AM Radio antenna.....anyone got one of these?

Submitted: Sunday, Apr 02, 2006 at 18:19
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Supposed to improve AM radio reception dramatically.

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If you have one, are they any good?

Cheers

Roachie
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Reply By: Mad Dog (Australia) - Sunday, Apr 02, 2006 at 18:24

Sunday, Apr 02, 2006 at 18:24
I don't have one but if it is built correctly I have no doubt it will work as advertised. Loop antennas aren't new, been around forever, the web is full of information about them.
AnswerID: 164425

Reply By: Kiwi Kia - Sunday, Apr 02, 2006 at 18:32

Sunday, Apr 02, 2006 at 18:32
Home made. Wrap a doz or so turns of light weight wire around a wood frame. Pop in a varaible condensor (like in an old radio or crystal set), put your transistor radio inside the loop (no conection required). Should work really well.
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Reply By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Sunday, Apr 02, 2006 at 19:01

Sunday, Apr 02, 2006 at 19:01
They weigh about 150 grams, Roachie!! I dont think you can afford the extra weight!!! :)
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Follow Up By: Brian B (QLD) - Sunday, Apr 02, 2006 at 19:17

Sunday, Apr 02, 2006 at 19:17
Michael,

I also think Roachie will be in trouble if they require any further power draw as well???
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Reply By: Member - Doug T (QLD) - Sunday, Apr 02, 2006 at 19:15

Sunday, Apr 02, 2006 at 19:15
I just had a look at that antennae , I wouldn't waste my money on it really. If you go to a store that specialises in Antennae and get a 3ft helical and mount it on the roof bar or rack with a spring as shown here. I have no trouble with it and i listen to 5AA 1395khz in Adelaide from Mt Isa up to about 8am or about 20mins after the sun has risen

members.westnet.com.au/dtilley/antenna.htm

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Follow Up By: Mr Fawlty - Sunday, Apr 02, 2006 at 19:30

Sunday, Apr 02, 2006 at 19:30
I tend to agree Doug....That thing looks surprisingly "directional" as well, maybe more suited to sit on the roof of a wwII vintage citroen van....
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Follow Up By: V8Diesel - Monday, Apr 03, 2006 at 08:29

Monday, Apr 03, 2006 at 08:29
Hahahahahaahah.......I know exactly the one's you mean too. The corrugated iron 'mini orb' pattern vans.
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Follow Up By: Member - John - Monday, Apr 03, 2006 at 14:23

Monday, Apr 03, 2006 at 14:23
Doug, the link doesn't work for me, can you repost it please? Thanks in advance.
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Follow Up By: Member - Doug T (QLD) - Monday, Apr 03, 2006 at 21:38

Monday, Apr 03, 2006 at 21:38
John
I lost your details so will have to hope you find this re-post here
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Reply By: Footloose - Sunday, Apr 02, 2006 at 20:10

Sunday, Apr 02, 2006 at 20:10
Not sure about todays broadcast radios, but they used to have an adjustment at the side where they could be "tweaked". This was done with the aerial fully extended, and at the most wanted station. It made quite a difference.
AnswerID: 164453

Reply By: Member - JohnR (Vic)&Moses - Sunday, Apr 02, 2006 at 20:38

Sunday, Apr 02, 2006 at 20:38
Bill, my AM radio in the lounge room uses a loop antenna as standard equipment but thought I would look under google for something similar and found this page for you to read through. It is a kit set up but uses the ferrite rod and a simple coil with a variable capacitor to boost all signal. See also it uses a re-radiating antenna as we know for some GPS systems. Link
Cheers,
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Reply By: Bilbo - Sunday, Apr 02, 2006 at 22:42

Sunday, Apr 02, 2006 at 22:42
Roachie,

Is this for yer truck AM radio or for yer house radio? If it's for yer truck - don't spend a hundred odd dollars.

Just get a good strong crocodile clip, fasten about 7 metres of real good copper wire (any old stuff as long as it's tough) to the clip, throw the other end of the wire over a high tree branch - ya get real good at it after while - and clip the crocodile clip to yer truck antenna.

Simple, works a treat.

Bilbo
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Follow Up By: Member - Doug T (QLD) - Monday, Apr 03, 2006 at 06:09

Monday, Apr 03, 2006 at 06:09
If i were to do that and was camped overnight as sure as the sun rises in the East I would forget it was in the tree and drive off, Now as we all know Toyota's are tough so the antennae wouldn't break but the tree ................................
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Reply By: Member - Alanc - Sunday, Apr 02, 2006 at 22:44

Sunday, Apr 02, 2006 at 22:44
For a temporary AM reception improvement clip your jumper leads together (end on end) and lay out on the ground with one end attached to your car aerial, worked for us on the GRR a few years ago.
AnswerID: 164498

Reply By: Member - Norm C (QLD) - Monday, Apr 03, 2006 at 08:20

Monday, Apr 03, 2006 at 08:20
Tunable loop antennas do work well and improve reception on AM. They improve the signal from the desired station and help screen out other nearby stations that interfere with the signal.
This same company has much cheaper models available. The one you have posted a link to requires power and is more designed for use with your car or caravan radio I think.
Cheaper simpler ones require no power or connection to the radio and work very well with a portable radio with a graphite rod antenna (which most portable AM radios have). Just sit the radio next to the loop antenna while listening at the camp site.

Another method is a 'long wire' antenna. This needs to be connected to an external antenna connection on the radio and you need a tree to hang it in and a weight and string (and accurate throw) to get it up in the tree.

For the price (about $60) the simple tunable loop model is a pretty good and convenient investment if you do some remote travel and want to listen to the radio for news, weather etc.

My (admittedly not expert) knowledge on such things comes from 20 years in the Royal Australian Signals Corps (Australian Army Signals).
AnswerID: 164518

Follow Up By: signman - Monday, Apr 03, 2006 at 13:49

Monday, Apr 03, 2006 at 13:49
Another Sig.
Balcombe '65- then Watsonia- Ingleburn- Kunungra-Vietnam etc etc.
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Follow Up By: Bilbo - Monday, Apr 03, 2006 at 16:30

Monday, Apr 03, 2006 at 16:30
Norm,

My way costs $1.50 fer the croc clip and steal the wire from somewhere ;), throwing arm cost = nil.

Source?

Father - Royal Signals, Burma, Malaya, Wingates "Chindits" - he was a "well hard lad" was my Dad, God rest his soul, and 30 Years British Telecom

Son - Electrical/Electronics/Comms Engineer.

3 Uncles and one brother - British Telecom, combined experience = about 125 years!

Good onya, Aussie!

I'm proud of anyone that served.

Bilbo

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Follow Up By: Member - Norm C (QLD) - Monday, Apr 03, 2006 at 17:59

Monday, Apr 03, 2006 at 17:59
Hi signman, I was at Balcome 1970 to 72, but as an appy. SOS was moving to Watsonia at the time. Just spent some time over the week-end with a former Sig of your era. Barry English. Perhaps you know him. Served in Vietnam with 104. Sounds like you spent some time at 1 Sig. I joined 104 just after they moved from Ingleburn to Holsworthy.

Bilbo, yours is a version of the long wire antenna I mentioned. They certainly work.
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