Winching off a deep cycle battery?

Submitted: Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:12
ThreadID: 33547 Views:8156 Replies:8 FollowUps:5
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G'day All,
My question for today is:

Have any of you powered a winch off a deep cycle battery.
I am confused, I was told yes way to go and last week I was advised no.

Now, I know the whole battery decision thing is a long and hard question to answer, depending on your usage, but if anyone can tell me if they have successfully winched off a deep cycle battery without any major drama's, I'd like to know.

I'd probably be going for a deep cycle 100-130 amp, bigger is better.
I realise all the issues with deep cycle batteries needing longer to charge and so on, but I'd rather just leave the starting battery out of the whole winching process and just use the auxillary battery.

I own a cruiser so I dont expect to be doing any winching, unless it's pulling out a Land Rover or Range Rover! he he

Thanks in advance guys
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Reply By: Member - Doug T (QLD) - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:36

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:36
No worries here mate , my winch is connected to the Optima D/C, not only that when i use my winch I always have the engine running as well
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Follow Up By: Member - Doug T (QLD) - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:41

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:41
forgot to say check out photo's 2 3 4 at my webpage
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it works believe me or i would still be waiting for help, just caught not thinking about what I was doing
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Reply By: Martyn (WA) - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:54

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:54
Brendan,
I use a "normal" battery for my winching, I used a deep cycle with no real problem but I was advised with the whole charging thing that running two batteries with similar characteristics was better than running two dissimilar batteries. This will more than likely stir up a hornets nest but this is what i was advised to do and it works for me. I don't my secondary circuit enough to utilise the advantages of having a deep cycle battery installed.

Never underestimate the capabilities of a Range Rover and the limitations of lets say other vehicles. All have their faults as do Range Rovers but off road capability isn't one of them. Ho Ho Ho.
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Follow Up By: Brendan14 - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 20:22

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 20:22
Thanks Martyn,
I have been thinking of using a cranking battery instead of a deep cycle.

Also, I thought I'd get a bite regarding the Rover comment.
I must admit though, on a Pajero Challenge back in 95 I saw a Range Rover crawl down a hill where there was no road, cross a fast flowing river and head back up the other side onto the main road as a few of us were blocking the road reading the map, and all this happened at 3:30 in the morning.
We were gob smacked.
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Reply By: AndrewX - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 22:04

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 22:04
Brendan, NEVER winch without the engine running!!!!!! A deep cycle battery is not suited to winching though it may still run the winch. It's profile is more suited to low drain appliances such as fridges. I'd use the cranking battery with engine running as you will need lots of power to get a sluggish vehicle like yours out of the bogs you will certainly get into as you learn (I assume from your question that you are very new to off roading)
Good luck!!
AnswerID: 170782

Follow Up By: Brendan14 - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 20:15

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 20:15
Andrew,
I never said I was not going to run the winch without the engine running, that wasn't the question!

Also, after 12 years of offroading, I'd say I'm not new to it, just asking a question.
Thanks for the pep talk.
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Reply By: Member - Ian H (NSW) - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 22:09

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 22:09
Yes, I agree. Which off the starting battery with the engine running and leave the deep cycle doing what it should and that's keeping the beer cold for celebrating getting out of the mess you got yourself into.
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Follow Up By: Member - Ian H (NSW) - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 22:13

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 22:13
Sorry, that should read "winch" off the starting.......
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Reply By: Crackles - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 23:01

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 23:01
Brendan Have successfully winched off deep cycle batteries on 3 cars with no real problems. Compared to starting batteries they don't appear to be any slower or pull less. (Sorry no scientific tests ;-) On the first 2 cars the DC batt lasted a touch over 3 years & on the current one is 4 years old & going strong. I feel it's more to do with the quality of the battery & how rough the roads have been than the type. Only downside I have seen is the need to top up the water occationally. (more so than a start batt)
In theory a starting battery is supposably better for the fast power supply used by the winch but a deep cycle battery should last longer if you reguarly discharged it below 20 %. Many on this & other sites will tell you it shouldn't be done but in reality it works fine. A slightly longer life may be achieved with other types of batteries but there are so many variables it's difficult to compare.
The deep cycle should have no problem pulling the Rover out (Or your cruiser for that matter:-))
Cheers Craig...............
Twin 115 Trojan deep cycle batts.
AnswerID: 170801

Reply By: pprass - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 16:21

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 16:21
Do you have an isolating switch such as Pirhana running your battery system? I have and was told by the Pirhana people to never winch from the second battery (I do!) as it will fry the isolator switch. Apparently the Pirhana switch is rated at 150amps and the winch can draw upto 300 amps. However they were non commital when I asked if running the engine would make any difference.
AnswerID: 170971

Follow Up By: 120scruiser (NSW) - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 17:37

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 17:37
I concurr with that.
My mate burnt his isolator out when winching off the deep cycle battery. When the winch wants more current it tries to draw it from the other battery via the isolator.
Mine is hooked up to the main battery.
Never had a problem, although I have only used it once in anger.
Cheers
120scruiser
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Reply By: Mainey (WA) - Saturday, May 06, 2006 at 03:41

Saturday, May 06, 2006 at 03:41
The winch manufacturers I'm aware of ALL state use the Cranking battery with the engine running.

Deep cycle batteries are NOT designed for winching, which requires heaps of power instantly, they are designed for continious supply of low power over an extended time period - as when powering a fridge or lights, definately not a winch!!!
Can you use a DC battery to run a winch, yes :-((
You can drive in the right hand lane of the freeway also - does not make it correct!!!

AGM DC's charge quicker than a wet cell Cranker battery - when used for the same purpose, eg, powering a fridge.

I would NOT sell you a Deep Cycle battery to run a winch.........
AnswerID: 171082

Reply By: Member - Mike DID - Saturday, May 06, 2006 at 08:16

Saturday, May 06, 2006 at 08:16
What type of Deep Cycle battery are you considering ?

A Wet Cell Deep Cycle is definitely not good at providing the high currrent needed for starting or winching.

AGM (totally sealed) Deep cycle batteries are good at both Deep Cycle and Starting/Winching. My 80 amphour (10 inch) Remco AGM is rated by the manufacturer to supply 550 amps for 5 seconds and 300 amps continuously.

Mike
AnswerID: 171097

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