Which Jerry Cans

Submitted: Saturday, Apr 29, 2006 at 22:38
ThreadID: 33362 Views:4122 Replies:10 FollowUps:7
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Planning for Madigan Line Trip later this year and need to get 12 quality
metal jerry cans. So far found 2 kinds which look OK:

The Aussie Disposals Ex-Military Jerry Cans, which I can get for about $25 each
and Pro-Quip jerry cans, which I can get for about $32 each...

Anyone had any experiences with the above jerry cans in outback? Any pros/cons
with either of them?

Thanks,

Stan
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Reply By: Footloose - Saturday, Apr 29, 2006 at 22:52

Saturday, Apr 29, 2006 at 22:52
I bought some ex mil (not from there) and have some plastic fuel containers. Both get used on trips and at home. No problems with either. Make sure that you can source replacement seals for the metal ones as they may leak in time. Packing is the key, don't let them rub on anything.
AnswerID: 169748

Reply By: Shaker - Saturday, Apr 29, 2006 at 23:02

Saturday, Apr 29, 2006 at 23:02
I have used the Aussie Disposals ex military jerries for a long time, no problems at all. They will negotiate the price for quantities.
AnswerID: 169750

Reply By: Truckster (Vic) - Saturday, Apr 29, 2006 at 23:12

Saturday, Apr 29, 2006 at 23:12
Speak to Trevor H at the next meeting he used to have a 4.5 petrol, and had to carry squllions of em.
AnswerID: 169753

Follow Up By: Member - Stan (VIC) - Sunday, Apr 30, 2006 at 14:08

Sunday, Apr 30, 2006 at 14:08
Thanks, I'll have a chat to him.
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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Saturday, Apr 29, 2006 at 23:43

Saturday, Apr 29, 2006 at 23:43
Hi Stan,

I used to have problems with metal jerries - leaking from the tops, paint flaking inside and rubbing thru on the outside. I now use plastic jerries which are much better in my opinion - never leak, and very durable. I use mostly the black Rheem which are about $30 each.

Since you are using petrol and I assume that the jerries will be stored inside the vehicle, you must have a jerry that won't leak.

You'll be following our tracks - we did it in 2004 and are doing it again a couple of weeks before your group.

Cheers
Phil
AnswerID: 169754

Follow Up By: Ruth from Birdsville Caravan Park - Sunday, Apr 30, 2006 at 11:54

Sunday, Apr 30, 2006 at 11:54
Hey Phil, lucky they will be following your tracks - going to be very 'adventuresome' out there this year!
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FollowupID: 425144

Follow Up By: Member - Stan (VIC) - Sunday, Apr 30, 2006 at 14:42

Sunday, Apr 30, 2006 at 14:42
Hi Phil,

Yes, planning to store the jerries in the car, hence the question about them.
Plastics jerries in the car is not the option for this trip due to the Trip Leader requirements...

The plan is to secure them with the steel pole through the jerry handles, tightened on both ends and secured to cargo barrier.

Yeah, looks like we'll be following your tracks till Camp 16, and then going
up the Hay River/Batton Hill camp.

Stan
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Sunday, Apr 30, 2006 at 20:39

Sunday, Apr 30, 2006 at 20:39
Hi Ruth, I guess I can lead them all astray :-))) The groups I know are all well prepared, so can't imagine too many getting lost.
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Sunday, Apr 30, 2006 at 21:03

Sunday, Apr 30, 2006 at 21:03
Hi Stan,

We all know that in an ideal world, we wouldn't take petrol jerries inside a vehicle. But I understand where you're coming from.

If it were me, I'd negotiate with the leader to take the plastic jerries for your petrol. I've been in the situation where the slightest leak of petrol fumes from metal jerries inside the vehicle causes a problem. Just the smell of it drives you crazy and you keep wondering when you're going to blow up!

I took a 90series TD Prado on the 2004 Madigan Line trip. I also removed the centre seats, and made a steel cage to encase the jerries - could easily fit 12 jerries (three rows of 4) in the middle section - and they were firmly secured by the steel cage. But being diesel, I didn't need to carry that many. Also I find the ratchet straps to be the most secure method of holding down jerries. A metal bar can rub thru. I'd also suggest that all jerries need to be secured firmly to the floor.

For reasons of safety, I would never use a Tanami pump to pump petrol from inside a vehicle. You'll only need to transfer fuel, probably twice on the trip - just get the jerry cans out, eliminate the static and pour them into a funnel.

You will have weight issues for this trip - its very hard on suspension - you'll have 350kgs of fuel alone. Leave any heavy, unnecessary stuff at home.

Cheers
Phil
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FollowupID: 425273

Reply By: Member - Lindsay S (Int) - Sunday, Apr 30, 2006 at 09:01

Sunday, Apr 30, 2006 at 09:01
Just to pass on a tip I got from an old bushie once which has worked for me. To prevent rubbing damage between jerry cans cut up an old truck tube in 150mm slices or so and stretch two of these large 'rubber bands' round each can at the same height. This allows the rubber to contact rubber rather than the metal to metal without them. Not so noisy either, especially if you do not drive a Defender like me and can hear in the vehicle.
AnswerID: 169778

Follow Up By: Member - Stan (VIC) - Sunday, Apr 30, 2006 at 14:15

Sunday, Apr 30, 2006 at 14:15
Thanks for the tip, I was thinking of how to protect jerry cans from one another
but wasn't sure how to do it.
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Reply By: Member Boroma 604 - Sunday, Apr 30, 2006 at 09:09

Sunday, Apr 30, 2006 at 09:09
Gooday,
May I suggest you use 10 litre instesd of 20 litre, much easier to handle when emptying & more flexibility with storing them in your vehicle. Have only used plastic (certified ) over the past couple of years for all the reasons already outlined.
Cheers ,
boroma604.
AnswerID: 169783

Reply By: Member - Crazie (VIC) - Sunday, Apr 30, 2006 at 09:50

Sunday, Apr 30, 2006 at 09:50
Hi Stan

The pro-quip ones are the only ones approved for the US army and have some of their jerry cans have some anti spark safety in them, which reduces any heating up and expoding. They seem to be very good.

Where are you going to carry 12 jerry cans?

Ads
AnswerID: 169788

Follow Up By: Member - Stan (VIC) - Sunday, Apr 30, 2006 at 14:25

Sunday, Apr 30, 2006 at 14:25
Hi Adam

The plan so far is to remove the middle row seats for the trip and put jerry
cans in 2 rows of 6 - one row on top of the other, secured between themselves and to the cargo barrier. Ideally should be able to use the Tanami pump to transfer the petrol to the fuel tank without removing the jerry cans from the vehicle...

Stan
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Reply By: long haired nomad - Sunday, Apr 30, 2006 at 13:39

Sunday, Apr 30, 2006 at 13:39
I use the 25litre plastic jerries from ARB. The metal ones flake off on the inside and are prone to leak from rubbing.
AnswerID: 169822

Reply By: Ted (Cairns) - Sunday, Apr 30, 2006 at 15:29

Sunday, Apr 30, 2006 at 15:29
A few years ago in Europe I still had one marked "Wehrmacht 1942" which my granddad "reposessed" from the Nazis. No leaks, no flaking, no problems - in fact much better than a few new ones (consumer grade :-)) I had quite a few problems with (bad welds, bad seals, thin metal)
AnswerID: 169839

Reply By: brett - Sunday, Apr 30, 2006 at 17:51

Sunday, Apr 30, 2006 at 17:51
I've got 3 pro quip metal ones about 5 years old, 2 look pretty good inside, 1 looks like the coating on the inside is starting to bubble and come away. Last time I looked all metal jerry's seemed to be made in Latvia, my pro quip ones are. Not sure how their quality is. I reckon you got less chance of a plastic one leaking and no paint to flake off into your fuel. As long as the plastic jerry is certified for fuel with the correct AS can't see how your trip leader can say you must use metal ones.
AnswerID: 169861

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