Recovery Gear (Again)

Submitted: Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 07:19
ThreadID: 34452 Views:2101 Replies:9 FollowUps:6
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Hi,

I am looking into snatch straps for my LC100 and have been told various things. I have been told a 9000lb one would be ok and also have been told that a 12000lb would be minimum. The thing that really puzzles me is both times it has been recommended that I get 2 x 3.5t shackels, now either way the shackels are only rated to 8000lb roughly, is this normal practice, surely you would want to have the strap let go before your shackels or is there something I am missing.
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Reply By: Member - MrBitchi (QLD) - Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 07:51

Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 07:51
The shackle rating is 3.5t Safe Working Load (SWL) which is about 15% of their actual capacity. The shackle will be the last thing to fail. More important is the capacity of the attachment points (recovery hooks or towbar pin) cause if one of these lets go and you have a shackle on the end of the strap it will get launched like a bullet, and can be just as fatal.

Only use shackles if you can't avoid it.
AnswerID: 175808

Follow Up By: Scoey (QLD) - Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 08:32

Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 08:32
Just on the snatch straps - they've been known to fail way below their rated limit as well - so the strap will always fail before the shackles!

Scoey
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Reply By: agsmky - Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 08:00

Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 08:00
A 3.2 tonne shackle meeting AS2741 should break at no less than 16.0 tonne.......the 3.2 rating is the Working Load Limit (a safety margin).

For more info, check out http://www.beaver.com.au/news/Shackles.pdf

andrew
AnswerID: 175810

Reply By: Member - MUZBRY VIC) - Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 08:02

Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 08:02
Gday
The break weight of the straps is 8000 lbs That is approx 3.5 ton ..The shackles are rated at 3.5 t safe working load... but break ton is at minimum double that weight.
i am trying to find the spec,,will post the specs as soon as found
Muzbry
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AnswerID: 175811

Follow Up By: agsmky - Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 09:59

Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 09:59
look up one :-)
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FollowupID: 431896

Reply By: Scubaroo - Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 08:12

Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 08:12
Yeah, straps are rated at or just below their failure load - shackles are *way* stronger. Many recovery points probably fail before the shackles.

I would also grab some 4.7t shackles - they are slightly larger and easier to handle with straps, and you can use them for other things like joining tree trunk protectors and winch straps etc because you can thread multiple straps on them, but there might be times when a 3.2t is the only one that fits someone's vehicle. I've been able to recover a Saab (tow it out of a pothole that the driver shouldn't have driven into!) using it's rear tow point and a 4.7t shackle though - the larger shackle's pin fit through the tow point loop.
AnswerID: 175819

Reply By: Mike Harding - Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 10:23

Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 10:23
iirc there is no Australian Standard relating to snatch straps so the ratings attributed to them are simply what the manufacturer decides - treat with caution.

Personally I hate the bloody things and only use as a last resort - try just towing the stuck vehicle out before attempting a snatch.

Mike Harding
AnswerID: 175851

Follow Up By: chump_boy - Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 10:52

Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 10:52
I'm with you on that one Mike - I prefer nice slow predictable winching as opposed to the sudden forces involved in a snatch.

I still have one though, which I only use for beach sand, but just because the loads and speeds involved can be pretty low. And winching on sand is just not fun!

Cheers,

Chump
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FollowupID: 431905

Reply By: Footloose - Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 10:54

Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 10:54
If you must use snatch straps, and personally I don't like them, be aware that lots of things can influence their SWL. The loaded weight of the vehicle (all your gear inside etc) and the vertical angle of the slope etc can all make your vehicle look like a bigger anchor than you might think. So buy the best and highest rated one that you can, maintain it well and use it with extreme caution.
AnswerID: 175857

Reply By: Emo - Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 14:50

Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 14:50
I've used snatch straps for years and as long as you follow a few basic saftely principles you will have no problems. I would hate to think how I'd have gotten out of some situations without a snatch strap.
AnswerID: 175907

Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 15:38

Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 15:38
I know people who have smoked for years and are still alive.
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FollowupID: 431961

Follow Up By: Member - Brian (Gold Coast) - Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 18:43

Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 18:43
"Mike Harding posted this followup

I know people who have smoked for years and are still alive."

ROTFLMAO Mike..... that's Gold.
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FollowupID: 432013

Reply By: Member - Brian (Gold Coast) - Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 18:49

Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 18:49
A common misconception is that the strap should be hauled out as soon as you're stuck. The ideal thing is to NOT get stuck, but unfortunately it happens to all of us sooner or later. The thing is you DON'T have to have the recovering truck screaming off at full noise to recover someone. If you have to do that, it's too stuck!

IF a strap is NECESSARY!!!!!... then the revovering truck should simply stretch the strap to give it it's elsatic effect, it will then do the job efficiently!

Notice I said "IF a strap is NECESSARY!!!!!... ".... most of the time a GENTLE tow with a tow strap or chain is all that's required.

And like I said, it's easier to NOT get stuck........

(Brian sit's back waiting the flames to arrive!!!! LOL...)

Cheers
Brian
AnswerID: 175960

Follow Up By: Member - Axle - Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 19:43

Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 19:43
Brian

I agree, First time Ive heard something sensible said in regards to recovery.

Been in earthmoving for years ,helped pull many machines out of horendous bogs, But with Hi Tensile chain, Take the weight then both drive. NOT charge of at a hundred miles an hr with a bloody stretchy strap, Does anyone think of the drive lines of there vechicle IF the stuck vechicle does not move?.

Cheers Axle
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FollowupID: 432032

Reply By: Member - Brian (Gold Coast) - Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 19:10

Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 19:10
Something else I meant to say Craigww2.......
When you get your strap and stuff, go join a club that has a Draiver Awareness Program, or at the very least, do an accredited driver course that teaches you how to use the equipment and drive off road etc etc...... it just might save your life!

Cheers

Brian
AnswerID: 175965

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