Prado 120 owners - replacing wheel bearings in the field

Submitted: Tuesday, May 02, 2006 at 12:13
ThreadID: 33450 Views:11322 Replies:3 FollowUps:9
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I'm stocking up on my spare parts for a forthcoming trip up the Canning. I am consistently told that the Prado 120 wheel bearings are a fully sealed unit & replacing them in the field is not viable for a non-mechanic like me. They are bloody expensive too!

Has anyone actually had any experience changing them & have a different view?

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Reply By: Member - Stan (VIC) - Tuesday, May 02, 2006 at 13:27

Tuesday, May 02, 2006 at 13:27
I am doing Madigan Line/Hay River Later this year and this is
so far a list of spares to take with me. This is a list as advised by
the guy who knows Prados/Suspension stuff very well:

Gloves, 2 straps, jack, jacking plate, rated hooks,2 x bow shackles.
Tyre gauge, Air Compressor, Sand Flag
Radiator hoses - top and bottom, heater hose - 1.5m (16mm diameter)
serpantine belt, fuel filter, air filter,
wheel nuts and studs,
1lt engine,gearbox/diff/trans oil
Spare shocker washers, rubbers, locators, and mounting bolts including spare front and rear shock (You'll need a spring tensioner to change the front shock)
2 spare tyres, tyre repair equipment
Rated recovery points front and rear

Hope this helps,
Stan

AnswerID: 170216

Follow Up By: Member - Drew T (VIC) - Tuesday, May 02, 2006 at 14:03

Tuesday, May 02, 2006 at 14:03
thanks Stan. almost exactly the same as my current list except i will now add spare wheel nuts/studs. I'm just taking the old (Toyota) front & rear shockies as spares so didn't think I'd need separate washers/rubbers/locators/mounting bolts in addition to those?

Note that I also have on my list a qty of type A fuses (mini spade), a 50A type B, & a 120A type C fuse.
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FollowupID: 425576

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Tuesday, May 02, 2006 at 16:26

Tuesday, May 02, 2006 at 16:26
Stan,

If the 120 is like the 90series, the front and rear wheel studs are slightly different. If I were you I'd buy 3 of each. They did look to be interchangable - main difference was the length of the spline - and they were the same as the ones on an 80series.

Also, in addition to Drew's fuses, a bit of fusible link wire is a pretty useful spare out in the desert.

Cheers
Phil
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FollowupID: 425601

Follow Up By: Member - Drew T (VIC) - Tuesday, May 02, 2006 at 17:30

Tuesday, May 02, 2006 at 17:30
Stan, was also told by a 4WD mechanic today that changing the front shockies on a Prado120 in the field is a big difficult job .. he reckons still carry the spare shockies, but i'm probably better off driving on the failed shockies to a workshop that has the proper facilities. Well i'll still carry the spare shockies & spring compressors but will think carefully about whether i'll replace them myself beside the track!!
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FollowupID: 425611

Follow Up By: Member - Stan (VIC) - Tuesday, May 02, 2006 at 19:43

Tuesday, May 02, 2006 at 19:43
Drew, if you got washers/rubbers/locators/mounting bolts on the old Toyota shockers, then you will not need another spare lot. Yes, agree on changing failed shocks in a workshop, the spring compressors is for the worst case scenario if the shock's eye brakes off and you can't weld it on the car...

I have added a fuses and fusible wire to my list.
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FollowupID: 425669

Follow Up By: Member - Stan (VIC) - Tuesday, May 02, 2006 at 19:46

Tuesday, May 02, 2006 at 19:46
Phil,

Yep, got 6 wheel studs and nuts supplied by Darren for last year Simpson Trip,
so I assume they are correct ones :)

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FollowupID: 425671

Follow Up By: Member - Drew T (VIC) - Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 15:01

Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 15:01
Stan. just fyi ... picked up some studs/nuts from toyota & the guy confirmed for me that the front & rear studs are different. i just measured them - the fronts are about 45mm long & the rear ones about 50mm (total length)
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FollowupID: 425858

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 20:25

Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 20:25
Drew, I reckon the splines are the same diameter, so if you had to interchange them, then that would be possible.
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FollowupID: 425939

Reply By: Member - Tony G (ACT) - Tuesday, May 02, 2006 at 13:37

Tuesday, May 02, 2006 at 13:37
If it concerns you change the wheel bearings before you go. The list that Stan is carrying sounds great for that type of trip.
AnswerID: 170218

Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Tuesday, May 02, 2006 at 16:20

Tuesday, May 02, 2006 at 16:20
Don't worry about the wheel bearings. They are sealed and won't give you a problem on such a young vehicle. I've only heard of one other person needing to replace them on a 90series, and that was after 150,000+km. Rear wheel bearings are semi-floating.

Dinosaur vehicles like mine need to carry them :-((
AnswerID: 170245

Follow Up By: Gu_Patrol - Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 18:40

Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 18:40
A friend of mine had stuffed front wheel bearing after 25,000 kms on his 120 prado, the ARB guys in Regency park noticed them. It pays to get a good look over before you go.
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FollowupID: 425915

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 20:26

Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 20:26
Must have been like that from the factory. Agreed, need to be checked.
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FollowupID: 425940

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