How long does a gas bottle last before it's empty?

Submitted: Sunday, Apr 23, 2006 at 12:25
ThreadID: 33165 Views:29146 Replies:15 FollowUps:15
This Thread has been Archived
Ruth's posted topics this morning got me thinking. I've got 3 gas bottles 9kg - home gas BBQ, and 2 smaller bottles 4kg and 3kg respectively. I use the smaller bottles for camping. Trouble is I've never bothered to time how long they last.
Does anybody have any ideas? Our camping stove is a 3 burner and will also be using a medium sized gas light.
If I can get away without packing the 3kg bottle it will save space and weight.

cheers Dunc.
Dunc
Make sure you give back more than you take

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Patrolman Pat - Sunday, Apr 23, 2006 at 12:40

Sunday, Apr 23, 2006 at 12:40
How long is a piece of string. So many variables, such as size of camping stove, how much the tap is turned on, how many burners used, outside ambient temp etc.
AnswerID: 168572

Follow Up By: Member - Duncan W (WA) - Sunday, Apr 23, 2006 at 12:48

Sunday, Apr 23, 2006 at 12:48
Fair question Pat, light would be turned on enough to give an even light without it roaring and the stove is a standard 3 burner type and in the main would be running the 3 burners at a moderate heat. But lets say worst case scenario. Bloody cold and burners blazing at maximum.

Thanks for the reply BTW.
Dunc
Make sure you give back more than you take

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 423931

Follow Up By: robak (QLD) - Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 11:11

Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 11:11
A piece of string is twice the length as from the middle to the end.

:o)
0
FollowupID: 424073

Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 17:36

Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 17:36
not so in Namibia robak, their string is joined at both ends
.
Time is an illusion produced by the passage of history
.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

0
FollowupID: 424117

Reply By: Ruth from Birdsville Caravan Park - Sunday, Apr 23, 2006 at 13:22

Sunday, Apr 23, 2006 at 13:22
We always use a 9 kg bottle - and after writing my original post was off doing some chores and thinking about taking my own advice! Wouldn't have any idea how many meals/billy boils/hours it would give me. One time I had a gauge which fitted on top and would tell me Full/half/empty (except it was faulty) - and I know how many times we've run out of gas whilst cooking (and no spare). Ian's way to measure is to pick the gas bottle up and say 'Yeah, that's enough for this trip'!
Patrolman Pat - you posed too many variables (anyone would think you were ex-Army) - so, who is going to be the guinea pig and measure? Please could I have the answer in terms of 50 billies of early morning tea and 67 dinner meals? I'm just a girl.
AnswerID: 168583

Follow Up By: Patrolman Pat - Sunday, Apr 23, 2006 at 17:59

Sunday, Apr 23, 2006 at 17:59
Not ex-Army Ruth, just a gas fitter.

Basically a gas bottle holds X MJ of gas and each appliance burns Y MJ of gas. Every cooker/gas light etc is going to be different and used differently.

I never camp in one place for long and can usually fill the first bottle before emptying the second one. Of firewood is available then the bottle doesn't get used.
0
FollowupID: 423955

Reply By: Bob - Sunday, Apr 23, 2006 at 13:44

Sunday, Apr 23, 2006 at 13:44
Easy way to check how much gas is left without scales.
The gas is in a liquid state prior to release from the bottle.
Open the valve just a tiny bit, enough to let some gas just his out.
Then tilt the bottle slowly until the liquid hits the valve. A white jet will shoot out like when you have the bottle filled.
Then picture an imaginary level line across the bottle at the valve position.
All below that line is remaining gas.

Just don't do this near a naked flame.

Bob
AnswerID: 168585

Follow Up By: ro-dah-o (WA) - Sunday, Apr 23, 2006 at 15:36

Sunday, Apr 23, 2006 at 15:36
another method is to pour hot water down the side of the bottle- It will be cold from the bottom up until it reaches the max point of gas contained inside.

0
FollowupID: 423942

Reply By: Footloose - Sunday, Apr 23, 2006 at 13:45

Sunday, Apr 23, 2006 at 13:45
Ok I'll wear some flack, but I've got broad shoulders.
2 adults, 2 kids, cooking and light for around 3 hours a night. a 9kg lasted us around a week.
To check how much gas pour warm water over the bottle, the gas will be colder than the rest of the bottle.
You can also buy a gauge that tapes on the side, uses the same system.
I've often wondered if I could buy a cheap gas gauge, like a tyre pressure gauge ?
AnswerID: 168586

Follow Up By: Footloose - Sunday, Apr 23, 2006 at 13:58

Sunday, Apr 23, 2006 at 13:58
A friend of mine saw this post and emailed me. He rekkons that its not important if the gas bottles empty, its all a matter of whether the can's empty ! :))))))))
0
FollowupID: 423941

Follow Up By: fisho64 - Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 00:41

Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 00:41
Pretty sure a pressure gauge wont tell you much as the pressure doesnt vary much until the liquid is about gone. Thats because as you use the gas off the top, the liquid boils due to the pressure drop, raises the gas pressure again til it reaches a state of equilibrium again. Hence the liquid gets cold. Exactly the same as refrigerant, which it makes an excellent substitute for by the way except for its flammability.
0
FollowupID: 424036

Follow Up By: Pajman Pete (SA) - Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 10:08

Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 10:08
If you want to use LPG as a refrigerant here is a way to do it:

Gas powered fridge

Any mug can be uncomfortable out bush

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 424062

Follow Up By: Brew69(SA) - Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 10:19

Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 10:19
Mad
0
FollowupID: 424064

Reply By: rickwagupatrol - Sunday, Apr 23, 2006 at 14:11

Sunday, Apr 23, 2006 at 14:11
A 9kg bottle will run our three way fridge in the jayco, and also supply enough through the stove for eight days straight. this is with the fridge set on "5", and using the stove for breakfast and dinner every day.
even so, we still carry a spare bottle with us.
Best way to find out how much is left is simple. Turn upside down and pour water over cylinder, gas is cold so level will show up as white area.

rick.
AnswerID: 168588

Reply By: derraux - Sunday, Apr 23, 2006 at 15:04

Sunday, Apr 23, 2006 at 15:04
you should be able to work it out using the amount of grams an hour the apliances use a small gas light uses about 66g per hour a large uses about 112g per hour each burner on your gas stove will use between 150 to 250g per hour and one kilo of gas is 1000g your products possibly have the specifications on it.
Regerd derraux
AnswerID: 168593

Reply By: hopscotch - Sunday, Apr 23, 2006 at 15:36

Sunday, Apr 23, 2006 at 15:36
Hi,
OurOdyssey ZR carried 2 x 4.5 kg gas bottles. The one driving the HW system lasted for the entire trip across the top eg 12 weeks plus a couple of weekend trips. This was on the basis that we lit the system while preparing dinner in the evening and turned it off usually as we went to bed. The system was still hot enough for washing up after breakfast.
The 2nd bottle was stove - 2 burner and grill - only and while I had it refilled after 7/8 weeks. It was not empty when that was done. By having the two bottles we reckon that the one on the HW is our back up as we can always use the stove to boil water for the washing up and swap the empty one to the HW system. Estimated total useage on the stove bottle by two people B'fast x 56 Smokos x 168 Dinners x 48
The new toy - Galaxy 18' Off Road - has two 9 kg but also has a 150l 3 way fridge as well as the 4 burner stove.
Our gaslight is on a separate 2kg bottle but only gets used when the bugs are bad.

Kevin J
AnswerID: 168599

Reply By: diver2 - Sunday, Apr 23, 2006 at 17:30

Sunday, Apr 23, 2006 at 17:30
I was amased how long the gas bottle lasted after I ditched the Gas Lamp, replaced it with a 12V Versalite and just used the bottle for the stove. Much brighter light and robust. Doesnt answer your question I know but I thought you may not be aware that those gas lights use a lot of gas
AnswerID: 168607

Reply By: David from David and Justine Olsen's 4WD Tag-Along - Sunday, Apr 23, 2006 at 17:55

Sunday, Apr 23, 2006 at 17:55
Yes far too many variables but here is my experience with my old setup now changed.

My Chescold freezer 60L running on gas for about 13 hours per day and 12V the rest of the time and on flat out when on gas uses a 9kg in 10 days. How that compares to your stove I don't know.

My 2 kg lasts 7 days when used to cook breakfast, and evening meal for two, plus a very occasional cuppa mid day.

I try to plan my trips so that I can reill evry 7 days, or else I take more gas.

Dave O

AnswerID: 168609

Reply By: Member - Duncan W (WA) - Sunday, Apr 23, 2006 at 20:42

Sunday, Apr 23, 2006 at 20:42
Thanks for all your replies. Didn't get the exact answer I wanted, but it sure helped make up my mind to take both the 4kg and 3kg bottles. Use the 4kg first and use the 3 for emergencies or until I can get the 4 refilled. Didn't know either that the bottle had to be turned upside down to tell you how much is in the bottle.
Dunc
Make sure you give back more than you take

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 168646

Follow Up By: Member - Duncs - Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 09:55

Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 09:55
Hi Dunc,

I think that is a good decision.

I have been reading this post and trying to remember how long our gas lasts. The short answer is I haven't got a clue. I am like Ian I pick the thing up and shake it, gives me a very rough idea. If I am going on an extended trip I take 2 9kg cyls and fill them both before leaving home.

I actually have three cylinders. One is attached to the bar-b-q and the others are for use with the camper, but they rotate. When the one on the bar.b. empties I swap it with one from the camper. I take the empty and get it filled, then put it on the camper as the spare. Theoretically the camper always has two full cylinders and we have never run out of gas.

Duncs.
0
FollowupID: 424060

Reply By: Robin - Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 09:19

Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 09:19
Hi Dunc

We have slightly different solution in that we use the little 220g gas cannisters for camping , also to keep weight down and reliability up. (take 2 single burner stoves).

And as per others use 12v flouro's for light mostly. (1 watt amber leds when bugs around)

With typical 100g of fuel per hour we know they last for 2 to 2 1/2 hours each which is about our daily use.

Hence when camping we just chuck in 1 can for each day out and a spare.

Makes it easy to control as you can readily monitor your use and adjust as required.

Robin Miller
AnswerID: 168690

Follow Up By: Brew69(SA) - Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 09:53

Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 09:53
Wow thats a lot of use in a day lol. I always take away 5 or 6 of those canisters and i can't even seem to run one of them out. We did 5 days at easter and almost did.
0
FollowupID: 424059

Follow Up By: Patrol22 - Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 12:49

Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 12:49
If these are the disposable type can then one thing that has to be kept in mind is that if you are in my part of the country the b*ggers don't work below zero degrees C. As I understand it they are straight butane and this stuff don't work below zero.
0
FollowupID: 424079

Follow Up By: Brew69(SA) - Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 14:00

Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 14:00
Patrol22 they are 80% Butane and 20% Propane. I have heard that you can actually get them 60/40 but not seen these myself. On the cold mornings all that is necessary is to rotate 2 cannisters.(keep one close enough to the flame as to keep warmish and use the other until it starts to flicker. I am reasonably happy with their performance and very happy to not have to cart around gas cylinders. For prolonged stops i still use the 2 burner primus gas stove tho.
0
FollowupID: 424095

Follow Up By: Robin - Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 14:26

Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 14:26
Yes its easy to rush in and get butane only ones ,sometimes $1 each

The Kovea brand is available over here (Melb) and they are 70/30. Mind you if
referring to those cheap $20 stoves they freeze up in about 1/2 time of the straight
single burner types which use fatter squat 220g container and are much easier to find in 70/30 as hikers use'em.

Robin Miller
0
FollowupID: 424099

Follow Up By: David from David and Justine Olsen's 4WD Tag-Along - Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 15:02

Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 15:02
You can always sleep with em in your swag, so thay work in the morning :-)

If they leak it could get interesting but the gas from the cans is surely better than the other stuff in there anyway :-)
0
FollowupID: 424104

Reply By: OLDMAGPIE - Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 09:49

Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 09:49
use the 9kg see how long it lasts, divide by nine then multiply by 4 & 3 that should tell you how long each bottle will last? cheers
AnswerID: 168693

Reply By: Mike Harding - Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 12:21

Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 12:21
The notes on my camping list tell me I use about 500gm of gas a day for both cooking and a 39lt gas fridge which is always set to maximum and on 24 hours a day. All my coffee/tea water and cooking is done on the gas stove and I cook moderately elaborate meals which usually simmer for an hour or two each evening plus rice or pots or similar. My shower and washing up water is heated over the fire.
This is for one or two adults.

Throw out the gas lamps (they use heaps of gas) and switch to electric or Coleman Dual Fuel lamps.

Mike Harding
AnswerID: 168699

Reply By: Bonz (Vic) - Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 17:54

Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 17:54
One thing I found is that the temp of the day and also the person who fills them, affects the amount of Gas one can fit into the bottle, I always fill mine myself here, so I know how much is in there, am thinking of moving to the gasngo things where you just get a whole new bottle each time
.
Time is an illusion produced by the passage of history
.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

AnswerID: 168733

Reply By: Member - Duncan W (WA) - Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 18:08

Monday, Apr 24, 2006 at 18:08
Thanks guys & girls keep them coming all good stuff. Didn't know about the disposable cannisters not working at low temps - bit like me.
Dunc
Make sure you give back more than you take

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 168736

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)