at 16:01
From my childhood chemistry days I recall it stands for potential Hyrdogen. The lower the number the more 'acidity' it is, like in a battery, the higher the number the more alkaline like caustic soda.
Ken
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Follow Up By: V8Diesel - Tuesday, Mar 14, 2006 at 16:27

Tuesday, Mar 14, 2006 at 16:27
Spot on Ken. Surprising how many folks won't know that (like me before looking it up!).
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Follow Up By: Mad Dog (Australia) - Tuesday, Mar 14, 2006 at 18:09

Tuesday, Mar 14, 2006 at 18:09
V8, I''m buggered if I know what HAM stands for and I've been one since
1979 :) Lots of theorys around but who knows.
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Reply By: ExplorOz Team - David - Tuesday, Mar 14, 2006 at 14:05

Tuesday, Mar 14, 2006 at 14:05
Laura,

Have a look at this page on ExplorOz - Topic Search Communications there are several articles that explain all the uses & differences.
David (DM) & Michelle (MM)
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