Remote communities

Submitted: Friday, May 26, 2006 at 00:29
ThreadID: 34271 Views:1884 Replies:10 FollowUps:10
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A post a few days ago on remote Aboriginal communities generated a lot of discussion.

I was wondering how many people touring Australia would consider stopping in a good, peaceful community during their travels if it was possible to do so?

Barnesy
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Reply By: Slunnie - Friday, May 26, 2006 at 00:47

Friday, May 26, 2006 at 00:47
Yep, I would. Thats the plan for next winters trip.
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Follow Up By: Barnesy - Friday, May 26, 2006 at 01:26

Friday, May 26, 2006 at 01:26
Where are you going Slunnie?
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Follow Up By: Slunnie - Friday, May 26, 2006 at 07:49

Friday, May 26, 2006 at 07:49
Gday Barnesy

The plan is to do the Hay river run, between Poeppell Corner and the Plenty hwy. There is aboriginal land inbetween with a fella that does bush tucker tours of the area. They ask yiou to stay a night there and take a tour if you're passing through, but I think its one of those things that you'd do even if you were not asked.

Cheers
Slunnie
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Follow Up By: Darian (SA) - Friday, May 26, 2006 at 08:37

Friday, May 26, 2006 at 08:37
Lindsay Bookie is the aboriginal bloke you speak of........

www.direct4wd.com.au/tours/hay_access.htm

Seems a winner, as far as tourism goes - others here speak well of the experience - have met people in trip camps who said the same - "top value" they said.
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Follow Up By: Footloose - Friday, May 26, 2006 at 09:16

Friday, May 26, 2006 at 09:16
Yep, Lindsay is a winner all right. And there are many other quiet achievers out there that aren't sitting on their backsides or causing trouble. But like the white kids who make the headlines, they're a minority.
You can't just drag some people kicking and screaming from one culture to the other in just two hundred years. There are many many issues and each community is different.
However, the time has come for the broader Australian taxpaying community to be able to have a critical look without being labelled racist.
Only then can such communities move in a positive direction.
Frankly, I got sick and tired of the "we pay, you play" policy a long time ago. With rights go responsibilities.
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Follow Up By: Barnesy - Friday, May 26, 2006 at 13:14

Friday, May 26, 2006 at 13:14
I have been on several Aboriginal cultural tours and enjoyed them all. Les hiddins the bush tucker man, learning about bush tucker from Aboriginals first got me interested in going bush as a youngster.

I think it's important that with all of the long over due emphasis on communities such as Wadeye that we don't forget about all of the positives at the same time.

It's interesting Footloose that this much hyped meeting in Canberra between minister for Ab. affairs and NT chief minister occurring in next couple of days, that no Aboriginal leaders are invited.

Having some of the people in question present would be a good start don't you think?
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Follow Up By: Footloose - Friday, May 26, 2006 at 13:58

Friday, May 26, 2006 at 13:58
Barnsey, I think that the meeting probably wasn't targetting a particular group, but rather the question of who is going to be responsible for what areas especially funding.
If that wasn't the case then it's bordering on criminal. How do they think they'll effect any improvements without those people ?
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Reply By: Member - Doug T (QLD) - Friday, May 26, 2006 at 03:38

Friday, May 26, 2006 at 03:38
Wadeye would be perfect
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Follow Up By: Barnesy - Friday, May 26, 2006 at 13:19

Friday, May 26, 2006 at 13:19
I don't think Wadeye is a good, peaceful community Doug T. Wadeye is perfect for emphasising other aspects of current life as an Aboriginal person.
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Reply By: hopscotch - Friday, May 26, 2006 at 08:04

Friday, May 26, 2006 at 08:04
Hey Doug T, You've been in the Isa toooo long. Your outlook has been tainted.

Kevin J (Lived and worked across the top for 20 years)
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Reply By: Nav 8 - Friday, May 26, 2006 at 10:21

Friday, May 26, 2006 at 10:21
You will find a lot of the communities are out of bounds to travelers. Even if you have a permit to travel the road it does not allow you to enter the town site.We experienced this a few years back when traveling the Great central road in WA. We knew a teacher who lived in the community but were not allowed to enter without an escort in and out. Nav.
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Follow Up By: Barnesy - Friday, May 26, 2006 at 13:25

Friday, May 26, 2006 at 13:25
I know Nav 8. Desert people are more private than communities in the top end for example who have had contact with others for thousands of years, desert people have not. Being closed off for so long is one of the many reasons why this has been easy to brush under the carpet.
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Reply By: Mike Harding - Friday, May 26, 2006 at 13:30

Friday, May 26, 2006 at 13:30
Of course. Why ever not, I stop in small communities all over the world when I travel overseas but I avoid those where I think there will be trouble. otoh keep in mind that with permits required for whites for so many areas, and communities which don't want white people there at all, it's not an easy thing to do.

I see an irony here which makes me smile - many years ago I had some small involvement in ending an oppressive white government which implemented pass laws against blacks - it appears pass laws against whites are OK :)

Mike Harding
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Reply By: Atomnaki - Friday, May 26, 2006 at 13:32

Friday, May 26, 2006 at 13:32
Can't see why you wouldn't stay in any community if it was peaceful and had something to offer you. Whether it be an Aboriginal community or not.
We have been to a few Aborginal communities on our travels over the years, and always paid for permits to either travel the roads through and/or to enter the communitiy as well. Don't mind that, however have a small question: Do people from other Aboriginal communities need to get a permit to enter one not of their tribe or do they just have automatic entry? Main reason for the question is that a permit is only granted for one particular area/community at a time as there is not a general permit that allows you into all Aboriginal lands.
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Follow Up By: Member - Jiarna (NT) - Friday, May 26, 2006 at 15:02

Friday, May 26, 2006 at 15:02
No they don't. The permit system is based on race, and contravenes a number of international and Australian laws, but what can you do? Someone earlier mentioned about remote communities being brushed under the carpet. That's true, in part because few businesses want to do business in an area where they can't get access or where access can be denied on a whim. Even government workers such as health staff can get their permits suspended if the community (ie: the head person of the day) takes a dislike to them. And there's no appeal.

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Reply By: Member - Beatit (QLD) - Friday, May 26, 2006 at 14:24

Friday, May 26, 2006 at 14:24
I would and have but it is a difficult question without it degenerating into some anti racial debate. I have found that the places I've passed through I have felt safe, that is in Qld, WA, SA and NT and I have been happy to patronise any of the commercial ventures available (including Ayers rock, art, accomodation, local shops and other attractions) so no problem there. I will respect their way of life and will do the right thing etc. The only time I haven't felt safe was when I was looking for a camp in Iron Range and we happen upon some young guys hitting the turps and les than friendly but that was more about the grog and their camp being crowded than there skin colour.

There is a distinct difference in the way certain communities conduct themselves (their business - not mine) with mixed receptions to strangers. Some communities do marvelous things and others are embarrasing and I really don't understand this at all. And I am trying very hard not to impose a western culture/values on what I see but rather trying to understand the confusing message this sends.

Kind regards
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Reply By: Truckster (Vic) - Friday, May 26, 2006 at 14:28

Friday, May 26, 2006 at 14:28
Only if my insurance covered me there...
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Reply By: Member - Nick (Kununurra) - Friday, May 26, 2006 at 21:18

Friday, May 26, 2006 at 21:18
Been through quite a few outback communities and have never struck trouble, yet.But its how quickly trouble brews that would stop me,one minute everything is fine,the next all h--l breaks loose.Im a game man but not that game.
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Follow Up By: Member - Nick (Kununurra) - Friday, May 26, 2006 at 21:21

Friday, May 26, 2006 at 21:21
Should add,I love being out in these communities(of a day)they are such an eye opener.And meeting some of the old Aboriginal elders and hearing their stories is a once in a life time experiance.
Still wouldnt sleep in a comunity though.
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Reply By: Steve - Friday, May 26, 2006 at 22:41

Friday, May 26, 2006 at 22:41
Travel through the country and call by local communities, respect their wishes and enjoy, the only bad experiences we have encounterd ( 8 years travelling) are the drunken sods who are' non indiginous' and who probably come from the local stations or towns and cause drunken havoc among the communities as they get their 'high' on scaring bleep e out of campers and other visitors who contribute to the community and support their endeavours ....life blood that these towns rely on ...
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