Shocker replacement on the road

Submitted: Wednesday, Apr 05, 2006 at 21:31
ThreadID: 32565 Views:1599 Replies:6 FollowUps:10
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Hi all
What is the wisdom on shocker replacement if one fails on the road. Should you always replace both at the same time?
The answer then determines whether I carry 1 or 2 of each shocker type on the car and camper-- three different types.
Rusty
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Reply By: Derek from Affordable Batteries & Radiators - Wednesday, Apr 05, 2006 at 21:42

Wednesday, Apr 05, 2006 at 21:42
Hi Rusty

Depends on what you drive and tow. Perhaps you can find 1 shock that will work in all 3 positions as an emergency.

If you carry too much gear you may just need all those shocks.

Regards Derek.
AnswerID: 165096

Follow Up By: RustyHelen - Wednesday, Apr 05, 2006 at 22:06

Wednesday, Apr 05, 2006 at 22:06
Thanks Derek.
Paj NM with medium duty OME set up. Shocks relatively new. No don't carry too much weight. Connectors on ends of shocks are different so am guessing that one size won't fit all.
Rusty
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Follow Up By: Derek from Affordable Batteries & Radiators - Thursday, Apr 06, 2006 at 07:17

Thursday, Apr 06, 2006 at 07:17
If all 3 sets are odd then I would test them before a big trip and replace the weak ones will good quality units before you go. If one fails replace it at your next town stop.

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Reply By: Member - Paul P (Bris) - Wednesday, Apr 05, 2006 at 22:00

Wednesday, Apr 05, 2006 at 22:00
Rusty

I do not carry spare shock absorbers. Over the years I have had only one complete set fail. I now longer use or recommend that brand. I replaced the failed rears with a readily available brand (I was in a remote area). The fronts were replaced under warranty as they failed on the way back to civilisation.

Failed shock absorbers do not make the vehicle undriveable. They should be replaced ASAP. Careful driving will allow you to proceed at a reduced pace.

I keep a regular eye on my shock absorbers, fittings and mounts when traveling. I also replace them regularly. I replace OEM's with good aftermarkets very early in the vehicles life and then look at replacement every 60 to 100,000 k depending on were I have been. Earlier if I detect a performance loss.

If one fails replace all on the same axle.

Regards

Paul
AnswerID: 165102

Reply By: Member - JohnR (Vic)&Moses - Wednesday, Apr 05, 2006 at 22:20

Wednesday, Apr 05, 2006 at 22:20
G'day Rusty, please excuse me hijacking the post briefly.

Was that you who got your picture in the daily news at the Village for high achievement? Well done if it was. I did poke my head in the office there one evening but no one knew a Rusty. You must have walked past me a few times too.
Cheers,
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John

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Follow Up By: RustyHelen - Thursday, Apr 06, 2006 at 20:49

Thursday, Apr 06, 2006 at 20:49
G'day John
Yep must admit to the 1.5 seconds of fame.....
They would not have known Rusty cause when I fill in forms I am Russell and that is what carried through to the list.
It's truely a small world and no doubt we crossed paths. On my last day I ran into a "long lost" friend from many years ago. We had been in the same area many times but just never crossed over.
Don't know about you but for me (and us really because Helen, TGLW, was a vollie at the MCG ceremonies) what a fantastic experience.
Perhaps we will catch up at the 2020 World Cup at the new soccer ground announced today.....
Rusty
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Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic)&Moses - Thursday, Apr 06, 2006 at 23:10

Thursday, Apr 06, 2006 at 23:10
Rusty, thanks for the reply. I typed up a page and a half email that covers a lot of the experience. I loved it and would love to do similar in the future. Sorry, I am not sure what a vollie is or the TGLW. I was an "Access Support Assistant" and the generic term was applied just as much at the village as anywhere else. Quite wrong when we got to the actual work in comparison to most other venues. The attitudes of people about the village were fantastic. 2020 World Cup well that means I would have to be mobile still then. Hope so, but wouldn't mind doing it overseas first. Should be opportunities to cath up before 2020.

cheers mate
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Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic)&Moses - Friday, Apr 07, 2006 at 16:51

Friday, Apr 07, 2006 at 16:51
der, John, as in vollie = vounteer. Really John.....
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John

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Follow Up By: RustyHelen - Friday, Apr 07, 2006 at 16:52

Friday, Apr 07, 2006 at 16:52
and TLGW as in The Good Lady Wife....
Rusty
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Reply By: Member - Oldplodder (QLD) - Thursday, Apr 06, 2006 at 08:03

Thursday, Apr 06, 2006 at 08:03
Sometimes carry one spare shock for each end, depends on the trip.
Usually and older one.
I wouldn't hessitate replacing only one on the road.
Car handles like a barge without shocks, even one.
Especially with independant and coil suspensions.
At least leaf springs have some inbuilt dampening.
Try it some time - carefully, when you are changing shocks.
Preferrably not on the road, but in a paddock.
AnswerID: 165160

Reply By: Member - MrBitchi (QLD) - Thursday, Apr 06, 2006 at 08:31

Thursday, Apr 06, 2006 at 08:31
Rusty, the shocks on both ends are very different. The front is a MacPherson strut type whereas the rear is a standard telecopic shock. You could replace the rear on the road but the front is a job for the workshop (who carries spring compressors in the bush?)

Personally I don't carry shocks as spares. As stated above a failed shockie won't stop you driving, just slow you down somewhat.

In case of a failure, replace them at the next town.
If your planning on a trip like the Cape, where there's heaps of corrugations, then Id look at replacing them before yuo goe if you have the least concern about them. IMHO medium duty OME's are not up to that sort of trip.
AnswerID: 165165

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen M (NSW) - Thursday, Apr 06, 2006 at 13:01

Thursday, Apr 06, 2006 at 13:01
Hi there Mrbitchi, why do you say the OME's are not up to it ? did you have a bad experience, I have OME's on my lux and have had no problems what so every, this vehicle has done two full trips round oz including major rutts heading towards the cape and are still in there, I am just about to replace now have ordered new ones in the last couple of weeks just havnt been to pick them up yet. Did they fail on you due to your vehicle being alot heavier than mine would this be an issue ? Not doubting your integrity just wondering what your problem with them was that's all, I have OME Dakkar leaf spring front and back ones are the same with an extra 2 leafs for the weight I carry. Regards Steve M
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Follow Up By: Member - MrBitchi (QLD) - Thursday, Apr 06, 2006 at 13:08

Thursday, Apr 06, 2006 at 13:08
Stephen, comment is based on the description as "Medium Duty". Personally would not fit a light weight shock for any outback use. Maybe OK for the "Safeway Gutters" but not much chop on corrugations.

The Pajero is coils all round and I believe the shockies work harder on a coil sprung vehicle.

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Follow Up By: RustyHelen - Thursday, Apr 06, 2006 at 20:56

Thursday, Apr 06, 2006 at 20:56
John
My mistake in description. Not a medium duty as in weak, medium and strong, but in terms of standard fitting, heavy load fitting (as extremes) but as I only carry weight occasionally we fitted the "medium" option. Heavy would have taken in bull bar, winch, towing all the time etc etc and given us in excess of 50mm lift.
So as well as the shocks we also fitted strengthened coils and ended up with a much firmer ride, less rock n roll that the Paj is known for, 50mm or just under lift and little sag when the camper is on.
So not a light weight shock, just medium duty.
Hope that is clearer-- certainly isn't to me and I wrote it.....
Rusty
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Follow Up By: Member - MrBitchi (QLD) - Friday, Apr 07, 2006 at 08:36

Friday, Apr 07, 2006 at 08:36
Sounds to me that "medium duty" is refering to the OME springs, not the shocks, as the shocks dont affect ride height.

I'll stand by my previous comment though about not fitting anything classed as "medium duty" for outback work. I've got heavy duty King springs fitted to mine. Was a bit sceptical that they'd be too firm, but was strongly advised by a suspension place to give them a go. Glad I did!! I find the ride / handling is excellent. It is stiffer than the OE springs but I think that's an improvement.

Fitted the Kings as the OME's are developing a bit of a rep for being a bit too soft, aspecially when loaded up. (do a search on this forum or the Pajero club forum)

Mine's still got the original shockies. When they die it will get a set of Bilstiens.

As far as your shocks are concerned, I had OME's on my NH Pajero for many years with no problems at all, so I wouldn't be worried about carrying spares. I'd be more concerned about the back end bottoming out cause your springs aren't up to it....

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Reply By: Member - Mike DID - Thursday, Apr 06, 2006 at 08:42

Thursday, Apr 06, 2006 at 08:42
If a shock fails in the Camper Trailer, just remove BOTH shocks and drive more slowly on rough roads. This is based on first-hand experience.

Mike
AnswerID: 165168

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