scratches from sand on windscreen

Submitted: Thursday, Jun 01, 2006 at 20:10
ThreadID: 34513 Views:2580 Replies:7 FollowUps:4
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When i was on fraser the wipers got accidently flicked on, not only did it make a terrible noise, but it left scratch lines all over the screen, i've put in a heap of elbow greece with a cutting compound polish, hard to tell if it made a difference, scratches are still there. to get the screen professionally polished its $110, hardly worth half a new screen. My question... Is there a polish specifically formulated for glass? should i just put up with it? or is there a way to cure my anal frustration with scrached glass?
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Reply By: Motherhen - Thursday, Jun 01, 2006 at 20:24

Thursday, Jun 01, 2006 at 20:24
Do you have insurance with 'free windscreen'? If so, and the scratches can be said to 'obscure vision', you may have a claim. Maybe not worth it if you have an excess on windscreens.
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Follow Up By: Sarg - Thursday, Jun 01, 2006 at 23:01

Thursday, Jun 01, 2006 at 23:01
Or a decent size rock at 20 paces.
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Follow Up By: ToyMotor - Friday, Jun 02, 2006 at 19:51

Friday, Jun 02, 2006 at 19:51
No, no, don't chuck the rock - it will bounce off and dent your bonnet! Give the screen a good belt with a hammer instead.

Cheers
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Follow Up By: V8Diesel - Friday, Jun 02, 2006 at 20:07

Friday, Jun 02, 2006 at 20:07
Centre punch works well.
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Reply By: kev.h - Thursday, Jun 01, 2006 at 21:39

Thursday, Jun 01, 2006 at 21:39
have used a pooduct called jewlers ruge -it is used for polishing jems etc.- use with small lamswool buff on an electric drill worked well should be available from jewelery supply stores, try it on an old piece of glass first so you can see how it works
Kev
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Reply By: luch - Thursday, Jun 01, 2006 at 22:19

Thursday, Jun 01, 2006 at 22:19
I don't know what car you have but i know a windscreen for a 80 series is only $140
Find out what a new glass cost for your model i don't like your chances of being able to polish them out

Keep in mind "nothing worse than driving, facing the afternoon sun with a scratched or sandblasted windscreen"
AnswerID: 176234

Reply By: Member - Doug T (QLD) - Thursday, Jun 01, 2006 at 22:30

Thursday, Jun 01, 2006 at 22:30
sam_84h
Long times back in the late 60s I was involved in the hobby of Lapidary, thats gemstone cutting and polishing, I use to use some synthetic stone called Goldstone and it came from Italy ,it was Glass with copper fillings in it , and I polishrd it to a high finish with Tin Oxide mixed to a slurry with water on a wooly buff, If the scratches are to deep to polish out you could try using a 500 grit silicon paper and finish it with a 600 silicon paper then apply the polish,after the Tin Oxide/water I used another one to finish it off but can't remember what it was called but it was a tan color and messy , glass is like Opals , can't let to much heat build up or it will pit, use lots of water if you use the grit papers , I HAVE NOT TRIED THIS REMEDY ON A WINDSCREEN
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Follow Up By: Member - Doug T (QLD) - Thursday, Jun 01, 2006 at 22:40

Thursday, Jun 01, 2006 at 22:40
Just looking on the net for compounds and see that now Tin Oxide is $58.00 kg Phew
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Reply By: Member - John R (NSW) - Friday, Jun 02, 2006 at 07:25

Friday, Jun 02, 2006 at 07:25
The stuff you're loking for is called Cerium Oxide. Glassies use it for polishing and smoothing.

If you're attempting to polish by hand, you'll still find it very labour intensive. It might be more economical to just have it replaced.
AnswerID: 176267

Reply By: sam_84h - Sunday, Jun 04, 2006 at 16:27

Sunday, Jun 04, 2006 at 16:27
thanks all, your responses are helpful. i think i'll decide what to do after i return from the canning trip... the chances of getting a chip or crack are too high to replace it before the trip.
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Reply By: Member - John R (NSW) - Sunday, Jun 04, 2006 at 20:53

Sunday, Jun 04, 2006 at 20:53
I just remembered Sam, if you get someone to polish the scratches out, there is a chance that you will get distortions in your vision as a result of polishing now changing the generally perfectly smooth and consistent thickness of the outside glass layer. This will be quite obvious if the operator has to concentrate on any deep scratches.

To get an idea of difference, take a look through your run of the mill plate glass window at an angle. Traditionally "rolled" glass has undulations and distortions which are quite easy to see. Windscreen glass is "floated" and is optically very consistent when looking through it at almost any angle.
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