Coongie Lakes - water?

Submitted: Friday, May 05, 2006 at 09:00
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Would Ruth or some of our outoutback travellers know if the recent floodwaters made it to Coongie Lakes?
If yes, was it barely a trickle or more?
We are leaving in 4 weeks & will either pack hicking boots, or a canoe.
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Reply By: Ruth from Birdsville Caravan Park - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 11:04

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 11:04
Keith, there is some water in Coongie Lakes anyway - not much tho. Yes the Cooper water will make it to Coongie Lakes but it is travelling very slowly, probably make it by the time you get there. Will update as I hear more.
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Follow Up By: Keith_A (Qld) - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 18:46

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 18:46
Thanks Ruth - appreciate your updates.
(nb - there is a possibility we met 30 yrs ago when you were a governess around Eromanga, as was my sister Pam.)
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Follow Up By: Ruth from Birdsville Caravan Park - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 19:54

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 19:54
Keith, oh my!!!! Was Pam at "Yambutta"?
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Follow Up By: Keith_A (Qld) - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 20:10

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 20:10
Corowa Downs (and Bodella) with Tony & Margaret Pegler.
But hey - it was a long time back.
We have visted several times since, and hope to see Bill again this year, but there may be a family re-union being organised on the east coast, so they may not be home in June.
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Follow Up By: Ruth from Birdsville Caravan Park - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 20:51

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 20:51
OK, so I must have been at "Congie" - oh, that's so amazing. Where is she now, doing what?
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Follow Up By: Keith_A (Qld) - Sunday, May 07, 2006 at 11:26

Sunday, May 07, 2006 at 11:26
Hi Ruth - Pam is now in Adelaide.
She has met you recently (in last 6 years) and you both know many of the same people from that era. While she was governessing we visited several times, and since then have been back. So while it is possible I met you on one of those visits many years ago, the probability may be low.
Nice to have a common connection though.
...............kind regards...............Keith
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Reply By: Member - Michael O (NSW) - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 11:36

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 11:36
Hi Keith

We were at Coongie about 10 days ago and it was very shallow. Actually it's only 2 metres deep when it's full...Plus it loses over 3 metres a year in evaporation!

Took the kayak but no chance of using it. Don't be put off though, we thought it was magic!

The Cooper is on the rise after rains around Longreach but I would be stunned if it made much difference to Coongie between now and when you get there.
Monday I have Friday on my mind...
The Easybeats 1966

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Follow Up By: Keith_A (Qld) - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 18:48

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 18:48
Thanks Michael - will leave the boat at home and stick to hiking.
Any tips you could pass on? - eg camping spots, tracks, things not to miss, insects, etc..............Keith
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Follow Up By: Member - Michael O (NSW) - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 21:29

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 21:29
Not sure if you have been there before Keith...

Don't leave the canoe at home though. There are plenty of places to use it around on the Cooper at Innamincka.

The road out from Innamincka is in good nick at the moment but check the depth of the causeway. If the Cooper is on the rise you will need to carry enough fuel to go around the long way via the Dig Tree just in case you can't get back thru the causeway.

Good stops on the way out at Scrubby Camp and Kudriemitchie Outstation. There were a few camped there as Kudriemitchie is the last place where you can have a fire (banned at Coongie) Facilities there are pretty good as it's looked after by a 4WD Club (Landcruiser I think...) On a water hole but I wouldn't swim there at present.

The road is a little windy around here but no problem as the speed limit is only 40 anyway.

Once out at the Lake itself there are 2 main camping areas. The first is 4wd only across some sand hills. No prob in the Patrol but I wasn't keen on taking the trailer in there. The camping is more protected but a looonnnng way from the water. Great views from some of the taller dunes towards the end of the track and we spent quite some time out there watching dingoes and brolgas at different times of the day.

The other camping area is close to the day use area and are little sandy areas backing onto the Creek not far from where it empties into the Lake. There was no-one else there for the 2 days we were there (which I felt was enough time) Remember no fires, no water, a long drop dunny (with a view).

Easy walk down to the lake shore to watch the birds and collect some pipis (mussels if you like...)

Sensational place and worth the trip. And get up early and watch the sunrise. You won't regret it...
Monday I have Friday on my mind...
The Easybeats 1966

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Reply By: Mad Dog (Australia) - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 19:34

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 19:34
From the ABC

Floodwaters in Queensland's south-western Channel Country are slowly making their way to Lake Eyre in South Australia, but it will be some time before they reach central Australia.

Flooding has eased in Cooper Creek at Windorah and the flood peak from last month's central western rain is now about 200 kilometres further downstream.

John Ferguson from Durham Downs says the water seems to be travelling slower than usual, but it will be welcome once it arrives.

"A moderate flood, a useful flood ... it'll be a big help to what we had anyhow," he said.

"We've been in drought here seriously for four years, I think we only measured 120 millimetres of rain last year and so far this year we've only had 80mm, so we haven't seen decent rain in this country for four years, so a bit of water is what we need."

Mr Ferguson says it will be another week or so before the water reaches the station.

"It's not going to what they usually run ... you know it generally comes down three weeks, but I reckon this one is going to be four weeks - whether it's the drought or the dry country or what, but it's definitely travelling very slow ... I'd think it'd be 10 days before the lead water hits here at Durham," he said.

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Follow Up By: Keith_A (Qld) - Saturday, May 06, 2006 at 08:16

Saturday, May 06, 2006 at 08:16
Thanks Ray - all info adds to the overall picture.
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