Central Tyre Inflation

Submitted: Tuesday, May 09, 2006 at 20:40
ThreadID: 33733 Views:3680 Replies:7 FollowUps:4
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I seen a troopCarrier in the SD over Easter with this setup fitted , Maybe ok if your towing as he was but I think it could be a hinderance if you have go off track , prone to getting torn off by shrubs or sticks as was protruding well out from the Free-wheel hub control, For the heavy vehicle set up on sealed roads and carrying weights it would be a great idea but I don't see the value for 4 piddlin little tyres
www.aircti.com/Frameset-1.htm
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Reply By: Steve - Tuesday, May 09, 2006 at 20:53

Tuesday, May 09, 2006 at 20:53
Just another remote control, mate.
AnswerID: 171804

Reply By: Ted (Cairns) - Tuesday, May 09, 2006 at 20:54

Tuesday, May 09, 2006 at 20:54
Yes logging trucks in NZ have this setup, as they need traction going uphill empty. Military spec vehicles have central tyre inflation, BUT going through the hub. As for 4wd use, having pierced a mudflap with a branch and finding a thick 2m long branch wedged in my tranny crossmember after my last "mental health break" forrest 4wd trip, I really don't think they'll last a trip in rough terrain.
AnswerID: 171806

Follow Up By: SteveL - Tuesday, May 09, 2006 at 21:49

Tuesday, May 09, 2006 at 21:49
It is also very common on log trucks in the Vic. High Country.-Steve
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Reply By: Rick (S.A.) - Tuesday, May 09, 2006 at 21:56

Tuesday, May 09, 2006 at 21:56
Doug,

was it Diamantina Tours, with a big boxy trailer? I saw them on the Birdsville track about then, & thought I spied that also. I agree with your sentiments; and I also thought they were on the rears as well.
But if it was Diamantina I would take a second breath. Andrew has had more experience there than almost any other - he told me that particular crossing was the worst he has ever done, & that the eastern dune face was sometimes 80 degrees.

Cheers
AnswerID: 171822

Follow Up By: Member - Doug T (QLD) - Tuesday, May 09, 2006 at 22:01

Tuesday, May 09, 2006 at 22:01
Yep I reackon your right , a high boxy trailer that looked like it would tip at the slightest dip and a few other 4x4s behind , Oh i had no doubt he knew what he was about with the good setup he had for GPS-LAPTOP, the one good thing about a pressure set up like that would be each tyre would be exactly same pressure.
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Follow Up By: Rick (S.A.) - Tuesday, May 09, 2006 at 22:25

Tuesday, May 09, 2006 at 22:25
He has tipped it once that I know of, before 1998. For years he used an ordinary towbar ball. The front of the trailer is a huge vertical icebox that keeps ice for about 12 days. The rest is a work of art contrived for his cooking/gourmet tours.

Top operator, is Andrew. Great cook & he has a sound working knowledge of the hsitory, settlement, flora & fauna of the rangelands.
He tells me travel access is getting more & more restricted in the rangelands. A concern, indeed.

Cheers
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Follow Up By: Member - Doug T (QLD) - Tuesday, May 09, 2006 at 22:36

Tuesday, May 09, 2006 at 22:36
Yeh thanks Rick, did he mean Western Face maybe ??? cos I was on the QAA the 40klm French/L then East bound on the Rig Rd , when I was heading West I found It easy but East on the R/Rd was very tough going , in fact impossible to use the normal track on most crests , many detours were taken up to 1.5 klm to the north and at the last dune before the K1 was a real stopper , went 2.3 klm to the South to get over , I usually travel alone, did you see my pics , The one where I got stuck was rediculous ,was thinking more about the big bowl of Cornflakes I was going to have soon instead of concetrating Site Link
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Reply By: Member - JohnR (Vic)&Moses - Tuesday, May 09, 2006 at 22:54

Tuesday, May 09, 2006 at 22:54
Saw it last year in Birdsville and Willem and I commented on it a few months ago. It uses braided hydraulic hose so should be good for strength but I would worry about it being caught on sticks or roots. The guy who made the outfit was from Moe in Gippsland, Victoria. There are a few sticks down that way to prove it for him, so perhap so I am wrong again!
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AnswerID: 171836

Reply By: Shawsie (Member - Bris) - Wednesday, May 10, 2006 at 13:40

Wednesday, May 10, 2006 at 13:40
Seen these on 4wd tour busses on Fraser Island that stick to the tracks, but wouldn't think them too practical for real offroad use. Very handy tho :o)
AnswerID: 171928

Reply By: DesC - Wednesday, May 10, 2006 at 17:55

Wednesday, May 10, 2006 at 17:55
Gee that would be handy on a blacksoil road after a bit of rain.
AnswerID: 171968

Reply By: Wayne (NSW) - Wednesday, May 10, 2006 at 18:21

Wednesday, May 10, 2006 at 18:21
Doug,

Saw Andrew on the CSR last year with the Troopie.

I thought about it but then thought how often do you let the tyre down. I would, like Andrew, have to wait until the rest of the convey let there tyres down so I will keep the dollars that it would have cost and spend it om a new GPS.

Wayne
AnswerID: 171978

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