80 series wheel studs

Submitted: Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 21:11
ThreadID: 34354 Views:2981 Replies:7 FollowUps:16
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The little dooverlackies (note my knowledge here ...NOT) that the wheel nuts screw onto. Wheel studs ? Ok now that I've mastered that bit, how many 80 series owners have had one or more break ? Is it common enough for me to carry them on remote area trips ?
TIA
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Reply By: Member - Doug T (QLD) - Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 21:13

Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 21:13
Was it wheel stud or axle stud , not sure what 80s have down there, is it same as 75s
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Follow Up By: Footloose - Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 21:23

Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 21:23
Doug, thanks for the reply. Wheel stud I *think*. The actual wheel is bolted onto them. I know that some people have broken one or a few, but just wondered if it is common ?
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Follow Up By: Member - Doug T (QLD) - Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 21:34

Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 21:34
Yeh ok probably not all that common , maybe we should ask Ron Moon ....Huh i paid $39 for that

Was just wondering about the studs because I sheered all 6 of the axle studs when the rear auto locker gave a big kick in the ass , anyhow i replaced them all and then put 3 spot welds around the flange and all ok so far and gave no trouble in the SD but i am keeping a close eye on it , and i also have a spare set in my toolbox with drill bits and easy-outs and if i go offroad i will be taking an Angle grinder that i can run off the 800w inverter to take the weld off if i need to take the axle out
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Follow Up By: Footloose - Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 21:39

Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 21:39
Doug, you'll need a trailer to carry all that gear. You'd better throw in a generator , some hitch hikers and a microwave just in case :))))))))
PS The hitch hikers are to help dig you out.

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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 21:41

Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 21:41
Doug,
The 75 and 80series have 8mm axle studs (what you broke). The 78 and 100 series had 10mm studs. I believe some people have been drilling and retapping and using the bigger studs.
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Follow Up By: Member - Doug T (QLD) - Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 21:48

Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 21:48
Phil
I too have heard about that but would it not make the axle housing weaker , there is not much room to play with , besides the weld is working ok so far but if it gives trouble I will remove the auto locker and fit an air locker, the front gives no trouble and i also believe that when in 4WD the front driven wheels take a lot of stress of the back , ....maybe , well thats my theory and the only time i've had problems is when in towns on hard sealed roads and starting off from lights in a straight line, out in the dunes it was a dream
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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 21:48

Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 21:48
Hi Footy,

Yep, I carry wheel studs as spares. I've been away with others who have had them break. Either a single stud when changing a tyre or a whole bunch of them when driving along. They're a pretty cheap and useful spare part.

I think you'll find theres minor differences between front and rear studs on the 80series.

Some anti-sieze compound, or a smear of grease on the threads usually allows the wheel nuts to torque up correctly, and they undo smoothly, so I believe this is one of the tricks to avoiding studs breaking.

Cheers
Phil
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Follow Up By: Member - Doug T (QLD) - Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 21:50

Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 21:50
Hey Phil
I know why , bluddy rattle guns in inexperienced hands over tighten the wheel nuts and thats what causes it
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Follow Up By: Footloose - Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 21:54

Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 21:54
Thanks, Phil. I've never experienced it myself. But that's one *pleasure*that can wait :)

Doug, are you saying that an auto locker caused your problems ?
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Follow Up By: Member - Doug T (QLD) - Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 21:59

Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 21:59
Footloose
Yes and no mate , I think it was a combination of both, probably loose stud nuts and a locker kick at the same time , with the weld spots and tight nuts ...[on the car silly ] and used loctite on the threads it seems to be ok
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Follow Up By: Footloose - Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 22:04

Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 22:04
Doug, I dont have lockers so I'm probably blowing it out my ears :) But if they "kick" then I would seriously question if I would want them anyway. Yes I know traction wise they are the ducks guts, but it looks like all you need is a loose nut and .....
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Follow Up By: Member - Doug T (QLD) - Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 22:12

Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 22:12
Normally that kick is no worries , sometimes when your least expecting it it scares ya for a split second , yes you do have to drive different , meaning you don't try and drag everything off at the lights and when doing a U turn do it gently without any throttle , I had one in the rear of my Rocky and it was magic , thing is they are always working , 2 wheels driving when in 2wd not one they unlock when turning and normally you don't hear a thing , I have heard of people say that front lockers have nearly put them into a tree or what ever , my answer to that is simple , learn to drive , I found my troopy was very steerable on dunes and yes can be tricky in blacksoil mud
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Reply By: Member - Doug T (QLD) - Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 21:52

Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 21:52
Footsy
OMEs take good care of the weight and as for Hikers ..... nup ...pain in the butt
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Follow Up By: Member - Doug T (QLD) - Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 21:55

Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 21:55
Hey Footloose
forgot to mention , go to my View Members Rig & Profile and have a look at the new pic , bottom row right side
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Follow Up By: Footloose - Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 21:56

Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 21:56
Have to agree there, although I did once manage to avoid a female backpacker that could have just lifted the 80 out of a bog I rekkon ! Heaven help any argueing male :((
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Reply By: Member - DOZER- Monday, May 29, 2006 at 07:36

Monday, May 29, 2006 at 07:36
If going outback, i would keep a set of 6 handy....i have broken 5, and stripped the 6th...and it wasnt too far away either....amazing how that will stop your progress... get a set of axle studs aswell....they are on ebay alot cheaper than toyota...
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Reply By: Sea-Dog - Monday, May 29, 2006 at 16:30

Monday, May 29, 2006 at 16:30
I have only seen one break and that is because my mate used his foot to try to turn the wheel brace which basically just sheered it off....

I have never even looked like snapping one and I have done a few wheel changes in my time...

Just don't overtighten them in the first place and you should be right.. but carry one or two anyway just to be sure..

Cheers
AnswerID: 175405

Reply By: Alan H (Narangba QLD) - Monday, May 29, 2006 at 16:31

Monday, May 29, 2006 at 16:31
I have lost several studs and now would never go bush without spares.

The front and rear have different lengths so be sure to get some of each.
When they do go you also lose the wheel nut so get stud plus nut and carry them at all times.

I lost a three about 150km north of Camoolweal and had to spread existing studs around the vehicle to get out.
AnswerID: 175406

Follow Up By: TroopyTracker - Tuesday, May 30, 2006 at 19:40

Tuesday, May 30, 2006 at 19:40
G'day Alan (or anyone who feels like answering),
How do you remove the broken wheel studs once they've snapped?? Same with the axle studs of which I've busted 9 of in the last 2 years or so!!! Paid a mechanic to remove and replace both times but have wondered if it could be done easily enough ( and neatly enough to refit new ones) on the road.

First time with the axle studs, I was down to one when I drove into the mechanics driveway. Both times they blamed loose wheel bearings-not heavy foot and locked diffs the night before ;-)

Thanks
Matt
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Follow Up By: Alan H (Narangba QLD) - Tuesday, May 30, 2006 at 20:41

Tuesday, May 30, 2006 at 20:41
Matt

As described below the studs are a press fit with splines. They came out easily enough by tapping out with a drift of some sort and then put the new one in and pulled it into the splines with the wheel nut.

It was an easy and fairly quick job as nothing needs to be dismantled but it helps if you have hammers, drifts etc around and the main ingredient is the replacement studs.

Mine broke going over very rocky road and we pulled up for a break to find them missing. We had some studs with us and some nuts but was short of two wheel nuts. Luckily we found and old tray back wreck in a paddock which still had wheel nuts and hence we got home again.

I now carry studs and nuts for front and back. They are probably stressed by things like rattle guns but let go under the stress of rough roads.
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Follow Up By: TroopyTracker - Thursday, Jun 01, 2006 at 06:54

Thursday, Jun 01, 2006 at 06:54
Thanks for that Alan,

I carry drifts and a couple of hammers so I'll get a hold of some studs Just in case.

I'm not the most mechanically minded person but when you say "tapping out" do you mean from behind?? Haven't looked at them with removal in mind but figure you can't get to the back of them very easily. I'm guessing you mean giving the hub a belt around the stud itself?? What about the axle studs, they are threaded?

Thanks
Matt
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Follow Up By: Alan H (Narangba QLD) - Thursday, Jun 01, 2006 at 18:34

Thursday, Jun 01, 2006 at 18:34
Matt

The studs sit in the wheel hub and have a lip at the rear which is to the inside of the hub/axle flange and the threaded end of course sticks out to the outside. They have splines on them where they go through the hub/axle flange to prevent the stud from rotating in the hole.

They usually break at the end of the thread for the wheel nut. So you just belt them in towards the inside of the vehicle and then put the new one in from behind the hub/flange (from inside of vehicle to the outside) This is fiddly as the new stud is much longer. Once started in the hole you align the splines to suit the hole and then push them in as far as you can which is usally not very far and then use a wheel nut (no wheel) to pull them through the splines. Once in place put the wheel on and tighten. Then down the road a bit I'd check all the wheel nuts again as they may have settled in a bit and require tightening.

It is obvious what to do if you watch how the broken bit comes out. Sometimes the brake drum on the rear can be a problem to get off but a gentle tap close to the studs usually loosens it.

Have fun out there - if you carry spares Murphy's law will mean you will never need to replace them.
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Reply By: HJ60-2H - Tuesday, May 30, 2006 at 20:12

Tuesday, May 30, 2006 at 20:12
Wheel studs are a press fit into the hub or rotor. So basically belt them out with a hammer. May need a drift to help. I carry an old wheel nut welded into a piece of pipe. If there is enough thread left on the stud then screw the nut on a pipe tool onto the stud and then "tap" it out with a hammer. Takea few good solid knocks to get it moving, but once loosened it is easy to finish it off. Easier if you remove the hub as well. They go in by slowly tightening them. This is routine when you change brake rotors.
AnswerID: 175717

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